Film: Also showing: A mouse that roars

Mousehunt Gore Verbinski (PG)

Film: Hounded by success, dogged by failure

Barry Levinson has produced some fine work, says Ryan Gilbey, but it's time he stopped chasing his own tail

Film: Here's a tale you couldn't make up

A film about a US president embroiled in scandal? It's all too much of a coincidence, writes John Lyttle

How We Met: GERALDINE JAMES AND DAVID SUCHET

The actress Geraldine James, 47, began her career with five years in repertory theatre and went on to take many leading roles in the West End, but she reached her biggest audiences on TV, in series such as 'Blott on the Landscape' and 'The Jewel in the Crown'. She is married to the actor Jo Blatchley, and lives in Sussex and London with their daughter. James has just finished working on a new TV drama, 'Seesaw', with David Suchet, 52. Suchet, an associate artist of the Royal Shakespeare Company, has made numerous stage, screen and TV appearances, but he is probably best known for his portrayal of Hercule Poirot. He and his wife Sheila Ferris live with their two children in north London

Leading Article: The new censor is there for everyone, and we need him

Before we congratulate our founding editor on his appointment as the nation's chief censor, we should pause to ask what the British Board of Film Classification is actually for. Its title and constitution, as a body set up by the film industry, but with quasi-judicial powers, have a fustiness about them. And sometimes the very idea of censorship can seem somewhat antique.

Edinburgh Festival 97: Marathon man

Eleven down, four to go: Peter Hurford is nearing the end of his 15-concert run through the organ works of JS Bach. Laurence Hughes went along to hear him

More bangs for your Buck: Edinburgh Festival 97

Buck Henry's script for `The Graduate' captured the spirit of the age. But don't pitch him ideas for a sequel. By Liese Spencer

A frying pan for a cradle-snatcher

Did you feel uneasy when you saw 33-year old Tracey Whalin in chains, awaiting a possible sentence of 20 years for having sex with her son's 14-year-old friend, Sean Kinsella? I think a woman like that ought to be told that she's foolish for not being discreet and have her knuckles rapped for being so extremely naughty. But criminalised? No.

Leading Article: In Florida, escapist fantasy can swamp reality

Eastbourne with alligators: why is Florida the place to escape to? Tracey Whalin and her son's 14-year-old friend are not the first runaways to seek to get away from humdrum reality in this fantasy paradise of permanent sunshine. But why should this particular swamp serve as the Never-Never Land of so much of the world's collective dreams?

A near-perfect first week, Tony, but don't let it get too informal

President Bill Clinton's closest campaign advisor delivered a warning to Tony Blair last night on how things could go wrong if he failed to lay the right foundations for government.

007 under fire for his anti-gun stance

An anti-handgun advertising campaign came under attack yesterday from gun lobby enthusiasts who launched a pre-emptive strike by sending more than 50 letters of complaint to the Advertising Standards Authority before the commercials were screened.

Britannia rules the stage

They're not in it for the money. It won't help their film careers. So why do US stars come over here to tread the boards? Jasper Rees on the mixed fortunes of the spangled pilgrims to the `mecca' of theatre

A welcome return for Marathon Man

In the way of things, the number of anniversaries will grow year on year; but that can't account for the fearful number of them happening at the BBC just now - Choral Evensong is 70, Woman's Hour was 50 a couple of weeks ago (and I completely forgot to wish it a happy birthday - isn't that just like a man?), and Radio 3 is 50 too. As a rule, it's probably a good idea to ignore these factitious landmarks. But here's one we can't ignore, sitting like a big rock in the road: Radio 3's 50th anniversary production of Man and Superman (Sunday), the first play broadcast on the Third Programme, all four and a half hours of it. We can't go over it, we can't go around it, so we might as well get out and take a good look at it.

Taking a ride with my dream lover

Advertising is seductive - but Gina Cowen was happy to be taken in by the Alfa Spider

Tory fury as Labour breaks guns truce

The unofficial truce between the major parties over the Dunblane tragedy broke down yesterday as the Tories accused Labour of trying to make political capital by openly stating its preference to outlaw automatic and semi- automatic weapons.
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Day In a Page

Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
Sicily – seven nights from £939pp
Pompeii, Capri and the Bay of Naples - seven nights from £799pp
Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
Mary Rose – two nights from £319pp
Israel-Gaza conflict: No victory for Israel despite weeks of death and devastation

Robert Fisk: No victory for Israel despite weeks of devastation

Palestinians have won: they are still in Gaza, and Hamas is still there
Mary Beard writes character reference for Twitter troll who called her a 'slut'

Unlikely friends: Mary Beard and the troll who called her a ‘filthy old slut’

The Cambridge University classicist even wrote the student a character reference
America’s new apartheid: Prosperous white districts are choosing to break away from black cities and go it alone

America’s new apartheid

Prosperous white districts are choosing to break away from black cities and go it alone
Amazon is buying Twitch for £600m - but why do people want to watch others playing Xbox?

What is the appeal of Twitch?

Amazon is buying the video-game-themed online streaming site for £600m - but why do people want to watch others playing Xbox?
Tip-tapping typewriters, ripe pongs and slides in the office: Bosses are inventing surprising ways of making us work harder

How bosses are making us work harder

As it is revealed that one newspaper office pumps out the sound of typewriters to increase productivity, Gillian Orr explores the other devices designed to motivate staff
Manufacturers are struggling to keep up with the resurgence in vinyl records

Hard pressed: Resurgence in vinyl records

As the resurgence in vinyl records continues, manufacturers and their outdated machinery are struggling to keep up with the demand
Tony Jordan: 'I turned down the chance to research Charles Dickens for a TV series nine times ... then I found a kindred spirit'

A tale of two writers

Offered the chance to research Charles Dickens for a TV series, Tony Jordan turned it down. Nine times. The man behind EastEnders and Life on Mars didn’t feel right for the job. Finally, he gave in - and found an unexpected kindred spirit
Could a later start to the school day be the most useful educational reform of all?

Should pupils get a lie in?

Doctors want a later start to the school day so that pupils can sleep later. Not because teenagers are lazy, explains Simon Usborne - it's all down to their circadian rhythms
Prepare for Jewish jokes – as Jewish comedians get their own festival

Prepare for Jewish jokes...

... as Jewish comedians get their own festival
SJ Watson: 'I still can't quite believe that Before I Go to Sleep started in my head'

A dream come true for SJ Watson

Watson was working part time in the NHS when his debut novel, Before I Go to Sleep, became a bestseller. Now it's a Hollywood movie, too. Here he recalls the whirlwind journey from children’s ward to A-list film set
10 best cycling bags for commuters

10 best cycling bags for commuters

Gear up for next week’s National Cycle to Work day with one of these practical backpacks and messenger bags
Paul Scholes: Three at the back isn’t working yet but given time I’m hopeful Louis van Gaal can rebuild Manchester United

Paul Scholes column

Three at the back isn’t working yet but given time I’m hopeful Louis van Gaal can rebuild Manchester United
Kate Bush, Hammersmith Apollo music review: A preamble, then a coup de théâtre - and suddenly the long wait felt worth it

Kate Bush shows a voice untroubled by time

A preamble, then a coup de théâtre - and suddenly the long wait felt worth it
Robot sheepdog technology could be used to save people from burning buildings

The science of herding is cracked

Mathematical model would allow robots to be programmed to control crowds and save people from burning buildings
Tyrant: Is the world ready for a Middle Eastern 'Dallas'?

This tyrant doesn’t rule

It’s billed as a Middle Eastern ‘Dallas’, so why does Fox’s new drama have a white British star?