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NuSTAR captures dead star and distant black holes

Obituary: Professor Hannes Alfvn

Hannes Olof Gsta Alfvn, theoretical physicist: born Norrkping Sweden 30 May 1908; Professor of Theory of Electricity, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm 1940-45, Professor of Electronics 1945-63, Professor of Plasma Physics 1963-73; Professor, University of California, San Diego (part- time) 1967-89; married 1935 Kerstin Erikson (five children); died Stockholm Sweden 2 April 1995.

CONTEMPORARY ART MARKET:Magnetic attraction that puts art on a pedestal

The Mona Hatoum sculpture showing at the White Cubegallery is a potential killer. A notice warns: "People fitted with pacemakers should not enter the installation space."

Blowin' in the supersonic wind

Storms on the Sun can create havoc here on Earth. A new project will in vestigate their causes. Peter Bond reports

Setback for families in battle over power cables

THE HIGH COURT ruled yesterday that the President of the Board of Trade, Michael Heseltine, did not have to adopt special precautions under European law to safeguard children from possible health risks from underground power cables.

Ulysses passes south pole of Sun

THE FASTEST scientific instrument in space yesterday passed the south pole of the Sun, a place where no human-made object has been before.

'Ulysses' plays billiards in space to see behind the Sun

A spacecraft named Ulysses will this week fulfil the Greek hero's task as described in Dante's Inferno: 'To venture the uncharted distances . . . of the uninhabited world behind the Sun.'

Cancer link with power cables dismissed

DOCTORS yesterday ruled out any link between childhood cancer and overhead electric power cables.

Innovation: French lesson in catching a wave

FRENCH knitting is providing an answer to the problem of electromagnatic radiation - produced when an electric current flows, writes Anna Kochan.

Pylons pose health risk dilemma for housing planners: Councils seek guidance on proposed developments near overhead cables as scientists study possible links with childhood cancers

PLANNERS are seeking urgent government action over requests for new housing developments near electricity power lines. They say they have been left in limbo, with no central government information on which to base planning decisions and no legal authority to refuse permission on health grounds.

Surfers can catch a magnetic wave

A DORSET company has lift-off - by selling the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (Nasa) a simulator that will give an earth-bound astronaut the sensation of floating in space.

Innovation: Gas scans could end lung X-rays

AN ADVANCE in medical imaging should allow diagnosis of lung tumours without the need for an X-ray scan.

Bringing the sun down to earth: Tom Wilkie reports on a pounds 200m project that will combine high technology with revival in the former East Germany

Tomorrow, senior civil servants from science ministries throughout the EU will consider a pounds 200m project to tame the energy source that drives the sun. In theory, the project could open the way to generating unlimited amounts of electricity using fuel derived from seawater.

VDUs get clean bill of health

PREGNANT women who work at computer terminals are not more likely to suffer miscarriages or have babies with congenital deformities, according to the most authoritative study yet published on the health risks of visual display units (VDUs).

Health: Spring can really hang you up: Research suggests a link between geomagnetic storms and depression. Jerome Burne reports

The idea that something out there in space can affect our health down here on Earth is one of the oldest in medicine. Influenza, for instance, literally means the 'influence' of certain baleful planetary forces; the word lunatic comes from the idea that the mad were particularly susceptible to the moon. However, for modern medicine, it is an approach that smacks too much of pseudo-science so is now largely dismissed.

BOOK REVIEW / Phantoms and termites: 'Seven Experiments That Could Change the World' - Rupert Sheldrake: Fourth Estate, 15.99

RUPERT SHELDRAKE is one of the would-be re-enchanters of the world. In a series of books since he launched his notorious theory of Formative Causation in A New Science of Life (1981) he has attacked Western science and urged us on to a new era in which hidden forces would liberate us.
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Isis hostage crisis: Militant group stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

Isis stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

The jihadis are being squeezed militarily and economically, but there is no sign of an implosion, says Patrick Cockburn
Virtual reality thrusts viewers into the frontline of global events - and puts film-goers at the heart of the action

Virtual reality: Seeing is believing

Virtual reality thrusts viewers into the frontline of global events - and puts film-goers at the heart of the action
Homeless Veterans appeal: MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’

Homeless Veterans appeal

MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’ to help
Larry David, Steve Coogan and other comedians share stories of depression in new documentary

Comedians share stories of depression

The director of the new documentary, Kevin Pollak, tells Jessica Barrett how he got them to talk
Has The Archers lost the plot with it's spicy storylines?

Has The Archers lost the plot?

A growing number of listeners are voicing their discontent over the rural soap's spicy storylines; so loudly that even the BBC's director-general seems worried, says Simon Kelner
English Heritage adds 14 post-war office buildings to its protected lists

14 office buildings added to protected lists

Christopher Beanland explores the underrated appeal of these palaces of pen-pushing
Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Scientists unearthed the cranial fragments from Manot Cave in West Galilee
World War Z author Max Brooks honours WW1's Harlem Hellfighters in new graphic novel

Max Brooks honours Harlem Hellfighters

The author talks about race, legacy and his Will Smith film option to Tim Walker
Why the league system no longer measures up

League system no longer measures up

Jon Coles, former head of standards at the Department of Education, used to be in charge of school performance rankings. He explains how he would reform the system
Valentine's Day cards: 5 best online card shops

Don't leave it to the petrol station: The best online card shops for Valentine's Day

Can't find a card you like on the high street? Try one of these sites for individual, personalised options, whatever your taste
Diego Costa: Devil in blue who upsets defences is a reminder of what Liverpool have lost

Devil in blue Costa is a reminder of what Liverpool have lost

The Reds are desperately missing Luis Suarez, says Ian Herbert
Ashley Giles: 'I'll watch England – but not as a fan'

Ashley Giles: 'I'll watch England – but not as a fan'

Former one-day coach says he will ‘observe’ their World Cup games – but ‘won’t be jumping up and down’
Greece elections: In times like these, the EU has far more dangerous adversaries than Syriza

Greece elections

In times like these, the EU has far more dangerous adversaries than Syriza, says Patrick Cockburn
Holocaust Memorial Day: Nazi victims remembered as spectre of prejudice reappears

Holocaust Memorial Day

Nazi victims remembered as spectre of prejudice reappears over Europe
Fortitude and the Arctic attraction: Our fascination with the last great wilderness

Magnetic north

The Arctic has always exerted a pull, from Greek myth to new thriller Fortitude. Gerard Gilbert considers what's behind our fascination with the last great wilderness