Arts and Entertainment

Shepherds Bush Empire, London

Cross Words: Battle of the bands

Head to head: Is the cover album the ultimate tribute or tragic rip-off? Stephen McGann of The McGanns defends their debut album against Tony Szuminski of Puressence

Music: Genius plus Jaco equals pain

Jaco Pastorius hailed himself the greatest bassist in the world. He was also manic depressive and he died forgotten and alone. But was this the inevitable price of his brilliance?

Pop: They came to be blown away

M OToRHEAD

Outlook: PowerGen still has ambitions

STOCK MARKET attention may be more on National Power right now, but these are also interesting times for PowerGen. Speculation about a break-up bid for National Power has put its slightly smaller brother in the shade. But Ed Wallis, PowerGen's combative chairman, is back from holiday and itching to get going again.

What a lovely rebirth for the Roundhouse

THE Roundhouse, the famous north London theatre and rock venue which has been disused for 16 years, is to be reborn.

Jazz: Come on Jose, light our fires

THOUGH EVERYONE knows Jose Feliciano's wonderfully slack, slowed- down and jazz-inflected version of the Doors' "Light My Fire" - his big breakthrough hit 30 years ago - but most of us know little else. There is a vague memory of the "genius" tag with which he was once promoted, a heavy rep that sightless singers in the 1960s almost seemed to be burdened with as a matter of course. If Ray Charles was the genius of soul, and Stevie Wonder was, well, another one, Jose Feliciano was their Latin cousin, the blind Puerto Rican boy brought up in a family of 12 in Spanish Harlem who overcame adversity by singing and playing the guitar. The part of the story that we maybe didn't get, although if you were listening it must have been evident all along, is that Feliciano doesn't just play his guitar: he pretty much re-invents it.

Pop: Look forwards in anger

60ft Dolls ICA, London

Books: This really is Spinal Tap

FLESH GUITAR by Geoff Nicholson, Gollancz pounds 9.99

After Dark: The End of the road

No sooner had The End completed its successful 1997 World Tour (taking them as far as Portugal, France, Holland, Slovenia, Ireland, Philadelphia, New York, San Francisco and Berlin) that they decided they needed a more exotic location. They finally settled on Old Blighty and embarked on The Electric Ladyland Tour 1998, hitting 12 venues across the UK.

POP: Back on the right track

Question. Who wrote "Wild Thing"? Was it? a) Jimi Hendrix? b) Graham Nash? c) The Troggs?

Heaven knows he's miserable now

Reasons for Sean Hughes to be miserable: one, two, three. One: "your parents lie to you when you're 10. They say you're gonna get married, have kids... and I, like an idiot, believed it all". Two: "the bubbly people in the bar on TFI Friday who are so delighted to be part of that inaneness". Three: New Labour's vision of shiny, happy morons watching television - a medium watched by "stupid people". Dissing marriage, Evans sycophants and Blairism is fair enough - if somewhat obligatory - these days, but isn't it a mite hypocritical to bite the hand that feeds you? After all it was the telly - or "opium of the masses" as Hughes puts it - that brought his maudlin humour, puppy-dog expression and come-to-bed eyes to national attention. That was the springboard to more meaningful pursuits like poetry, novel-writing and acting. That allowed him "a brilliant opportunity to focus in on ideas and talk about stuff I'd never been able to talk about before".

Music and radio on television

In a peak week for great Elgarians, Nigel Kennedy had first go on the South Bank Show (Sun, ITV). That he played Jimi Hendrix fantasies rather than Elgar this time was all to the good. By presenting himself with a creative dimension that classical virtuosi usually hide, he was able to show explicitly how he gets under the skin of the musicians he empathises with.

1968: The culture

1968. THE YEAR before the counterculture became commercial. Rock'n'roll heroes were still playing gigs up and down the country and crashing their Trannies on the way back down the M1. You could pull a musician from the front of house in 1968; he was so close he could actually look into your eyes. The watering-holes were few and you could cover them all. At the Macrobiotic Restaurant, the Chelsea antiques market, the Speakeasy, the Fillmores East and West and Max's Kansas City you saw everybody, sooner or later. Everybody had hair and lots of it, floating round their heads like smoke. Damsels with dulcimers were everywhere. The tits were real then and heterosex was still exciting, even without poppers.

Music: Album Round-up

GOLDIE Saturnzreturn (London 828990 2)

Music: Rose who endured a life of thorns

Tim Rose is famous for missing the boat: for writing the song that made Jimi Hendrix; for turning down one by Bob Dylan. But, writes Glyn Brown, he's by no means finished yet.
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Day In a Page

Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
Sicily – seven nights from £939pp
Pompeii, Capri and the Bay of Naples - seven nights from £799pp
Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
Mary Rose – two nights from £319pp
Save the tiger: The animals bred for bones on China’s tiger farms

The animals bred for bones on China’s tiger farms

The big cats kept in captivity to perform for paying audiences and then, when dead, their bodies used to fortify wine
A former custard factory, a Midlands bog and a Leeds cemetery all included in top 50 hidden spots in the UK

A former custard factory, a Midlands bog and a Leeds cemetery

Introducing the top 50 hidden spots in Britain
Ebola epidemic: Plagued by fear

Ebola epidemic: Plagued by fear

How a disease that has claimed fewer than 2,000 victims in its history has earned a place in the darkest corner of the public's imagination
Chris Pratt: From 'Parks and Recreation' to 'Guardians of the Galaxy'

From 'Parks and Recreation' to 'Guardians of the Galaxy'

He was homeless in Hawaii when he got his big break. Now the comic actor Chris Pratt is Hollywood's new favourite action star
How live cinema screenings can boost arts audiences

How live cinema screenings can boost arts audiences

Broadcasting plays and exhibitions to cinemas is a sure-fire box office smash
Shipping container hotels: Pop-up hotels filling a niche

Pop-up hotels filling a niche

Spending the night in a shipping container doesn't sound appealing, but these mobile crash pads are popping up at the summer's biggest events
Native American headdresses are not fashion accessories

Feather dust-up

A Canadian festival has banned Native American headwear. Haven't we been here before?
Boris Johnson's war on diesel

Boris Johnson's war on diesel

11m cars here run on diesel. It's seen as a greener alternative to unleaded petrol. So why is London's mayor on a crusade against the black pump?
5 best waterproof cameras

Splash and flash: 5 best waterproof cameras

Don't let water stop you taking snaps with one of these machines that will take you from the sand to meters deep
Louis van Gaal interview: Manchester United manager discusses tactics and rebuilding after the David Moyes era

Louis van Gaal interview

Manchester United manager discusses tactics and rebuilding after the David Moyes era
Will Gore: The goodwill shown by fans towards Alastair Cook will evaporate rapidly if India win the series

Will Gore: Outside Edge

The goodwill shown by fans towards Alastair Cook will evaporate rapidly if India win the series
The children were playing in the street with toy guns. The air strikes were tragically real

The air strikes were tragically real

The children were playing in the street with toy guns
Boozy, ignorant, intolerant, but very polite – The British, as others see us

Britain as others see us

Boozy, ignorant, intolerant, but very polite
How did our legends really begin?

How did our legends really begin?

Applying the theory of evolution to the world's many mythologies
Watch out: Lambrusco is back on the menu

Lambrusco is back on the menu

Naff Seventies corner-shop staple is this year's Aperol Spritz