Dance: Smoke without fire

PACO PEnA FLAMENCO DANCE COMPANY PEACOCK THEATRE LONDON

Let smokers co-opt the nicotine patch and turn the sign of the pariah into a mark of pride

I should have seen what we despised minorities had in common earlier, only smoke got in my eyes. And in my ears, for surely the shared slang alone ought to have filter-tipped me off to our tortured bond.

STICKING TO HIS GUNS

Film: Actor stephen rea, one of the stars of Trojan Eddie, talks to John Lyttle

Bruce, Terry and Brad's excellent adventure

THE CRITICS: Film

You are about to read a true story...

For 10 years, Paul Auster wrote novels packed full of strange coincidences. Get real, said his critics. So he did. By Kevin Jackson

FILM / Profits without honour: Will the Oscars next week breath new life into the British Film Industry? Sheila Johnston reports

This year the announcement of a grand total of 25 Oscar nominations (per Screen International) for British contenders has tipped the UK media into one of its periodic feeding frenzies. It's sobering to remember, though, that this general aura of self-congratulation and euphoria isn't nearly matched by the three main candidates' box-office success in their own country. The Crying Game (6 nominations) steamed this week past the dollars 40 million mark in America, and on to the front page of Variety. It has, according to Neil McCartney of Screen Finance, more than doubled its take there since the nominations were announced. Here, it has taken just over pounds 1.3m, adding only pounds 400,000 over last month.

Oscar panel gives the Game away

THE TANTALISING secret at the heart of the highly successful British film The Crying Game was blown wide open yesterday, ending months of self-imposed censorship by most of the world's film critics.

FILM / Crossing boundaries: Adam Mars-Jones on Neil Jordan's The Crying Game

THE CAREFUL first shot of The Crying Game (18) sets up in a subtle way the film's peculiar territory. A town by a river in Northern Ireland, with a funfair in progress. Percy Sledge is singing 'When a Man Loves a Woman'. The camera slowly tracks across the river, so that our perspective on the town changes: the colour of the village green contrasts with the pale green growth on some sand dunes, and it comes as a little shock to realise how near the sea actually is. The town is only seen in this first sequence, but the opening shot is a clever abstract announcement of what the film has to offer - a tightly focused story, with large implications, much concerned with crossing over, with the changing of sides and the dissolving of boundaries.

FILM / Cries and whispers: Scorched by Hollywood, Neil Jordan is back in Britain and back on form. John Lyttle reports

The title of Neil Jordan's latest film enjoys a certain aptness. To borrow from the ballad, he does know all there is to know about The Crying Game.

The Sunday Preview: From hostage to kidnapper, in one easy move

THE NEXT in our series of film previews for readers is a movie with a real difference: it's British. Or rather Anglo-Irish. It's The Crying Game, directed by Neil Jordan and produced by Stephen Woolley - the team that made Mona Lisa and The Company of Wolves. Stephen Rea (above), fresh from his stage success as a hostage in Someone Who'll Watch over Me, plays a kidnapper, an IRA man with a
Career Services

Day In a Page

Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Dubrovnik, the Dalmatian Coast & Montenegro
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Lisbon, Oporto and the Douro Valley
Lake Garda, Venice & Verona
Spain
Prices correct as of 30 January 2015
As in 1942, Germany must show restraint over Greece

As in 1942, Germany must show restraint over Greece

Mussolini tried to warn his ally of the danger of bringing the country to its knees. So should we, says Patrick Cockburn
Britain's widening poverty gap should be causing outrage at the start of the election campaign

The short stroll that should be our walk of shame

Courting the global elite has failed to benefit Britain, as the vast disparity in wealth on display in the capital shows
Homeless Veterans appeal: The rise of the working poor: when having a job cannot prevent poverty

Homeless Veterans appeal

The rise of the working poor: when having a job cannot prevent poverty
Prince Charles the saviour of the nation? A new book highlights concerns about how political he will be when he eventually becomes king

Prince Charles the saviour of the nation?

A new book highlights concerns about how political he will be when he eventually becomes king
How books can defeat Isis: Patrick Cockburn was able to update his agenda-setting 'The Rise of Islamic State' while under attack in Baghdad

How books can defeat Isis

Patrick Cockburn was able to update his agenda-setting 'The Rise of Islamic State' while under attack in Baghdad
Judith Hackitt: The myths of elf 'n' safety

Judith Hackitt: The myths of elf 'n' safety

She may be in charge of minimising our risks of injury, but the chair of the Health and Safety Executive still wants children to be able to hurt themselves
The open loathing between Barack Obama and Benjamin Netanyahu just got worse

The open loathing between Obama and Netanyahu just got worse

The Israeli PM's relationship with the Obama has always been chilly, but going over the President's head on Iran will do him no favours, says Rupert Cornwell
French chefs get 'le huff' as nation slips down global cuisine rankings

French chefs get 'le huff' as nation slips down global cuisine rankings

Fury at British best restaurants survey sees French magazine produce a rival list
Star choreographer Matthew Bourne gives young carers a chance to perform at Sadler's Wells

Young carers to make dance debut

What happened when superstar choreographer Matthew Bourne encouraged 27 teenage carers to think about themselves for once?
Design Council's 70th anniversary: Four of the most intriguing prototypes from Ones to Watch

Design Council's 70th anniversary

Four of the most intriguing prototypes from Ones to Watch
Dame Harriet Walter: The actress on learning what it is to age, plastic surgery, and her unease at being honoured by the establishment

Dame Harriet Walter interview

The actress on learning what it is to age, plastic surgery, and her unease at being honoured by the establishment
Art should not be a slave to the ideas driving it

Art should not be a slave to the ideas driving it

Critics of Tom Stoppard's new play seem to agree that cerebral can never trump character, says DJ Taylor
Bill Granger recipes: Our chef's winter salads will make you feel energised through February

Bill Granger's winter salads

Salads aren't just a bit on the side, says our chef - their crunch, colour and natural goodness are perfect for a midwinter pick-me-up
England vs Wales: Cool head George Ford ready to put out dragon fire

George Ford: Cool head ready to put out dragon fire

No 10’s calmness under pressure will be key for England in Cardiff
Michael Calvin: Time for Old Firm to put aside bigotry and forge new links

Michael Calvin's Last Word

Time for Old Firm to put aside bigotry and forge new links