Health: Obesity linked to poverty

Working class people are more likely to be obese and suffer from high blood pressure than their more affluent neighbours, a government study has found.The poorest people - who live in deprived urban areas mainly in the north - suffer from illness the most.

Anorexia links

Problems with relationships were by far the most common stressful event which preceded the onset of an eating disorder according to findings published in the British Journal of Medical Psychology.

Health: Discovery may help tackle obesity

A signalling mechanism discovered in the brain which governs appetite and metabolism could lead to new treatments for obesity.

Cannabis Campaign: A toke without smoke

The British Medical Association's long-awaited endorsement of cannabis as a potential source for beneficial medicines came with a strong public health warning, writes Graham Ball. In a rider to their influential report The Therapeutic Uses of Cannabis, published last Tuesday, medical experts pointed out that smoking a cannabis joint can lead to three times more tar inhalation than smoking a cigarette.

Paraphernalia: Water features

THE SOUND of running water in a garden is delightfully relaxing and charming. However, if the sight is also to be delightfully relaxing and charming, bear in mind that any water feature where the water is spurting out of something's open jaws at high velocity is more alarming than charming (all-too-popular examples - lion, frog, gargoyle). Crude approximations of peeing cherubs and/ or Grecian maidens carrying brimming pots are also to be avoided.

The facts on fat

Obesity in England doubled between 1980 and 1994 from 6 per cent to 13.8 per cent of men and from 8 per cent to 17.3 per cent of women. Half the adult population is overweight.

No short cut to slimming, say doctors

Slimming pills offer no cure for the overweight and should only be taken by very fat people when all else has failed, specialists say.

Letter: Babies at risk from dioxins

Sir: It has been known for many years that PCBs and dioxins are widespread in our diet and are concentrated in human milk as well as in cows' milk (Briefing, 15 May) and that they take a long time to decay, probably over 10 years.

Letter: Worry about plutonium on Earth before you worry about it in space

Plutonium is the most toxic substance known to man. It has few uses other than for nuclear weapons and satellite power units. It has a half-life in the millions of years. That means it must be stored securely for some multiple of that time without leaking or falling into dangerous hands. Recent events at Sellafield have shown that there is no consensus on the safe Earth-bound disposal of highly toxic and fissile substances. Blasting Plutonium into space, beyond harm, with the benefit of expanding our knowledge and sense of wonder at the universe seems, therefore, a positively sound proposition.

High dioxin levels found in breast-fed babies

High dioxin levels found

Nuclear plant leak injures 43

Forty-three people were taken to hospital after a leak of toxic material at a nuclear centre at Nizhny Novgorod, east of Moscow, Itar- Tass news agency said yesterday.

A little comic relief does wonders for utility shares

People & Business

Family makes pounds 50m as PCB buys Forward

Forward Group, the maker of printed circuit boards, yesterday agreed to a pounds 129m takeover bid from PCB Investments of the US, a deal that will yield more than pounds 50m for Raymond Chamberlain, chairman, and other family members. The 230p-per-share bid comes just three months after Forward's shares were sent plunging from 263p to 110p after the company issued a profits warning.

Farewell to misery of poison gas

`Dulce et Decorum Est' by Wildred Owen*
Arts and Entertainment
books
Voices
Caustic she may be, but Joan Rivers is a feminist hero, whether she likes it or not
voicesShe's an inspiration, whether she likes it or not, says Ellen E Jones
Arts and Entertainment
The Doctor and the Dalek meet
tvReview: Doctor Who Into the Dalek more than compensated for last week's nonsensical offering
Sport
Diego Costa
footballEverton 3 Chelsea 6: Diego Costa double has manager purring
Life and Style
3D printed bump keys can access almost any lock
techSoftware needs photo of lock and not much more
Arts and Entertainment
The 'three chords and the truth gal' performing at the Cornbury Music Festival, Oxford, earlier this summer
music... so how did she become country music's hottest new star?
Life and Style
The spy mistress-general: A lecturer in nutritional therapy in her modern life, Heather Rosa favours a Byzantine look topped off with a squid and a schooner
fashionEurope's biggest steampunk convention heads to Lincoln
News
Dr Alice Roberts in front of a
peopleAlice Roberts talks about her new book on evolution - and why her early TV work drew flak from (mostly male) colleagues
News
i100
Arts and Entertainment
Star turns: Montacute House
tv
Career Services

