Arts and Entertainment

Germaine Greer planting some trees, is there a whole book in that? The answer is a resounding “yes” after reading this heartfelt, sharp and meticulously researched account of the author’s decade-long efforts to rebuild a small corner of rainforest in her home country of Australia.

Wednesday Books: Where society is not a dirty word

CONVERSATIONS WITH ANTHONY GIDDENS: MAKING SENSE OF MODERNITY BY ANTHONY GIDDENS AND CHRISTOPHER PIERSON, POLITY PRESS, pounds 12.95 PAROXYSM: INTERVIEWS WITH PHILIPPE PETIT BY JACQUES BAUDRILLARD AND PHILIPPE PETIT, VERSO, pounds 11

LETTER: Live art needs cash

LETTER:

Games: Raising Cyberbaby

Fast forward

Genetics: Unease at use of modified crops

British Association: Predisposition to social problems inherited; orgasms aid fertility; and `phantom limb syndrome'

The knack How to be an eco-warrior

"If your local environment is under threat, try the normal channels first. Call a meeting and get as many useful names and phone numbers as you can. Find out who has access to fax machines, the Internet and photocopiers, and get them to contact the local newspapers to complain about the proposed scheme. Ask local groups for support; try writing to anyone in authority who may be able to halt the `development'. Look for irregularities in the planning applications. Cross-reference company names, building contractors, names of directors and major shareholders against the council and look for links: for example, wife works in planning department, husband has building company.

People & Business: Maharishi gets a flexible friend

WHEN John Lennon sang "Sexy Sadie" on the Beatles' White Album in 1968, he cannot have imagined that 30 years later the man he lampooned in the song, the Maharishi Yogi, would be issuing his own credit card to the British public.

Prague Greens smash symbols of global market

EVENTUALLY, it seems, every dream must turn sour. Four Prague police officers were injured and several dozen people arrested at the weekend in protests in which shop windows, including that of McDonald's on Wenceslas Square, were smashed.

The start of something big for small-scale living

PETER ANDREWS has just added to the long list of British eccentricities. He's formed the Secret Shed and Handmade Hideaway Society - and is hoping that it will soon become a familiar name to all but a dedicated troglodyte.

It's spintime, and cuckoos are all around

PERHAPS I should write to the Times. The other day, as we lay- in later than usual (thank goodness for half-term) both my wife and I thought we heard a cuckoo.

Letter: Spengler described our world

BERNARD Noble's description of the impact of global communications on societies - commercialised subversion and fragment-

Allotment holders dig in to protect their patch

A parliamentary committee will investigate the plight of allotment gardeners this month as their plots are eaten up in the rush to build new housing. Enthusiasts hope MPs can persuade ministers to act but, writes Fran Abrams, there has been little sign that this will happen.

A mother's place is in the wrong

MADONNA AND CHILD: Towards a New Politics of Motherhood by Melissa Benn, Cape pounds 12.99

Skiing: green channel

One would think that sliding down a mountain on a couple of slats of wood was one of the least environmentally damaging things a fun-loving tourist could do. Unfortunately, when there are thousands of us doing it all at the same time our need for chalets, roads, ski-lifts, water and fuel puts a heavy burden on the environment and on the local villages. We even often need snow made for us by gas-guzzling snow cannons.

Property: The ethical ideal home

Consumer pressure has forced suppliers to offer environmentally- sound house products. Gareth Lloyd tells you where to find them

Books: More snow falling on readers

After Miss Smilla came a storm of icy chillers. Now the genre's gone green, says Jane Jakeman
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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

How Isis profits from destruction of antiquities

Robert Fisk on the terrorist group's manipulation of the market to increase the price of artefacts
Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

In an exclusive interview, Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea
Tunisia fears its Arab Spring could be reversed as the new regime becomes as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor

The Arab Spring reversed

Tunisian protesters fear that a new law will whitewash corrupt businessmen and officials, but they are finding that the new regime is becoming as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor
King Arthur: Legendary figure was real and lived most of his life in Strathclyde, academic claims

Academic claims King Arthur was real - and reveals where he lived

Dr Andrew Breeze says the legendary figure did exist – but was a general, not a king
Who is Oliver Bonas and how has he captured middle-class hearts?

Who is Oliver Bonas?

It's the first high-street store to pay its staff the living wage, and it saw out the recession in style
Earth has 'lost more than half its trees' since humans first started cutting them down

Axe-wielding Man fells half the world’s trees – leaving us just 422 each

However, the number of trees may be eight times higher than previously thought
60 years of Scalextric: Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones

60 years of Scalextric

Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones
Theme parks continue to draw in thrill-seekers despite the risks - so why are we so addicted?

Why are we addicted to theme parks?

Now that Banksy has unveiled his own dystopian version, Christopher Beanland considers the ups and downs of our endless quest for amusement
Tourism in Iran: The country will soon be opening up again after years of isolation

Iran is opening up again to tourists

After years of isolation, Iran is reopening its embassies abroad. Soon, there'll be the chance for the adventurous to holiday there
10 best PS4 games

10 best PS4 games

Can’t wait for the new round of blockbusters due out this autumn? We played through last year’s offering
Transfer window: Ten things we learnt

Ten things we learnt from the transfer window

Record-breaking spending shows FFP restraint no longer applies
Migrant crisis: UN official Philippe Douste-Blazy reveals the harrowing sights he encountered among refugees arriving on Lampedusa

‘Can we really just turn away?’

Dead bodies, men drowning, women miscarrying – a senior UN figure on the horrors he has witnessed among migrants arriving on Lampedusa, and urges politicians not to underestimate our caring nature
Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger as Isis ravages centuries of history

Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger...

... and not just because of Isis vandalism
Girl on a Plane: An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack

Girl on a Plane

An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack
Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

The author of 'The Day of the Jackal' has revealed he spied for MI6 while a foreign correspondent