News

Country's Interior Ministry denies responsibility

'Independent' writer honoured

Johann Hari, one of The Independent's most distinguished columnists, has won the 2009 Martha Gellhorn Prize for Journalism.

The Magnificent Spilsbury by Jane Robins

According to George Orwell, the Brides in the Bath murders gave "the greatest... pleasure to the British public". The case, with its unlovely spinsters duped by a conman, climaxed in a courtroom clash between the theatrical "Great Defender" Edward Marshall Hall and the expert witness, pathologist Bernard Spilsbury.

Repo Men (18)

There are plenty of ideas floating around in this bloodcurdling boys' own sci-fi film.

Writer's victory over 'Orwellian' libel laws

Science journalist wins lengthy court battle against chiropractic association

'Independent' journalists nominated for Orwell Prize

Robert Verkaik, The Independent's law editor and home affairs editor and Hamish McRae, associate editor, have been longlisted for the Orwell Prize for journalism, which is judged against George Orwell's aim to "make political writing into an art".

Rare signed George Orwell book fetches £86,000

A rare signed first edition of the first full-length work by author George Orwell has sold for £86,000, auctioneers said today.

Islamophobia on tour: Wilders comes to Britain

A year after his first attempt, the Dutch politician finally brought his message here.

1984, Royal Exchange, Manchester

Orwell's classic as fresh as ever

Book Of A Lifetime: Nineteen Eighty-Four, By George Orwell

Growing up in Sixties suburban London was rather like lying in tepid bathwater for several years. Into this sleepy complacency fell Nineteen Eighty-Four, a book that entrapped me for life. I was on the cusp of adolescence, reading voraciously, gradually testing the limits of my smug world, and bought it in the Popular Book Centre Greenwich, a seedy secondhand shop with a nice line in top-shelf smut. As we were still 15 years away from the novel's date, I naively assumed it would provide futuristic rocket adventures.

Great Works: Christ Pantocrator (circa 1150), Anon

Cefalu Cathedral, Sicily

Read 'em and weep: The literary masters of misery who delight in desolation

Tomorrow is officially the most dispiriting day of the year, but don't even think about fighting it, says James Kidd: it's far more rewarding to embrace the gloom in the company of a masterpiece of misery

Book Of A Lifetime: Essays, By George Orwell

My books of a lifetime vary almost weekly, but most share a certain sprawling, hospitable quality. They overflow with people, stories and ideas, and every time I open them, something different leaps out at me. I like essayists, because they are not constrained by plot and can chatter about anything that enters their heads.

Who owns your e-book?

You've bought a book for your e-reader and it's yours to own, right? That's what George Orwell fans thought, until their purchases disappeared. The implications are sinister, discovers Simon Usborne

Red, Donmar, London<br/>Darker Shores, Hampstead, London<br/>1984, BAC, London

The colour of blood, the colour of money

Leading article: Latin lovers

Should dead languages be resurrected in our primary schools? Some of the great minds of English literature have advised against it. George Orwell doubted "whether classical education ever has been or can be successfully carried out without corporal punishment". William Hazlitt said: "Anyone who has passed through the regular gradations of a classical education, and is not made a fool by it, may consider himself as having had a very narrow escape."

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Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

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If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

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Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

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King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

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Can meditation be bad for you?

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