<a href="http://martinking.livejournal.com/1336.html">Marathon Man: Drivers, you're round the bend</a>

Drivers: you're idiots. Murderous, stupid, criminal cretins. Not all of you, I know. Not all of the time, maybe. But there is one particular driving fault that I can vouch affects most of you, most of the time.

<a href="http://martinking.livejournal.com/1203.html">Marathon Man: With a little help from the gizmo</a>

OK, I know part of the aim to enter the London Marathon was to get off my backside, leave the computer screens behind and hit the road. But all those years with the geeks left me feeling the need for a bit of techie assistance.

First night: Rain Man, Apollo Theatre, London

Film star fails to shine in dull stage performance

Sleeping around: A bit of balance

'There's a lot to be said for taking the time to get to know the other person and not falling for a fantasy image'

Simon Calder: You're still safer up there than down here

This perfect storm, or so the airlines believed until yesterday, had three dimensions: the unprecedented price of oil; weakening demand from cash-strapped holidaymakers and businesses; and reluctance among the banks to shore up ailing carriers.

After 35 years, 'Papillon' gets Hollywood remake

When a film about a petty criminal who was wrongly convicted of murder and banished to a desert island colony was released in 1973, it instantly earned a place in movie folklore for the phenomenal on-screen chemistry between its two lead stars, Steve McQueen and Dustin Hoffman.

Picture Post: Roll credits - Gene Hackman bows out

"I guess you could call it retired. I haven't worked for four years now." Gene Hackman, 78, will make no more movies, if Hollywood's gossip columnists are to be believed. Hackman declared this week that he doesn't want to play grandfathers or doddering old men, and says he won't miss movie-making. Audiences, though, are sure to miss him. He lacked the star wattage of Dustin Hoffman and Jack Nicholson, and would probably have remained a character actor, but he brought a craggy intensity to his best roles and seldom, if ever, gave a bad performance.

Midnight Cowboy

Directed by John Frankenheimer

Scenes from a Revolution, by Mark Harris

Are American films any worse now than they used to be? It's tempting to name a year and suggest that, before this point, movies were better, but is the idea of Transformers being nominated for an Oscar any crazier than Dr Dolittle making the Best Picture list four decades earlier? There have been key periods, though, when Hollywood has experienced a sea change. In 1981, after Raiders of the Lost Ark won Best Picture, there was a shift away from films with a demanding European aesthetic, towards merchandisable matinee popcorn. In 1967, Mark Harris argues, there was another pivotal moment, as studio-generated epics gave way to smaller films that reflected the countercultural thirst for change.

Roy Scheider: Actor best known as Police Chief Brody in the blockbuster 'Jaws'

Lean faced and sinewy, the versatile actor Roy Scheider reached his career peak in the Seventies, when he received two Oscar nominations, as best supporting actor for his role as police partner to "Popeye" Doyle (Gene Hackman) in The French Connection (1971), and as best actor for his uncompromising performance in Bob Fosse's autobiographical All That Jazz (1979).

BOX OFFICE: FILMS

UK Top 10

FILM: Racing Stripes (PG) Frederik Du Chau ii888

Just as Buzz Lightyear thought he was really an astronaut, so Stripes the zebra thinks he's a thoroughbred racehorse. A stray from the circus, Stripes is adopted by a widowed horse-trainer (Bruce Greenwood) and befriended by a goat and a Shetland pony. That the latter are voiced respectively by Whoopi Goldberg and Dustin Hoffman should tip you the wink: this is school of Babe, where the animals talk to each other and flies whizz around enthusing over "poo".

FILM: TOP 10 FILMS UK & IRELAND

Most film sequels (apart from The Godfather Part II, of course) are subject to the gloomy law of diminishing returns, both critically and financially, but Jay Roach's Meet The Fockers (which follows 2000's Meet The Parents) has at least hit the box office top spot in its first week. But the combination of A-list Hollywood stars (including Dustin Hoffman, above) and lavatory humour has proved less successful with reviewers. Nobody seems to like it but the public.

Ocean's Twelve (12A)

When more is less

Kevin Whiteman: He came through the miners' strike in '85 but now for the great water revolt of 2005

Sipping at an 'Icytonic', Kelda's chief executive tells Tim Webb why his glass isn't half empty despite higher charges and City criticism
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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 1 May 2015
General Election 2015: Ed Miliband's unlikely journey from hapless geek to heart-throb

Miliband's unlikely journey from hapless geek to heart-throb

He was meant to be Labour's biggest handicap - but has become almost an asset
General Election 2015: A guide to the smaller parties, from the the National Health Action Party to the Church of the Militant Elvis Party

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From Militant Elvis to Women's Equality: a guide to the underdogs standing in the election
Amr Darrag: Ex-Muslim Brotherhood minister in exile still believes Egypt's military regime can be replaced with 'moderate' Islamic rule

'This is the battle of young Egypt for the future of our country'

Ex-Muslim Brotherhood minister Amr Darrag still believes the opposition can rid Egypt of its military regime and replace it with 'moderate' Islamic rule, he tells Robert Fisk
Why patients must rely less on doctors: Improving our own health is the 'blockbuster drug of the century'

Why patients must rely less on doctors

Improving our own health is the 'blockbuster drug of the century'
Sarah Lucas is the perfect artist to represent Britain at the Venice Biennale

Flesh in Venice

Sarah Lucas has filled the British pavilion at the Venice Biennale with slinky cats and casts of her female friends' private parts. It makes you proud to be a woman, says Karen Wright
11 best anti-ageing day creams

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Slow down the ageing process with one of these high-performance, hardworking anti-agers
Juventus 2 Real Madrid 1: Five things we learnt, including Iker Casillas is past it and Carlos Tevez remains effective

Juventus vs Real Madrid

Five things we learnt from the Italian's Champions League first leg win over the Spanish giants
Ashes 2015: Test series looks a lost cause for England... whoever takes over as ECB director of cricket

Ashes series looks a lost cause for England...

Whoever takes over as ECB director of cricket, says Stephen Brenkley
Fishing for votes with Nigel Farage: The Ukip leader shows how he can work an audience as he casts his line to the disaffected of Grimsby

Fishing is on Nigel Farage's mind

Ukip leader casts a line to the disaffected
Who is bombing whom in the Middle East? It's amazing they don't all hit each other

Who is bombing whom in the Middle East?

Robert Fisk untangles the countries and factions
China's influence on fashion: At the top of the game both creatively and commercially

China's influence on fashion

At the top of the game both creatively and commercially
Lord O’Donnell: Former cabinet secretary on the election and life away from the levers of power

The man known as GOD has a reputation for getting the job done

Lord O'Donnell's three principles of rule
Rainbow shades: It's all bright on the night

Rainbow shades

It's all bright on the night
'It was first time I had ever tasted chocolate. I kept a piece, and when Amsterdam was liberated, I gave it to the first Allied soldier I saw'

Bread from heaven

Dutch survivors thank RAF for World War II drop that saved millions
Britain will be 'run for the wealthy and powerful' if Tories retain power - Labour

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UK will be 'run for the wealthy and powerful' if Tories retain power