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NuSTAR captures dead star and distant black holes

Building a better life in the shadow of death

Can you fight cancer and the medical establishment at the same time? By Jeremy Laurance

Letter: Charging about

Sir: Why is it that we do not build our houses with a 6-volt supply in addition to the standard 240?

Spotting a climate change

The role sunspots may play in determining our weather has long been a source of debate. A discovery this week may shed light on the matter

Stars and Planets: July

Midsummer's Day has focused attention on our local star - and whether you're a druid or a Wimbledon fan, you can't ignore it. But how well do we understand the Sun? Its brilliant but bland surface has long hidden its secrets. In the past couple of years, astronomers have begun to understand what makes the Sun tick - and explode - thanks to the ever- vigilant satellite SOHO, the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory. This joint mission of ESA and NASA was launched in 1995.

Bolt from the blue solves mystery of missing hikers

THE ANNUAL mystery of solo hikers found dead in the mountains with no apparent cause may have a solution. Doctors suggest that these deaths may be the result of near-miss lightning strikes generating a huge magnetic pulse.

Sun's burning question answered

IT'S A question with which you could, for more than 50 years, shut up any physicist who was bothering you at a party. Why, exactly, is the sun's atmosphere hotter than its surface?

Science: It's not getting there

After years of attempting to make the floating `maglev' train a reality, the dream has proved too expensive. So why are Japan and Germany still trying?

Weather: Spotting a change in climate

The debate over the effect of sunspots on the earth's weather has been running for more than a century. Yet the issue is still clouded in mystery.

Science: Hubble reveals spectacle of Jupiter's `Northern Lights'

The "Northern Lights" seen on Earth have their equivalents on all the other planets. Jupiter, the biggest, doesn't skimp when it comes to a show, as the latest pictures from the Hubble Space Telescope reveal. Charles Arthur, Science Editor, explains.

Space: Flowing carpets keep Sun warm

A 55-year-old mystery about the temperature of the Sun's corona - the outermost layer, visible during a solar eclipse - has been solved by a European Space Agency (ESA) spacecraft. The answer, it turns out, is that the Sun is covered in carpets.

Health: Voyage to the centre of the mind

Breakthroughs in brain scanning reveal more fully how much the mechanics of physiology rule our minds. Such knowledge makes us fear for our souls. Jerome Burne wonders if it should.

Obituary: Alwyn Rushworth

Francis Alwyn Rushworth, physicist: born Cleckheaton, West Yorkshire 2 July 1920; Assistant Lecturer in Physics, St Andrews University 1947- 49, Lecturer 1949-61, Senior Lecturer 1961-71, Reader 1971-82; FRSE 1961; married 1947 Gwen Johnson (three sons, one daughter); died near St Andrews, Fife 19 August 1997.

Science: Bones and muscles, ploughs and phones

Technoquest

Obituary: Anthony Clark

Anthony Clark contributed much to archaeological science, but will be remembered particularly as a pioneer in the use of geophysical prospecting methods which are now indispensable to much practical field archaeology.

Clocking the swirls of summertime

Lucy Pringle, a stylish fiftysomething, has been researching crop circles for the past 10 years. In spite of a meagre budget, she travels constantly from her home in Hampshire to inspect new formations, and, whenever she can afford it, she hires a light aircraft for aerial photography. She has lectured widely in this country, as well as the United States and Canada, and her book, The Sky is Not the Limit, about "crop formations and other associated mysteries", is to be published next year.
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Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
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Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
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The long walk west: they fled war in Syria, only to get held up in Hungary – now hundreds of refugees have set off on foot for Austria

They fled war in Syria...

...only to get stuck and sidetracked in Hungary
From The Prisoner to Mad Men, elaborate title sequences are one of the keys to a great TV series

Title sequences: From The Prisoner to Mad Men

Elaborate title sequences are one of the keys to a great TV series. But why does the art form have such a chequered history?
Giorgio Armani Beauty's fabric-inspired foundations: Get back to basics this autumn

Giorgio Armani Beauty's foundations

Sumptuous fabrics meet luscious cosmetics for this elegant look
From stowaways to Operation Stack: Life in a transcontinental lorry cab

Life from the inside of a trucker's cab

From stowaways to Operation Stack, it's a challenging time to be a trucker heading to and from the Continent
Kelis interview: The songwriter and sauce-maker on cooking for Pharrell and crying over potatoes

Kelis interview

The singer and sauce-maker on cooking for Pharrell
Refugee crisis: David Cameron lowered the flag for the dead king of Saudi Arabia - will he do the same honour for little Aylan Kurdi?

Cameron lowered the flag for the dead king of Saudi Arabia...

But will he do the same honour for little Aylan Kurdi, asks Robert Fisk
Our leaders lack courage in this refugee crisis. We are shamed by our European neighbours

Our leaders lack courage in this refugee crisis. We are shamed by our European neighbours

Humanity must be at the heart of politics, says Jeremy Corbyn
Joe Biden's 'tease tour': Could the US Vice-President be testing the water for a presidential run?

Joe Biden's 'tease tour'

Could the US Vice-President be testing the water for a presidential run?
Britain's 24-hour culture: With the 'leisured society' a distant dream we're working longer and less regular hours than ever

Britain's 24-hour culture

With the 'leisured society' a distant dream we're working longer and less regular hours than ever
Diplomacy board game: Treachery is the way to win - which makes it just like the real thing

The addictive nature of Diplomacy

Bullying, betrayal, aggression – it may be just a board game, but the family that plays Diplomacy may never look at each other in the same way again
Lady Chatterley's Lover: Racy underwear for fans of DH Lawrence's equally racy tome

Fashion: Ooh, Lady Chatterley!

Take inspiration from DH Lawrence's racy tome with equally racy underwear
8 best children's clocks

Tick-tock: 8 best children's clocks

Whether you’re teaching them to tell the time or putting the finishing touches to a nursery, there’s a ticker for that
Charlie Austin: Queens Park Rangers striker says ‘If the move is not right, I’m not going’

Charlie Austin: ‘If the move is not right, I’m not going’

After hitting 18 goals in the Premier League last season, the QPR striker was the great non-deal of transfer deadline day. But he says he'd preferred another shot at promotion
Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

How Isis profits from destruction of antiquities

Robert Fisk on the terrorist group's manipulation of the market to increase the price of artefacts
Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

In an exclusive interview, Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea