Arts and Entertainment

Does success in one genre guarantee it in another?

The Week In Books: Once upon a time in a field at a festival

Once upon a time, before the amazon Kindle, before the Penguin mass market paperback and before the Gutenberg printing press, stories belonged to the people and they got them from storytellers. There were wandering troubadours instead of Waterstone's and ballads rather than Big Brother, and the "revolutionary new e-ink" would have seemed as far-fetched as the "revolutionary new ink". Now things are different: books come with a battery life measured in units of War and Peace and stories can come with you everywhere except in the bath or the rain. But the storytellers haven't gone away.

The Big Chill, Eastnor Castle Deer Park, Malvern

It sparkles like a rare diamond and its contents are sought after by millions. Yes, ladies and gentleman, Noel Fielding's jumpsuit has landed. It was not a musical act that filled the Saturday night slot of this family-friendly musical festival in Herefordshire, but a surrealist comedy duo who were greeted with as many bamboozled silences as outpourings of laughter. But if there was an element of the emperor's new clothes to 10,000 people standing around slightly confused to watch Fielding and Julian Barratt's Mighty Boosh take us through a "musical journey", then it was just one stop on an otherwise successful weekend.

You Write The Reviews: Rufus Wainwright, Wollaton Park, Nottingham

It would be fair to say that festivals present challenges for an artist. First, they are not playing to a fully partisan crowd, and second, they are restricted by time constraints and the logistics of equipment and entourage. Festivals, then, are a measure of a performer's ability to make the conditions work for them.

Knifed on my street: The ugly divide that ravages our capital city

We lived side by side, but in parallel universes

You Write The Reviews: Leonard Cohen, Opera House, Manchester

This was never going to be just a concert. Communion with the man whose emotional and spiritual quests have provided the GPS mapping for more than one generation is, in fact, more of an act of worship.

Leonard Cohen, Opera House, Manchester<br/>Grace Jones, Royal Festival Hall, London

At 73, Leonard Cohen can still put on a hell of a show while Grace Jones, at a mere 60, menaces in a G-string

First Night: Leonard Cohen, Opera House, Manchester

A happy return for the master of misery

Leonard Cohen: Out of the monastery and back on the road

The womanising, the four bottles of wine a day and the five-year retreat in a Buddhist monastery are all behind him. This week, Leonard Cohen embarks on his first British tour for 15 years. And the former poet laureate of despair might even be singing with a smile on his face...

Coppell thankful for last chance to stay up

It was in his trademark dour tone (two octaves lower than Leonard Cohen) that Steve Coppell last night issued his rallying call in Reading's fight for Premier League survival. "Just be grateful that after the season we've had we still have this opportunity to stay up," he declared.

Cultural Life: Fyfe Dangerfield, Musician

Books
I start so many books and then get distracted. I've just read The Diving Bell and the Butterfly. It is the story of Jean-Dominique Bauby, who wrote the book by blinking the letters of the alphabet because he was paralysed everywhere else. It is strange how uplifting it is to read – it makes you appreciate the small things in life. The other book I've read is The Road by Cormac McCarthy. It is about the end of the world, and describes a journey taken by a father and son. As post-apocalyptic survivors, they wander through America. It's quite a long book but is aimless because what are they walking towards? They are walking to stay alive. Both of these books get to the root of what it means to be alive.

Still miserable after all these years, Cohen goes back on tour

Leonard Cohen, the troubadour of melancholy whose career as a poet, writer and musician has spanned more than half a century, is to embark on a world tour featuring eight dates in Britain.

KD Lang, Royal Concert Hall, Glasgow<field name="starRating">threestar</field>

If an artist's second album is the tricky one, perhaps kd lang might enlighten us as to how the next eight go. Her wariness at the reaction to Watershed – record number 10 in a two-decade-plus career – was obvious here the day after its release, at the first show of a worldwide tour.

Joanna Adams: Just upstairs, and horribly at risk

What can we do when our children are so tormented that they harm &ndash; or even kill &ndash; themselves? Joanna Adams discovered by looking at her daughter's blog that her child was in trouble

Four-letter Word: New Love Letters, Ed. by Joshua Knelman & Rosalind Porter

Golden rule of writing love letters is ignored by this gang of professionals
Voices
Stephanie first after her public appearance as a woman at Rad Fest 2014
voices

Arts and Entertainment
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Oscar Pistorius is led out of court in Pretoria. Pistorius received a five-year prison sentence for culpable homicide by judge Thokozile Masipais for the killing of his girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp
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Russell Brand at an anti-austerity march in June
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Like Madonna, Sister Cristina Scuccia's video is also set in Venice

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James Blunt's debut album Back to Bedlam shot him to fame in 2004
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Singer says the track was 'force-fed down people's throats'

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The Tinder app has around 10 million users worldwide

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Endangered species spotted in a creek in the Qinling mountains

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Two super-sized ships have cruised into British waters, but how big can these behemoths get?

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Two of the largest vessels in the world cruised into UK waters last week
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Sufferers can now be offered the possibility of cure thanks to a revolutionary implant of regenerative cells
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Will there be an all-female mission to Mars?

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If Oscar Pistorius is sent to jail, his experience will not be that of other inmates
James Wharton: The former Guard now fighting discrimination against gay soldiers

The former Guard now fighting discrimination against gay soldiers

Life after the Army has brought new battles for the LGBT activist James Wharton
Ebola in the US: Panic over the virus threatens to infect President Obama's midterms

Panic over Ebola threatens to infect the midterms

Just one person has died, yet November's elections may be affected by what Republicans call 'Obama's Katrina', says Rupert Cornwell
Premier League coaches join the RSC to swap the tricks of their trades

Darling, you were fabulous! But offside...

Premier League coaches are joining the RSC to learn acting skills, and in turn they will teach its actors to play football. Nick Clark finds out why
How to dress with authority: Kirsty Wark and Camila Batmanghelidjh discuss the changing role of fashion in women's workwear

How to dress with authority

Kirsty Wark and Camila Batmanghelidjh discuss the changing role of fashion in women's workwear
New book on Joy Division's Ian Curtis sheds new light on the life of the late singer

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'Joy Division were making art... Ian was for real' says author Jon Savage
Sean Harris: A rare interview with British acting's secret weapon

Sean Harris: A rare interview with British acting's secret weapon

The Bafta-winner talks Hollywood, being branded a psycho, and how Barbra Streisand is his true inspiration
Tim Minchin, interview: The musician, comedian and world's favourite ginger is on scorching form

Tim Minchin interview

For a no-holds-barred comedian who is scathing about woolly thinking and oppressive religiosity, he is surprisingly gentle in person
Boris Johnson's boozing won't win the puritan vote

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Ash frontman Tim Wheeler reveals how he came to terms with his father's dementia

Tim Wheeler: Alzheimer's, memories and my dad

Wheeler's dad suffered from Alzheimer's for three years. When he died, there was only one way the Ash frontman knew how to respond: with a heartfelt solo album