Arts and Entertainment Strum as you are: Kurt Cobain

What is the best gig you've been to at Brixton Academy? Perhaps it's Public Enemy, or The Smiths' final show in 1986? Simon Parkes bought the seminal venue for £1 in 1982 and what stories he has to tell in his new memoir Live at the Brixton Academy: a Riotous Life in the Music Business.

Paul O’Grady, is best known for his drag queen comedic alter ego, Lily Savage

Michael McIntyre? Can’t we give a chat show to Paul O’Grady instead?

He took on bigots dressed in drag  as Lily Savage in the 1980s. Now the comedian is speaking up for the plight of people on benefits

'Robot dragonfly' is the smallest and lightest self-navigating drone

The miniature robot weighs just 20g and can fly without human guidance; it could map abandoned buildings or masquerade as a fairy at a theme park

Comedy books for Christmas

Sometimes it can be empowering to know you have nothing left to lose – that, at least, is the theory behind the birth of “my nemesis and my deliverer”, as Michael Pennington describes his alter ego in Becoming Johnny Vegas (HarperCollins, £20). In a thoroughly entertaining memoir, Pennington is also acute in his psychological evisceration of his own drunken shambles of an act.

High spirits: comedian Pippa Evans, co-founder of the Sunday Assembly

The Week in Comedy: All smiles on Sunday with a radical take on religion

It wasn't your average Advent Sunday service. It started with a rousing chorus of Queen's 'Don't Stop Me Now' and ended with Abba's 'Waterloo'. In between there was a poem dedicated to Tony Wilson, a mini rave and a Danish clapping game. This was Sunday Assembly, a "godless church" which has one aim - to celebrate life. It has all the trappings of a traditional Sunday service – a sermon, songs, readings, community notices, a collection, tea and cakes – but none of the religion. Its only creed is live better, help often, wonder more.

Rescuers lift the police helicopter wreckage from the roof of the The Clutha Pub in Glasgow, Scotland

Glasgow helicopter crash: death toll rises to nine

The wreckage of the helicopter was removed from the site this morning as investigators said the pilot put out no mayday calls before the crash

Cate Le Bon, gig review: 'distinctive yet charming'

Bush Hall, London

An aerial shot of the newly-opened ice rink at Somerset House in central London

In pictures: Somerset House opens a new illuminating ice rink ahead of Christmas

The eighteenth-century courtyard at Somerset House presents 900-metre-square ice rink with one of the most remarkable skating scenery in London.

The Bonus Track: Bronski Beat, Zoë Kravitz and Jake Bugg

A sideways look at the world of music

'I've been catching up on Breaking Bad and Orange is the New Black. I'm glued, long into the night': The novelist Fay Weldon

Cultural life: Fay Weldon, novelist

'I've been catching up on Breaking Bad and Orange is the New Black. I'm glued, long into the night'

Ozzy Osbourne - Birmingham's ideal Rock Tsar?

Should Ozzy Osbourne become Birmingham's first official Rock Tsar?

A Government-backed report certainly suggests so, as it's revealed that music tourism boosted the British economy by £2.2bn last year

Russell Brand is on his Messiah Complex tour

Comedy review: Russell Brand, Symphony Hall, Birmingham

The comedian is on his Messiah Complex world tour

Gig review: Gravenhurst, Bishopsgate Institute, London

Gravenhurst is the musical project of Nick Talbot - a Bristol-based singer-songwriter who coaxes gorgeous tones out of his guitars, but whose gentle tunes wrap up an often dark and melancholy lyrical heart. He's got the satisfying well-balanced melodies, the ever-so-pretty fingerpicking and the lush harmonising to rival many a modern folk act - Gravenhurst call to mind Kings of Convenience or early Iron and Wine, and have been compared to Simon and Garfunkel even - yet mysteriously Talbot's star has never risen so high.

It's not rock'n'roll for bands to blame the crowd

Arctic Monkeys and Plan B both turned on their fans. Bad move, says Elisa Bray

Sebastian Faulks: 'I've hated all this Scando-porn serial killer stuff'

Cultural life: Sebastian Faulks, novelist

'I've hated all this Scando-porn serial killer stuff'

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How to stop an asteroid hitting Earth: Would people co-operate to face down a global peril?

How to stop an asteroid hitting Earth

Would people cooperate to face a global peril?
Just one day to find €1.6bn: Greece edges nearer euro exit

One day to find €1.6bn

Greece is edging inexorably towards an exit from the euro
New 'Iron Man' augmented reality technology could help surgeons and firefighters, say scientists

'Iron Man' augmented reality technology could become reality

Holographic projections would provide extra information on objects in a person's visual field in real time
Sugary drinks 'are killing 184,000 adults around the world every year'

Sugary drinks are killing 184,000 adults around the world every year

The drinks that should be eliminated from people's diets
Pride of Place: Historians map out untold LGBT histories of locations throughout UK

Historians map out untold LGBT histories

Public are being asked to help improve the map
Lionel, Patti, Burt and The Who rock Glasto

Lionel, Patti, Burt and The Who rock Glasto

This was the year of 24-carat Golden Oldies
Paris Fashion Week

Paris Fashion Week

Thom Browne's scarecrows offer a rare beacon in commercial offerings
A year of the caliphate:

Isis, a year of the caliphate

Who can defeat the so-called 'Islamic State' – and how?
Marks and Spencer: Can a new team of designers put the spark back into the high-street brand?

Marks and Spencer

Can a new team of designers put the spark back into the high-street brand?
'We haven't invaded France': Italy's Prime Minister 'reclaims' Europe's highest peak

'We haven't invaded France'

Italy's Prime Minister 'reclaims' Europe's highest peak
Isis in Kobani: Why we ignore the worst of the massacres

Why do we ignore the worst of the massacres?

The West’s determination not to offend its Sunni allies helps Isis and puts us all at risk, says Patrick Cockburn
7/7 bombings 10 years on: Four emergency workers who saved lives recall the shocking day that 52 people were killed

Remembering 7/7 ten years on

Four emergency workers recall their memories of that day – and reveal how it's affected them ever since
Humans: Are the scientists developing robots in danger of replicating the hit Channel 4 drama?

They’re here to help

We want robots to do our drudge work, and to look enough like us for comfort. But are the scientists developing artificial intelligence in danger of replicating the TV drama Humans?
Time to lay these myths about the Deep South to rest

Time to lay these myths about the Deep South to rest

'Heritage' is a loaded word in the Dixie, but the Charleston killings show how dangerous it is to cling to a deadly past, says Rupert Cornwell
What exactly does 'one' mean? Court of Appeal passes judgement on thorny mathematical issue

What exactly does 'one' mean?

Court of Appeal passes judgement on thorny mathematical issue