News An email exchange in April 2011 between Rebekah Brooks and her husband, Charles Brooks, referred to her losing an iPad

One phone on the list may have been a duplicate, another may have belonged to someone else and one iPad may have been lost

Start preparing for Euro now, says Blair

TONY BLAIR will today issue the Government's most positive statement yet on the single currency by calling on the private and public sectors to start preparing now for British entry.

Voss Net catches Internet fever

VOSS NET, the AIM-listed electronic commerce group, has become the latest stock to catch Internet fever after the company announced an agreement to supply free Internet access to schools in Britain.

If the house is an office, take cover

Insurance is vital if you join the growing band of people working from home, says Tim Collison

Bosses top fiddles league

EVERYBODY SEEMS to be at it, but men do it more than women and "fat-cat" directors are the worst of all. The British workplace is plagued by a "culture of dishonesty" with senior executives more than twice as likely to steal from their companies as shopfloor workers.

The process of learning is the main point

It's not what you learn, it's how you learn it that matters, writes Tamsin Smith

Compel wins pounds 75m BBC servicing

COMPEL, the computer distribution group, has made a major breakthrough by winning a pounds 75m contract to become the preferred supplier of computer hardware, software and services to the BBC.

It's the thought that counts

The way you visualise a new product could bring it to the market quicker, says Roger Trapp

Nerve damage shows RSI is not just in the mind

THE DISABLING condition known as repetitive strain injury (RSI) is not all in the mind but may be caused by sensory damage to the nerves in the hand, researchers say.

`My injuries finished my chances of work'

ONE OF the most celebrated recent victories for an RSI sufferer was that of Anne Packer, who won pounds 70,000 from her employer just before Christmas, writes Jeremy Laurance.

Letter: Laptop dunces

Sir: Thousands of executives use laptops every day by typing on the keyboard. It is a dismal reflection on the IT skills of politicians that the new ministerial red-laptops (report, 13 January) are voice operated.

Christmas presents: Computer accessories

Computers can be an endless source of gift ideas from pounds 20 to pounds 3,000. You can buy extra memory, a new hard disc, a new printer, even computer furniture.

Public schools raided in child porn inquiry

Police have raided a suspected national child pornography ring, which could include several teachers. Jason Bennetto, Crime Correspondent, reports on the latest attempt to crackdown on the child sex industry.

Computer burglars spread net for computer

Burglars have discovered a new way to find out when your home computer will be unguarded: ring you up and ask. Charles Arthur, Science Editor, explains why a computer survey offering free software is something you can do without.

Linguistic dysfunction - before and after

As the election campaign grinds on into its fifth long year, let us turn aside today and consider something altogether higher, that is, the grand workings of the English language. Yes, it's time to welcome back Professor Wordsmith to answer all your linguistic inquiries, and this week he is taking questions on the mysterious world of prefixes and suffixes. All yours, prof!

Security conscious Whitehall falls foul of thieves

Going to a car boot sale this weekend? It might be as well to look out for the increasingly popular designer label: "Property of HM Government".
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Prices correct as of 17 October 2014
Isis in Syria: A general reveals the lack of communication with the US - and his country's awkward relationship with their allies-by-default

A Syrian general speaks

A senior officer of Bashar al-Assad’s regime talks to Robert Fisk about his army’s brutal struggle with Isis, in a dirty war whose challenges include widespread atrocities
‘A bit of a shock...’ Cambridge economist with Glasgow roots becomes Zambia’s acting President

‘A bit of a shock...’ Economist with Glasgow roots becomes Zambia’s acting President

Guy Scott's predecessor, Michael Sata, died in a London hospital this week after a lengthy illness
Fall of the Berlin Wall: History catches up with Erich Honecker - the East German leader who praised the Iron Curtain and claimed it prevented a Third World War

Fall of the Berlin Wall

History catches up with Erich Honecker - the East German leader who praised the Iron Curtain and claimed it prevented a Third World War
How to turn your mobile phone into easy money

Turn your mobile phone into easy money

There are 90 million unused mobiles in the UK, which would be worth £7bn if we cashed them in, says David Crookes
Independent writers remember their Saturday jobs:

Independent writers remember their Saturday jobs

"I have never regarded anything I have done in "the media" as a proper job"
Lyricist Richard Thomas shares his 11-step recipe for creating a hit West End musical

11-step recipe for creating a West End hit

Richard Thomas, the lyricist behind the Jerry Springer and Anna Nicole Smith operas, explains how Bob Dylan, 'Breaking Bad' and even Noam Chomsky inspired his songbook for the new musical 'Made in Dagenham'
Tonke Dragt's The Letter for the King has finally been translated into English ... 50 years on

Buried treasure: The Letter for the King

The coming-of-age tale about a boy and his mission to save a mythical kingdom has sold a million copies since it was written by an eccentric Dutchwoman in 1962. Yet until last year, no one had read it in English
Can instilling a sense of entrepreneurship in pupils have a positive effect on their learning?

The school that means business

Richard Garner heads to Lancashire, where developing the 'dragons' of the future is also helping one community academy to achieve its educational goals
10 best tablets

The world in your pocket: 10 best tablets

They’re thin, they’re light, you can use them for work on the move or keeping entertained
Lutz Pfannenstiel: The goalkeeper who gave up Bayern Munich for the Crazy Gang, Bradford and a whirlwind trawl across continents

Lutz Pfannenstiel interview

The goalkeeper who gave up Bayern Munich for the Crazy Gang, Bradford and a whirlwind trawl across continents
Pete Jenson: Popular Jürgen Klopp can reignite Borussia Dortmund’s season with visit to Bayern Munich

Pete Jenson's a Different League

Popular Klopp can reignite Dortmund’s season with visit to Bayern
John Cantlie video proves that Isis expects victory in Kobani

Cantlie video proves that Isis expects victory in Kobani

The use of the British hostage demonstrates once again the militants' skill and originality in conducting a propaganda war, says Patrick Cockburn
The killer instinct: The man who helps students spot potential murderers

The killer instinct

Phil Chalmers travels the US warning students how to spot possible future murderers, but can his contentious methods really stop the bloodshed?
Clothing the gap: A new exhibition celebrates women who stood apart from the fashion herd

Clothing the gap

A new exhibition celebrates women who stood apart from the fashion herd
Fall of the Berlin Wall: Goodbye to all that - the lost world beyond the Iron Curtain

The Fall of the Berlin Wall

Goodbye to all that - the lost world beyond the Iron Curtain