Arts and Entertainment

You might assume that the participants in the BBC4 documentary God's Cadets: Joining the Salvation Army would all be classic "lark" types, but there was a greater variety of personality than expected in this 90-minute film. It followed the pious, but not pompous "cadets" who had given up their lives to enter into two years of intensive officer training at the William Booth College in south London.

Tube fares hike adds to strike woes

Visual arts: Final departure from King's Cross?

The artist-run Cubbitt, a rare free spirit among galleries and a nursery of talent, is under threat.

King's Cross vice defies the cameras

BRITAIN'S MOST expensive and well-publicised crackdown on drug- induced crime is failing. A report drawn up by Camden council in north London admits that prostitution has increased and street crime has soared around the notorious King's Cross station area.

Letter: Chariot on the A5

Sir: Queen Boudicca is as likely to have died at King's Cross "waiting for a train to Royston" (Historical Notes, 15 July, letters, 27, 28 July) as to lie buried beneath any of its platforms. Douglas Greenwood rehearses the commonly held myth of an imagined battle at "King's Cross", probably dreamed up by Victorian antiquarians.

Letter: Boadicea's platform

Sir: Not wishing to join the debate about which particular platform at King's Cross the bones of Boadicea rest beneath (letter, 27 July), we can all be confident that too many old chariots appear above.

Historical Notes: Boadicea's bones under Platform 10

TAKING A photograph of the drab old Platform 10 at King's Cross station, I told a quick-witted chap that Boadicea's bones lay buried under it. He quipped, "Did she die waiting for a train to Royston?"

Family Affair: Kid sister who calls me mum

Melanie and Vicky Charlesworth are sisters. Melanie, 23, is also 14-year-old Vicky's legal foster-mother. They live in Holloway, London, with Melanie's 18-month-old son Tashan

Family Affair: We fled to the woods to safety

Durim Kadiu, 18, and his cousin Tahir Selmani, 13, were

Arsenal pitches for King's Cross

Football club believed to have bought an option on derelict central London site to build new stadium

Victim left with fear of blacks awarded pounds 600,000

AN ASIAN man who developed a paranoid fear of black people after he was viciously attacked was yesterday awarded nearly pounds 600,000 in damages and told to go and live in a place where there are no blacks.

Travel UK: Such success, opulence and perfection!

So, do architects really live in minimalist houses that are a homage to chrome? Well, some of them do, as Peter Conchie discovered on a new London tour

Prostitute dies of overdose - at 13

ALIYAH ISMAIL was a homeless prostitute, hooked on methadone, desperate for money and exploited by dozens of men. She died of a drugs overdose, alone on a threadbare blanket in a derelict building in the red light district of King's Cross. She was just 13 years old.
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Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine