News from Berlin, By Otto de Kat (Translated by Ina Rilke) - Review

It’s wartime, 1941. Dutch diplomat Oscar Verschuur’s family are dispersed throughout Europe. He is posted in Switzerland, his wife Kate volunteers in a London hospital and his daughter Emma is married to Carl, a “good” German, and is based in Berlin.

Wait for it...Obama is to make a statement on the NSA after his holiday

Barack Obama puts his 'annus horribilis' on hold

Edward Snowden's revelations about the NSA have wounded the President almost as much as the disastrous roll-out of his healthcare reform

Hathaway after a fire at the US Embassy in Moscow; he had refused to let in firemen, suspecting some may have been KGB agents

Gardner Hathaway: Intelligence officer whose resourcefulness during the Cold War made him highly esteemed by his colleagues

Gardner Hathaway was a CIA chief of counter-intelligence whose career took him to Cold War focal points ranging from Berlin to Moscow and placed him at the centre of many espionage episodes. Taciturn but courtly, "Gus" Hathaway was an undercover officer known for his mastery of espionage tradecraft and his aggressive efforts to best the KGB. "Gus was a risk-taker," said Jack Downing, a former CIA deputy director of operations. "We needed good intelligence, and we needed to be aggressive to get it. He was canny and smart."

Robert Levinson: US man missing in Iran ‘was on CIA mission’

An investigation has claimed the retired FBI agent was on an unapproved intelligence gathering mission when he went missing in 2007

More job losses likely as government departments face further budget cuts

Government departments will have to find a further £3bn of cuts over the next three years, in a move likely to result in further job cuts and programme closures.

The NSA's offices in Fort Meade, Maryland

NSA collects data 'revealing location of five billion mobile phones every day'

The records allow US intelligence agents to establish not just the movements of individuals but to monitor who else they communicate with

Editor of The Guardian newspaper Alan Rusbridger gives evidence to the Commons Home Affairs Committee hearing on counter-terrorism

Just 1% of Snowden files published says Guardian editor

Appearing for questioning in front of the Home Affairs Select Committee, Alan Rusbridger said: ‘This is an ongoing story we are writing’

Streetwise: Charlie Cox in 'Legacy'

Legacy: TV review - clichés spoil a reds-under-the-bed spy story with shades of le Carré

Did they play golf in Soviet Russia? If not, then the KGB's idea of burying a secret cache in a bunker on a golf course might seem less slipshod than it did in last night's BBC2 Cold War spy thriller Legacy. After all, how was the KGB to know that British courses are full of perennially useless hackers such as myself who, when bunkered, tends to displace more sand than Lawrence of Arabia charging a Turkish goods train? I'd soon have uncovered it.

Blinding: the Left Wing, By Mircea Cartarescu: Book review - memory and satire meld magically in this Bucharest tale

The media hysterics who depict Romania solely as the home of demon migrant hordes will not care that a novelist from that country became a hot tip for the Nobel Prize in Literature this year.

Indyplus video: BBC's Legacy

Wikipedia co-founder Jimmy Wales calls Edward Snowden a 'hero'

Wales praised Snowden for the care he took in the materials he leaked and described the NSA revelations as "incredibly damaging and embarrassing to the US"

Postcard from... Berlin

The disclosure that US intelligence bugged Angela Merkel’s mobile telephone from a secret listening post on top of Berlin’s American Embassy provoked sharp criticism.

President Barack Obama speaks at the 2013 Tribal Nations Conference in Washington, DC.

US President Barack Obama's Security Service agents face questions over new sex scandal

Two cases in quick succession have placed US secret agents under scrutiny

Browning, left, in Munich in 1945; he was stunned that a perpetrator of war crimes could be used by the Allies

Colonel Earl Browning: Counter-intelligence officer who was a lone voice in opposing the use of Klaus Barbie as a paid informant

Earl Browning was a counter-intelligence officer in occupied Germany after the Second World War who raised persistent but unheeded objections when the US military began using the notorious Gestapo chief Klaus Barbie as a paid informant. Browning had served in the Counter Intelligence Corps in Normandy and at the Battle of the Bulge. At war's end he was stationed in Frankfurt, monitoring intelligence activities in the US-occupied zone.

Remembrance of things Proust: ‘In Search of Lost Time’

Happy birthday to a timeless classic: Marcel Proust's In Search of Lost Time turns 100

No publisher would touch Proust's book in 1913 so he had to pay his own printing costs, says Boyd Tonkin

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