Day In a Page

Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
Sicily – seven nights from £939pp
Pompeii, Capri and the Bay of Naples - seven nights from £799pp
Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
Mary Rose – two nights from £319pp
The other Mugabe who is lining up for the Zimbabwean presidency

The other Mugabe who is lining up for the Zimbabwean presidency

Wife of President Robert Mugabe appears to have her sights set on succeeding her husband
The model of a gadget launch: Cultivate an atmosphere of mystery and excitement to sell stuff people didn't realise they needed

The model for a gadget launch

Cultivate an atmosphere of mystery and excitement to sell stuff people didn't realise they needed
Alice Roberts: She's done pretty well, for a boffin without a beard

She's done pretty well, for a boffin without a beard

Alice Roberts talks about her new book on evolution - and why her early TV work drew flak from (mostly male) colleagues
Get well soon, Joan Rivers - an inspiration, whether she likes it or not

Get well soon, Joan Rivers

She is awful. But she's also wonderful, not in spite of but because of the fact she's forever saying appalling things, argues Ellen E Jones
Doctor Who Into the Dalek review: A classic sci-fi adventure with all the spectacle of a blockbuster

A fresh take on an old foe

Doctor Who Into the Dalek more than compensated for last week's nonsensical offering
Fashion walks away from the celebrity runway show

Fashion walks away from the celebrity runway show

As the collections start, fashion editor Alexander Fury finds video and the internet are proving more attractive
Meet the stars of TV's Wolf Hall... and it's not the cast of the Tudor trilogy

Meet the stars of TV's Wolf Hall...

... and it's not the cast of the Tudor trilogy
Weekend at the Asylum: Europe's biggest steampunk convention heads to Lincoln

Europe's biggest steampunk convention

Jake Wallis Simons discovers how Victorian ray guns and the martial art of biscuit dunking are precisely what the 21st century needs
Don't swallow the tripe – a user's guide to weasel words

Don't swallow the tripe – a user's guide to weasel words

Lying is dangerous and unnecessary. A new book explains the strategies needed to avoid it. John Rentoul on the art of 'uncommunication'
Daddy, who was Richard Attenborough? Was the beloved thespian the last of the cross-generation stars?

Daddy, who was Richard Attenborough?

The atomisation of culture means that few of those we regard as stars are universally loved any more, says DJ Taylor
She's dark, sarcastic, and bashes life in Nowheresville ... so how did Kacey Musgraves become country music's hottest new star?

Kacey Musgraves: Nashville's hottest new star

The singer has two Grammys for her first album under her belt and her celebrity fans include Willie Nelson, Ryan Adams and Katy Perry
American soldier-poet Brian Turner reveals the enduring turmoil that inspired his memoir

Soldier-poet Brian Turner on his new memoir

James Kidd meets the prize-winning writer, whose new memoir takes him back to the bloody battles he fought in Iraq
Aston Villa vs Hull match preview: Villa were not surprised that Ron Vlaar was a World Cup star

Villa were not surprised that Vlaar was a World Cup star

Andi Weimann reveals just how good his Dutch teammate really is
Bill Granger recipes: Our chef ekes out his holiday in Italy with divine, simple salads

Bill Granger's simple Italian salads

Our chef presents his own version of Italian dishes, taking in the flavours and produce that inspired him while he was in the country
The Last Word: Tumbleweed through deserted stands and suites at Wembley

The Last Word: Tumbleweed through deserted stands and suites at Wembley

If supporters begin to close bank accounts, switch broadband suppliers or shun satellite sales, their voices will be heard. It’s time for revolution