News An aerial picture of the Grand Canyon in Arizona from around 30,000 feet (10,000m)

It was thought that the global landmark was perhaps 70million years old

Travel by numbers: Wildebeest

The great migration has started early this year. Tom Watts sizes up one of Africa's wild wonders...

Mark Steel: It takes a goal (and a few Amstels) for Dutch courage to kick in

Fan's eye view: At last, they were a proper football crowd, screaming, squealing, no longer fated to lose

US geologist jailed for eight years in China for oil research

An american geologist held and tortured by China's state-security agents was sentenced to eight years in prison yesterday for gathering data on the Chinese oil industry in a case that highlights the government's use of vague secrets laws to restrict business information.

'Rotten-egg smell delayed the evolution of animals'

The smell of rotten eggs is off-putting at the best of times, but now scientists believe the same chemical responsible for the awful smell may have held back the evolution of life.

The geologist's view: It could be a gold mine, but not for a long time

Afghanistan has some of the most complex and varied geology in the world. Mining companies have always known about its potential because geologically it lies in a very interesting region. And it has an undeveloped mining industry in comparison with its neighbours. It has incredibly old rocks, some of which are Archean in age (more than 2,500 million years old), and then those are overlain by rocks that are from eras right up to the present day.

Professor John Callomon: Scientist who made major contributions in geology and spectroscopy

John Callomon was a professor at University College, London who was distinguished in two quite different fields: in high-resolution molecular spectroscopy, and geological dating through the study of Jurassic ammonites within stratigraphical palaeontology.

Life in other solar systems 'unpredictable'

Life on Earth-like planets in other solar systems could be unpredictable to say the least, according to a new study.

A Thousand Stars Explode in the Sky, Lyric Hammersmith, London

A case where three heads are better than one

Helicopter sows moss on moors

A rare moss was scattered across remote moorlands from a helicopter yesterday in an effort to help regenerate the moors.

At the Loch of the Green Corrie, By Andrew Greig

Since he was a young writer, Andrew Greig had known the poet Norman MacCaig. Though born in Edinburgh, MacCaig was closely associated with Assynt in Sutherland, an area he often celebrated in his spare, evocative poems.

The men and women in woolly hats who risk their lives to study volcanoes

The riskiest thing most of us do each day is drive to work. But life for a volcanologist is a little more exciting – especially when their object of study starts to grumble angrily in the hot bowels of the earth.

'Tiny' climate changes may trigger quakes

Climate change could spark more "hazardous" geological events such as volcanoes, earthquakes and landslides, scientists warned today.

The natural world: The impact of a dramatic setting in Arizona

In front of me is one of the best preserved impact craters in the world, a giant hole in the sedimentary rocks of the Colorado Plateau, near Flagstaff in Northern Arizona. About 50,000 years ago you would have been in serious trouble if you were standing where I am today; a large iron meteorite, weighing in at perhaps 500,000 tonnes slammed into the Earth's surface at speeds in excess of 11km/s. The most recent studies indicate that this colossal impact released 10-11 megatonnes of energy – over 500 times more than the atomic bomb that exploded over Nagasaki in 1945.

British geologist shot dead during bandit attack in Ethiopia

A British geologist has been shot dead while working for an oil company in Ethiopia, the Foreign Office said. The 39-year-old, named as Jason Read, was killed on Monday near Danot town.

Mankind leaves mark on the planet with the end of the 12,000-year Holocene age

Landmark in the Earth's 4.7bn-year history as geologists hail dawn of the 'human epoch'
News
people'It can last and it's terrifying'
News
people Emma Watson addresses celebrity nude photo leak
News
In this photo illustration a school student eats a hamburger as part of his lunch which was brought from a fast food shop near his school, on October 5, 2005 in London, England. The British government has announced plans to remove junk food from school lunches. From September 2006, food that is high in fat, sugar or salt will be banned from meals and removed from vending machines in schools across England. The move comes in response to a campaign by celebrity TV chef Jamie Oliver to improve school meals.
science
News
Boris Johnson may be manoeuvring to succeed David Cameron
i100
Arts and Entertainment
tv
News
Katie Hopkins appearing on 'This Morning' after she purposefully put on 4 stone.
peopleKatie Hopkins breaks down in tears over weight gain challenge
Life and Style
fashionModel of the moment shoots for first time with catwalk veteran
Life and Style
fashionAngelina Jolie's wedding dressed revealed
News
i100
Sport
Alexis Sanchez, Radamel Falcao, Diego Costa and Mario Balotelli
footballRadamel Falcao and Diego Costa head record £835m influx
Career Services

Day In a Page

Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
Sicily – seven nights from £939pp
Pompeii, Capri and the Bay of Naples - seven nights from £799pp
Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
Mary Rose – two nights from £319pp
'I’ll tell you what I would not serve - lamb and potatoes': US ambassador hits out at stodgy British food served at diplomatic dinners

'I’ll tell you what I would not serve - lamb and potatoes'

US ambassador hits out at stodgy British food
Radio Times female powerlist: A 'revolution' in TV gender roles

A 'revolution' in TV gender roles

Inside the Radio Times female powerlist
Endgame: James Frey's literary treasure hunt

James Frey's literary treasure hunt

Riddling trilogy could net you $3m
Fitbit: Because the tingle feels so good

Fitbit: Because the tingle feels so good

What David Sedaris learnt about the world from his fitness tracker
Saudis risk new Muslim division with proposal to move Mohamed’s tomb

Saudis risk new Muslim division with proposal to move Mohamed’s tomb

Second-holiest site in Islam attracts millions of pilgrims each year
Alexander Fury: The designer names to look for at fashion week this season

The big names to look for this fashion week

This week, designers begin to show their spring 2015 collections in New York
Will Self: 'I like Orwell's writing as much as the next talented mediocrity'

'I like Orwell's writing as much as the next talented mediocrity'

Will Self takes aim at Orwell's rules for writing plain English
Meet Afghanistan's middle-class paint-ballers

Meet Afghanistan's middle-class paint-ballers

Toy guns proving a popular diversion in a country flooded with the real thing
Al Pacino wows Venice

Al Pacino wows Venice

Ham among the brilliance as actor premieres two films at festival
Neil Lawson Baker interview: ‘I’ve gained so much from art. It’s only right to give something back’.

Neil Lawson Baker interview

‘I’ve gained so much from art. It’s only right to give something back’.
The other Mugabe who is lining up for the Zimbabwean presidency

The other Mugabe who is lining up for the Zimbabwean presidency

Wife of President Robert Mugabe appears to have her sights set on succeeding her husband
The model of a gadget launch: Cultivate an atmosphere of mystery and excitement to sell stuff people didn't realise they needed

The model for a gadget launch

Cultivate an atmosphere of mystery and excitement to sell stuff people didn't realise they needed
Alice Roberts: She's done pretty well, for a boffin without a beard

She's done pretty well, for a boffin without a beard

Alice Roberts talks about her new book on evolution - and why her early TV work drew flak from (mostly male) colleagues
Get well soon, Joan Rivers - an inspiration, whether she likes it or not

Get well soon, Joan Rivers

She is awful. But she's also wonderful, not in spite of but because of the fact she's forever saying appalling things, argues Ellen E Jones
Doctor Who Into the Dalek review: A classic sci-fi adventure with all the spectacle of a blockbuster

A fresh take on an old foe

Doctor Who Into the Dalek more than compensated for last week's nonsensical offering