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NuSTAR captures dead star and distant black holes

Obituary: Professor Hannes Alfvn

Hannes Olof Gsta Alfvn, theoretical physicist: born Norrkping Sweden 30 May 1908; Professor of Theory of Electricity, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm 1940-45, Professor of Electronics 1945-63, Professor of Plasma Physics 1963-73; Professor, University of California, San Diego (part- time) 1967-89; married 1935 Kerstin Erikson (five children); died Stockholm Sweden 2 April 1995.

CONTEMPORARY ART MARKET:Magnetic attraction that puts art on a pedestal

The Mona Hatoum sculpture showing at the White Cubegallery is a potential killer. A notice warns: "People fitted with pacemakers should not enter the installation space."

Blowin' in the supersonic wind

Storms on the Sun can create havoc here on Earth. A new project will in vestigate their causes. Peter Bond reports

Setback for families in battle over power cables

THE HIGH COURT ruled yesterday that the President of the Board of Trade, Michael Heseltine, did not have to adopt special precautions under European law to safeguard children from possible health risks from underground power cables.

Ulysses passes south pole of Sun

THE FASTEST scientific instrument in space yesterday passed the south pole of the Sun, a place where no human-made object has been before.

'Ulysses' plays billiards in space to see behind the Sun

A spacecraft named Ulysses will this week fulfil the Greek hero's task as described in Dante's Inferno: 'To venture the uncharted distances . . . of the uninhabited world behind the Sun.'

Cancer link with power cables dismissed

DOCTORS yesterday ruled out any link between childhood cancer and overhead electric power cables.

Innovation: French lesson in catching a wave

FRENCH knitting is providing an answer to the problem of electromagnatic radiation - produced when an electric current flows, writes Anna Kochan.

Pylons pose health risk dilemma for housing planners: Councils seek guidance on proposed developments near overhead cables as scientists study possible links with childhood cancers

PLANNERS are seeking urgent government action over requests for new housing developments near electricity power lines. They say they have been left in limbo, with no central government information on which to base planning decisions and no legal authority to refuse permission on health grounds.

Surfers can catch a magnetic wave

A DORSET company has lift-off - by selling the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (Nasa) a simulator that will give an earth-bound astronaut the sensation of floating in space.

Innovation: Gas scans could end lung X-rays

AN ADVANCE in medical imaging should allow diagnosis of lung tumours without the need for an X-ray scan.

Bringing the sun down to earth: Tom Wilkie reports on a pounds 200m project that will combine high technology with revival in the former East Germany

Tomorrow, senior civil servants from science ministries throughout the EU will consider a pounds 200m project to tame the energy source that drives the sun. In theory, the project could open the way to generating unlimited amounts of electricity using fuel derived from seawater.

VDUs get clean bill of health

PREGNANT women who work at computer terminals are not more likely to suffer miscarriages or have babies with congenital deformities, according to the most authoritative study yet published on the health risks of visual display units (VDUs).

Health: Spring can really hang you up: Research suggests a link between geomagnetic storms and depression. Jerome Burne reports

The idea that something out there in space can affect our health down here on Earth is one of the oldest in medicine. Influenza, for instance, literally means the 'influence' of certain baleful planetary forces; the word lunatic comes from the idea that the mad were particularly susceptible to the moon. However, for modern medicine, it is an approach that smacks too much of pseudo-science so is now largely dismissed.

BOOK REVIEW / Phantoms and termites: 'Seven Experiments That Could Change the World' - Rupert Sheldrake: Fourth Estate, 15.99

RUPERT SHELDRAKE is one of the would-be re-enchanters of the world. In a series of books since he launched his notorious theory of Formative Causation in A New Science of Life (1981) he has attacked Western science and urged us on to a new era in which hidden forces would liberate us.
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Swimsuit, £245, by Agent Provocateur
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peopleFirst Gollum, then King Kong - now the actor is swinging through trees in Dawn of the Planet of the Apes
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Blackman: Landscape of children’s literature does not reflect the cultural diversity of young people
booksMalorie Blackman appeals for a better ethnic mix of authors and characters and the illustrator Quentin Blake comes to the rescue
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food + drinkSilo in Brighton will have just six staple dishes on the menu every day, including one meat option, one fish, one vegan, and one 'wild card'
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Iraq crisis: How Saudi Arabia helped Isis take over the north of the country

How Saudi Arabia helped Isis take over northern Iraq

A speech by an ex-MI6 boss hints at a plan going back over a decade. In some areas, being Shia is akin to being a Jew in Nazi Germany, says Patrick Cockburn
The evolution of Andy Serkis: First Gollum, then King Kong - now the actor is swinging through the trees in Dawn of the Planet of the Apes

The evolution of Andy Serkis

First Gollum, then King Kong - now the actor is swinging through the trees in Dawn of the Planet of the Apes
You thought 'Benefits Street' was controversial: Follow-up documentary 'Immigrant Street' has got locals worried

You thought 'Benefits Street' was controversial...

Follow-up documentary 'Immigrant Street' has got locals worried
Refugee children from Central America let down by Washington's high ideals

Refugee children let down by Washington's high ideals

Democrats and Republicans refuse to set aside their differences to cope with the influx of desperate Central Americas, says Rupert Cornwell
Children's books are too white, says Laureate

Children's books are too white, says Laureate

Malorie Blackman appeals for a better ethnic mix of authors and characters and the illustrator Quentin Blake comes to the rescue
Blackest is the new black: Scientists have developed a material so dark that you can't see it...

Blackest is the new black

Scientists have developed a material so dark that you can't see it...
Matthew Barzun: America's diplomatic dude

Matthew Barzun: America's diplomatic dude

The US Ambassador to London holds 'jeans and beer' gigs at his official residence – it's all part of the job, he tells Chris Green
Meet the Quantified Selfers: From heart rates to happiness, there is little this fast-growing, self-tracking community won't monitor

Meet the 'Quantified Selfers'

From heart rates to happiness, there is little this fast-growing, self-tracking community won't monitor
Madani Younis: Five-star reviews are just the opening act for British theatre's first non-white artistic director

Five-star reviews are just the opening act for British theatre's first non-white artistic director

Madani Younis wants the neighbourhood to follow his work as closely as his audiences do
Mrs Brown and her boys: are they having a laugh?

Mrs Brown and her boys: are they having a laugh?

When it comes to national stereotyping, the Irish – among others – know it can pay to play up to outsiders' expectations, says DJ Taylor
Gavin Maxwell's bitter legacy: Was the otter man the wildlife champion he appeared to be?

Otter man Gavin Maxwell's bitter legacy

The aristocrat's eccentric devotion to his pets inspired a generation. But our greatest living nature writer believes his legacy has been quite toxic
Joanna Rowsell: The World Champion cyclist on breaking her collarbone, shattering her teeth - and dealing with alopecia

Joanna Rowsell: 'I wear my wig to look normal'

The World Champion cyclist on breaking her collarbone, shattering her teeth - and dealing with alopecia
Bill Granger recipes: Our chef gives raw ingredients a lift with his quick marinades

Bill Granger's quick and delicious marinades

Our chef's marinades are great for weekend barbecuing, but are also a delicious way of injecting flavour into, and breaking the monotony of, weekday meals
Germany vs Argentina World Cup 2014 preview: Why Brazilians don't love their neighbours Argentina any more

Anyone but Argentina – why Brazilians don’t love their neighbours any more

The hosts will be supporting Germany in today's World Cup final, reports Alex Bellos
The Open 2014: Time again to ask that major question - can Lee Westwood win at last?

The Open 2014

Time again to ask that major question - can Lee Westwood win at last?