Cinema as history: Movies to treasure forever

This year's entries to the US Library of Congress archives range from blockbusters to forgotten gems

The Graduate, By Charles Webb

I'd unfairly dismissed Charles Webb's The Graduate, first published in 1963, as one of those novels outdone by the movie it inspired. But, as Hanif Kureishi remarks in his introduction to this new edition, the book is more than a match for the film, carried along on light and limber prose.

The real Steve McQueen

Hollywood's king of cool is being celebrated in a new season at the BFI. Geoffrey Macnab uncovers the reality behind the action man

Investment Column: Strong yield makes Filtrona a certain bet

Harvey Nash; RPC Group

Why autism is different for girls

We may think it only affects boys. But the female variant is often much harder to spot – and that means thousands of girls may be going undiagnosed. Jeremy Laurance reports

Simon and Garfunkel classic Mrs Robinson enjoys renewed popularity

Simon and Garfunkel classic Mrs Robinson is enjoying a popularity revival due to an internet campaign to push the song to number one - "in honour of Northern Ireland's disgraced First Lady".

Kim Peek, the inspiration for 'Rain Man', dies of heart attack

The autistic savant whose extraordinary genius for mental retention inspired the Oscar-winning film Rain Man has died, his parents confirmed yesterday.

Velvet touch Luxury gift service opens in London

Bokks, a new luxury gift buying service fronted by celebrities, including actor Dustin Hoffman and designer Neil Barrett, is set to launch tomorrow in London. The concept came about when Walter Bugno, the new chief executive of Bokks and the ex-boss of Australia's Sydney football club, sold his previous company and struggled to find a single place from which to buy his staff top-quality gifts.

Wave hello to the surf genius with Asperger's

At just 20, Clay Marzo is already seen as the most talented surfer of his generation. A new film explains how his condition could have given him a unique edge over his competitors. Guy Adams watches in awe

Larry Gelbart: Comedy writer best known for 'M*A*S*H' on television and 'Tootsie' in the cinema

Described by Woody Allen as "the best comedy writer I ever knew", Larry Gelbart was a skilled humorist who had hits in the theatre, cinema and on television. He received both a Tony Award and an Emmy, and his Broadway show libretti included the boisterous and bawdy A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum (1962), the first Broadway show to have both words and music by Stephen Sondheim, based on the plays of Plautus, and the deliciously witty pastiche of film noir, City of Angels (1989). On screen, he won Oscar nominations for his scripting of the George Burns vehicle, Oh, God! (1977) and the hilarious gender-swapping tale Tootsie (1982).

Greyhound buses launch on British roads

For 95 years they have been a staple of American popular culture. Immortalised in film and song, the silver and blue livery of Greyhound buses have long been a common sight on US highways. And now they are to launch in Britain.

Sugar, Anna Boden and Ryan Fleck, 114 mins, (15)<br>Last Chance Harvey, Joel Hopkins, 92 mins, (12A)

Poignant, sweet and very funny. A sports movie that's pitch perfect

Last Chance Harvey (12A)

In this autumnal romance Dustin Hoffman plays a disappointed musician (he writes jingles for a living) who flies to London for the wedding of his only daughter.

Romantic tales of Dustin Hoffman

The star of 'The Graduate', 'Rain Man', and 'Meet the Fockers' tells Gill Pringle the best way to act a love story

Days Like These: 'Everybody hates us. And if we met ourselves at a party, we'd hate us, too'

In March, Matthew instigates the "Why haven't you done anything about the garden?" row. In the middle of July, he asks, "How do you know I'm not anaphylactic if I've never actually been stung by a wasp?"; and in December we embark on the "We have no friends" debate. I knew this particularly festive discussion was imminent from the look on Matthew's face as he sat on the sofa, the twinkling tree lights reflected so prettily in his whisky tumbler. He was staring forlornly at the mantelpiece.

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