Kylie Minogue

Alt-J, Electric Ballroom, London

There's a rumble throughout much of Alt-J's set: it's the sort of dubstep, bass heavy production that makes them sound oh-so 'now', layered as it is under folky guitar and vocal harmonies. Think James Blake meets Mumford & Sons (but please, let's refrain from the tag 'folk-step', a term more juddering than their basslines).

Diary: 'Hurly' Burley's racy ladies

Though keen to work my way through all 424 pages of Kay "Hurly" Burley's debut novel First Ladies, I must confess to having been waylaid by its acknowledgements section: a revealing roll call of the company Ms Burley keeps when she's not on Sky News encouraging celebrity divorcees to blub. The erstwhile ice dancer's first two thank-yous go to fellow chick-lit authors Tasmina Perry and Kathy Lette, who obligingly provided First Ladies with pre-publication puff quotes. Lord Mandelson, too, merits Ms Burley's gratitude, and claims on the cover that she "uses her unrivalled knowledge of the worlds of politics, media and celebrity to racy effect". (Yes, Peter, but is it any good?) Also thanked profusely are former taoiseach Bertie Ahern, who left office under a cloud of (alleged) dubious financial dealings; Damian McBride, who left Gordon Brown's employ when he was caught discussing whether to spread scandalous tales about the private lives of Tories; and Lord Archer, who was jailed for perjury. If you need help creating a work of fiction, I suppose there are worse people to ask.

The Week In Radio: When the appliance of science is hot stuff

One question guaranteed not to come up in the leaders' debate tonight is "What will happen to BBC radio under your leadership?" But even if it did, the answer from all three would be so similar that they might as well be reading from the same cue card. Despite testing times ahead, with huge question marks over the licence fee and the scope of the Corporation's activities, the BBC would get the same kidglove treatment as the NHS or the Pope. Gordon Brown would like the BBC "independent" and Nick Clegg wants it "securely funded". Even the Conservatives, who want the licence fee supervised by the National Audit Office and the BBC Trust abolished, talk of a "strong and independent BBC". And no one would mention the World Service, which rarely gets the recognition it deserves, despite being our greatest cultural export after Shakespeare.

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Ladyhawke: 'You have no idea what I have been through'

She hated physical contact, shunned company and once locked herself in her house for three months. Then, two years ago, Pip Brown was diagnosed with Asperger's syndrome. So how is she coping with life as Ladyhawke, the next big thing in pop?