Arts and Entertainment

Does success in one genre guarantee it in another?

The Week In Books: Once upon a time in a field at a festival

Once upon a time, before the amazon Kindle, before the Penguin mass market paperback and before the Gutenberg printing press, stories belonged to the people and they got them from storytellers. There were wandering troubadours instead of Waterstone's and ballads rather than Big Brother, and the "revolutionary new e-ink" would have seemed as far-fetched as the "revolutionary new ink". Now things are different: books come with a battery life measured in units of War and Peace and stories can come with you everywhere except in the bath or the rain. But the storytellers haven't gone away.

The Big Chill, Eastnor Castle Deer Park, Malvern

It sparkles like a rare diamond and its contents are sought after by millions. Yes, ladies and gentleman, Noel Fielding's jumpsuit has landed. It was not a musical act that filled the Saturday night slot of this family-friendly musical festival in Herefordshire, but a surrealist comedy duo who were greeted with as many bamboozled silences as outpourings of laughter. But if there was an element of the emperor's new clothes to 10,000 people standing around slightly confused to watch Fielding and Julian Barratt's Mighty Boosh take us through a "musical journey", then it was just one stop on an otherwise successful weekend.

You Write The Reviews: Rufus Wainwright, Wollaton Park, Nottingham

It would be fair to say that festivals present challenges for an artist. First, they are not playing to a fully partisan crowd, and second, they are restricted by time constraints and the logistics of equipment and entourage. Festivals, then, are a measure of a performer's ability to make the conditions work for them.

Knifed on my street: The ugly divide that ravages our capital city

We lived side by side, but in parallel universes

You Write The Reviews: Leonard Cohen, Opera House, Manchester

This was never going to be just a concert. Communion with the man whose emotional and spiritual quests have provided the GPS mapping for more than one generation is, in fact, more of an act of worship.

Leonard Cohen, Opera House, Manchester<br/>Grace Jones, Royal Festival Hall, London

At 73, Leonard Cohen can still put on a hell of a show while Grace Jones, at a mere 60, menaces in a G-string

First Night: Leonard Cohen, Opera House, Manchester

A happy return for the master of misery

Leonard Cohen: Out of the monastery and back on the road

The womanising, the four bottles of wine a day and the five-year retreat in a Buddhist monastery are all behind him. This week, Leonard Cohen embarks on his first British tour for 15 years. And the former poet laureate of despair might even be singing with a smile on his face...

Coppell thankful for last chance to stay up

It was in his trademark dour tone (two octaves lower than Leonard Cohen) that Steve Coppell last night issued his rallying call in Reading's fight for Premier League survival. "Just be grateful that after the season we've had we still have this opportunity to stay up," he declared.

Cultural Life: Fyfe Dangerfield, Musician

Books
I start so many books and then get distracted. I've just read The Diving Bell and the Butterfly. It is the story of Jean-Dominique Bauby, who wrote the book by blinking the letters of the alphabet because he was paralysed everywhere else. It is strange how uplifting it is to read – it makes you appreciate the small things in life. The other book I've read is The Road by Cormac McCarthy. It is about the end of the world, and describes a journey taken by a father and son. As post-apocalyptic survivors, they wander through America. It's quite a long book but is aimless because what are they walking towards? They are walking to stay alive. Both of these books get to the root of what it means to be alive.

Still miserable after all these years, Cohen goes back on tour

Leonard Cohen, the troubadour of melancholy whose career as a poet, writer and musician has spanned more than half a century, is to embark on a world tour featuring eight dates in Britain.

KD Lang, Royal Concert Hall, Glasgow<field name="starRating">threestar</field>

If an artist's second album is the tricky one, perhaps kd lang might enlighten us as to how the next eight go. Her wariness at the reaction to Watershed – record number 10 in a two-decade-plus career – was obvious here the day after its release, at the first show of a worldwide tour.

Joanna Adams: Just upstairs, and horribly at risk

What can we do when our children are so tormented that they harm &ndash; or even kill &ndash; themselves? Joanna Adams discovered by looking at her daughter's blog that her child was in trouble

Four-letter Word: New Love Letters, Ed. by Joshua Knelman & Rosalind Porter

Golden rule of writing love letters is ignored by this gang of professionals
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London Marathon 2015: Kenya's brothers in arms Wilson Kipsang and Dennis Kimetto ready to take on world

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Natalie Bennett interview: I've lost track of the last time I saw my Dad but it's not because I refuse to fly

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