Arts and Entertainment Treadaway on stage in 'The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time'

The play will resume its West End run from 24 June

Terence Blacker: Reasons to be grateful for the Sixties

In the context of 2010, optimism is not such a disgraceful thing

Hair, Gielgud Theatre, London

Critics always say that the most important element in a musical is the libretto, or book. Audiences don't care about this so much if the music is good, hence the popularity of Verdi, Puccini, and Lloyd Webber.

How does 'Hair' still bring in the bread, man?

In 1968, the squares thought it 'perverted', and to the kids it was phony.

Can you hear me up there?: A night at the theatre isn't such a treat when you sit in the gods

The actors are inaudible and there's a stench of fast food, says Alice Jones

Observations: Highly strung performers want puppetry on their CVs

It's 7.30pm in a dusty hall in north London and 20 people sit in a circle, watching a man try to convince us that his overcoat has come to life. There's just a hint of breath as the coat's back rises and falls, then a head forms from a mass of collar, surveys the room, and causes a collective gasp as it lopes towards us on a gorilla-like sleeve.

Edward Seckerson: The Fur Will Fly

"Avenue Q" - a little show with humongous appeal - celebrated its transfer to the Gielgud Theatre last night with a pool party. None of its furry friends took to the water (Trekkie Monster has a well known aversion to it - it dampens his ardour) but the humans they brought along looked like they might have been tempted had their felted and furry alter egos given them a free hand, so to speak.

Alison Steadman: 'I hear the character in my head'

Candice Marie, Pam, Mrs Bennet and the immortal Beverly – all great roles that only Alison Steadman could have created. But her latest on stage is the toughest yet

Bill Bailey: 'People are obsessed by how I look'

Bill Bailey's talent embraces everything from bloke-in-a-bar gags to Chaucer and Pinter. Where will his quicksilver wit alight next?

Six Characters In Search Of An Author, Gielgud Theatre, London<br />War Horse, National Theatre: Olivier, London

Rupert Goold is a name that will give any project legs at the moment. The award-winning 36-year-old director has a production of No Man's Land, starring Michael Gambon, and the I'd Do Anything-promoted extravaganza of Oliver! lined up for the West End this autumn, and a major production of King Lear with Pete Postlethwaite opening in Liverpool in the same crammed season.

Preview: Strictly Gershwin, Royal Albert Hall, London

Raymond Gubbay, classical-music promoter extraordinaire, is well rounded. Despite having promoted concerts and musical productions in the UK for 40 years – putting on more than 400 shows a year – and catapulting stars such as Pavarotti, Ray Charles and Yehudi Menuhin into the country's biggest arenas, he still finds time to enjoy his six grandchildren, collect antiques and live in his two houses in France. "There is a life way beyond what I do," he says.

You Write The Reviews: God of Carnage, Gielgud Theatre, London

On the strength of the play's title you could be forgiven for expecting a gory epic about the war in Afghanistan or Iraq. In reality, the French playwright Yasmina Reza's new drama is about a domestic kind of bloodletting: between husband and wife, man and woman.

God of Carnage, Gielgud Theatre, London

Imagine a supremely awkward social situation and multiply it by 10. Not today's state meeting between President Bling-Bling and the Queen but the nightmarish scenario cooked up by Yasmina Reza in her new play.

First Night: God Of Carnage, Gielgud Theatre, London

Gasp! Middle-class parents lose their sense of humour

The Pirates of Penzance, Gielgud Theatre, London

Peter Mulloy's feisty period stagings of the Savoy Operas have proved beyond reasonable doubt that you don't need elaborate and gimmicky stage values to raise the necessary chuckles with these well-worn pieces. An experienced crew of singing actors and a strong sense of English eccentricity will do nicely.

Iolanthe, Gielgud Theatre, London

Now that we have established beyond all reasonable doubt that there are fairies in the Palace of Westminster, Gilbert and Sullivan's Iolanthe takes on a renewed vigour. Whether Gilbert knew quite what he was getting into with his tale of peers and peris, of moral tensions between Westminster and Fairyland, we cannot be sure.

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