Health: Obesity linked to poverty

Working class people are more likely to be obese and suffer from high blood pressure than their more affluent neighbours, a government study has found.The poorest people - who live in deprived urban areas mainly in the north - suffer from illness the most.

Anorexia links

Problems with relationships were by far the most common stressful event which preceded the onset of an eating disorder according to findings published in the British Journal of Medical Psychology.

Health: Discovery may help tackle obesity

A signalling mechanism discovered in the brain which governs appetite and metabolism could lead to new treatments for obesity.

Cannabis Campaign: A toke without smoke

The British Medical Association's long-awaited endorsement of cannabis as a potential source for beneficial medicines came with a strong public health warning, writes Graham Ball. In a rider to their influential report The Therapeutic Uses of Cannabis, published last Tuesday, medical experts pointed out that smoking a cannabis joint can lead to three times more tar inhalation than smoking a cigarette.

Paraphernalia: Water features

THE SOUND of running water in a garden is delightfully relaxing and charming. However, if the sight is also to be delightfully relaxing and charming, bear in mind that any water feature where the water is spurting out of something's open jaws at high velocity is more alarming than charming (all-too-popular examples - lion, frog, gargoyle). Crude approximations of peeing cherubs and/ or Grecian maidens carrying brimming pots are also to be avoided.

The facts on fat

Obesity in England doubled between 1980 and 1994 from 6 per cent to 13.8 per cent of men and from 8 per cent to 17.3 per cent of women. Half the adult population is overweight.

No short cut to slimming, say doctors

Slimming pills offer no cure for the overweight and should only be taken by very fat people when all else has failed, specialists say.

Letter: Babies at risk from dioxins

Sir: It has been known for many years that PCBs and dioxins are widespread in our diet and are concentrated in human milk as well as in cows' milk (Briefing, 15 May) and that they take a long time to decay, probably over 10 years.

Letter: Worry about plutonium on Earth before you worry about it in space

Plutonium is the most toxic substance known to man. It has few uses other than for nuclear weapons and satellite power units. It has a half-life in the millions of years. That means it must be stored securely for some multiple of that time without leaking or falling into dangerous hands. Recent events at Sellafield have shown that there is no consensus on the safe Earth-bound disposal of highly toxic and fissile substances. Blasting Plutonium into space, beyond harm, with the benefit of expanding our knowledge and sense of wonder at the universe seems, therefore, a positively sound proposition.

High dioxin levels found in breast-fed babies

High dioxin levels found

Nuclear plant leak injures 43

Forty-three people were taken to hospital after a leak of toxic material at a nuclear centre at Nizhny Novgorod, east of Moscow, Itar- Tass news agency said yesterday.

A little comic relief does wonders for utility shares

People & Business

Family makes pounds 50m as PCB buys Forward

Forward Group, the maker of printed circuit boards, yesterday agreed to a pounds 129m takeover bid from PCB Investments of the US, a deal that will yield more than pounds 50m for Raymond Chamberlain, chairman, and other family members. The 230p-per-share bid comes just three months after Forward's shares were sent plunging from 263p to 110p after the company issued a profits warning.

Farewell to misery of poison gas

`Dulce et Decorum Est' by Wildred Owen*
Career Services

Day In a Page

Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Dubrovnik, the Dalmatian Coast & Montenegro
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Lisbon, Oporto and the Douro Valley
Lake Garda, Venice & Verona
Spain
Prices correct as of 23 January 2015
Isis hostage crisis: The prisoner swap has only one purpose for the militants - recognition its Islamic State exists and that foreign nations acknowledge its power

Isis hostage crisis

The prisoner swap has only one purpose for the militants - recognition its Islamic State exists and that foreign nations acknowledge its power, says Robert Fisk
Missing salvage expert who found $50m of sunken treasure before disappearing, tracked down at last

The runaway buccaneers and the ship full of gold

Salvage expert Tommy Thompson found sunken treasure worth millions. Then he vanished... until now
Homeless Veterans appeal: ‘If you’re hard on the world you are hard on yourself’

Homeless Veterans appeal: ‘If you’re hard on the world you are hard on yourself’

Maverick artist Grayson Perry backs our campaign
Assisted Dying Bill: I want to be able to decide about my own death - I want to have control of my life

Assisted Dying Bill: 'I want control of my life'

This week the Assisted Dying Bill is debated in the Lords. Virginia Ironside, who has already made plans for her own self-deliverance, argues that it's time we allowed people a humane, compassionate death
Move over, kale - cabbage is the new rising star

Cabbage is king again

Sophie Morris banishes thoughts of soggy school dinners and turns over a new leaf
11 best winter skin treats

Give your moisturiser a helping hand: 11 best winter skin treats

Get an extra boost of nourishment from one of these hard-working products
Paul Scholes column: The more Jose Mourinho attempts to influence match officials, the more they are likely to ignore him

Paul Scholes column

The more Jose Mourinho attempts to influence match officials, the more they are likely to ignore him
Frank Warren column: No cigar, but pots of money: here come the Cubans

Frank Warren's Ringside

No cigar, but pots of money: here come the Cubans
Isis hostage crisis: Militant group stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

Isis stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

The jihadis are being squeezed militarily and economically, but there is no sign of an implosion, says Patrick Cockburn
Virtual reality thrusts viewers into the frontline of global events - and puts film-goers at the heart of the action

Virtual reality: Seeing is believing

Virtual reality thrusts viewers into the frontline of global events - and puts film-goers at the heart of the action
Homeless Veterans appeal: MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’

Homeless Veterans appeal

MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’ to help
Larry David, Steve Coogan and other comedians share stories of depression in new documentary

Comedians share stories of depression

The director of the new documentary, Kevin Pollak, tells Jessica Barrett how he got them to talk
Has The Archers lost the plot with it's spicy storylines?

Has The Archers lost the plot?

A growing number of listeners are voicing their discontent over the rural soap's spicy storylines; so loudly that even the BBC's director-general seems worried, says Simon Kelner
English Heritage adds 14 post-war office buildings to its protected lists

14 office buildings added to protected lists

Christopher Beanland explores the underrated appeal of these palaces of pen-pushing
Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Scientists unearthed the cranial fragments from Manot Cave in West Galilee