News The 'death mask' was almost certainly taken by Francis Burton, a British surgeon in attendance at Napoleon's death

The plaster mask was sold for £175,000 to an overseas buyer earlier this year by a descendant of the brother of its original owner

Virtually Viking

E X T R A C U R R I C U L U M

OBITUARIES Marguerite Kelsey

Marguerite Kelsey was a celebrated artists' model and one of the last of her kind.

Royal parks `sliding into shabbiness and decay'

Nicholas Schoon reviews a plan for Greenwich to be turned into `a new Versailles'

Obituary: Helen Wallis

Helen Wallis was one of Britain's leading historians of cartography.

London looks to big-spending millennium

Survey details 160 projects to mark arrival of 21st century but says su burbs lack enthusiasm

Obituaries : John Miller

John Bryan Peter Duppa-Miller, naval officer and educational administrator: born Stetchford 22 May 1903; GC and King's commendation 1941; Inspector- General, Ministry of Education, Addis Ababa 1945-47, Education Department, Kenya 1947-57; Secretary to Kenya Coffee Marketing Board 1960-61; Secretary to Tanganyika Coffee Board 1961-62; Assistant Secretary and Marketing Officer, Ministry of Lands and Settlement, Kenya 1963-65; author of Saints and Parachutes 1951; married 1926 Barbara Buckmaster (three sons; marriage dissolved), 1944 Clare Harding (deceased), 1977 Greta Landby; died 15 December 1994.

LETTER: Gazing at the naval picture gallery

From Mr Pieter van der Merwe Sir: The idea that the Royal Naval College at Greenwich be used as an art gallery is hardly new (letter, 22 December).

Mean time

THE idea of a day out in Greenwich to visit the new Titanic exhibition seemed like a good idea last Sunday morning. But the engineering works that multiply the 15-minute journey time from central London four-fold were just a foretaste of the problems ahead.

Greenwich plans big party for millennium: Matthew Brace travels to south-east London to find the significant reality of an imaginary line

London's tourist board is backing Greenwich's proposal to hold 'the best end-of-millennium party in the universe' to celebrate the dawn of 2000.

Centrefold: What goes around ..

The sinking of the Estonia last week again captured the haunting reality of a disaster at sea. It is one of the reasons that the Titanic has such a hold on our imaginations. Tomorrow, that story resurfaces in a new exhibition at the National Maritime Museum in Greenwich.

Titanic's alarms bells that warned of disaster go on show

A CHILLING reminder of the watertight doors that could not save the supposedly unsinkable Titanic has been brought from the ocean bed to be the centrepiece of the first major exhibition of objects recovered from the wreck, which will open in London in 10 days' time.

2.6 million bid for station

Campaigners lobbying for a Docklands Light Railway station to open at a riverside tourist area have pledged extra cash towards the project.

Cutty Sark station on the agenda

Pressure is mounting for the construction of a railway station to serve one of London's most high-profile tourist areas which includes attractions such as the Cutty Sark and the National Maritime Museum.

Craftsmen give the National Maritime Museum a facelift

A craftsman finishing moulding on the roof of the National Maritime Museum in Greenwich during restoration work that includes the cleaning and replacing of the stonework facade. The west wing of the museum is being refurbished and work on the historic listed site will continue over the next year.

Boats that don't float are making waves: In the market for model yachts it is the static museum-pieces which fetch the really high prices, reports John Windsor

Elaborate 'dockyard' models, assumed for three centuries to have been copied by shipwrights making full-size ships, are now thought to have been made to satisfy the vanity of grown-up boys with a passion for grown-up toys. Simon Stephens, curator of ship models at the National Maritime Museum in Greenwich, has gathered evidence that even 'Navy Board' models, made in the 100 years from 1650, were often commissioned by individuals - admirals, captains, high-ranking civil servants - as collectables or presentation pieces.
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