News The 'death mask' was almost certainly taken by Francis Burton, a British surgeon in attendance at Napoleon's death

The plaster mask was sold for £175,000 to an overseas buyer earlier this year by a descendant of the brother of its original owner

DIARY: Museum seeks to raise the roof

LONDON's skyline could have a new addition by the turn of the century, a huge dome-like structure above the National Maritime Museum, following approval by Greenwich council of a pounds 9m plan. A partially glazed elliptical roof raised on four steel columns will cover a courtyard exhibiting royal barges, ships' engines and a paddle steamer. Students of architecture are expected to be delighted.

Diary: Labour moves into the black

The Labour Party has long been able to score political points over the Conservatives on the subject of apartheid, but with the South African elections in sight, its rivals are gaining the upper hand. Following a meeting of the Parliamentary Labour Party on Wednesday night, Conservative MPs were surprised to learn that all eight Labour representatives selected to go on the 20- strong Westminster delegation to oversee next month's historic vote are white.

'Titanic' show goes on despite grave-robbing row: Maritime museum says it is satisfied none of the artefacts have been taken from the wreck. Rhys Williams reports

AMID concerns about 'grave robbing', an exhibition of artefacts recovered from the seabed around the wreck of the Titanic will be staged at the National Maritime Museum in Greenwich this autumn, before embarking on a world tour.

Travel: Departures: Moving ahead

THE MUSEUM of the Moving Image (MOMI) on London's South Bank is the city's best-liked tourist attraction, according to a new visitor survey. When votes for 'best attraction' were calculated as proportion of numbers visiting 26 London venues, MOMI was placed top with 44 per cent, followed by the Tower of London (41 per cent), Madame Tussaud's (35 per cent), Natural History Museum (34 per cent), National Gallery (30 per cent), National Maritime Museum (29 per cent), Science Museum (28 per cent), Hampton Court (28 per cent), Rock Circus (26 per cent) and the London Dungeon (26 per cent).

Art Market: Telephone bid secures 'Jerusalem' for 617,500 pounds

The last complete copy in private hands of William Blake's prophetic book, Jerusalem, was sold at Christie's yesterday for pounds 617,500. Bearing in mind that many regard it as Blake's greatest work, Christie's had prophesied that it would sell for between pounds 600,000 and pounds 1m. It went to an anonymous telephone bidder, writes Dalya Alberge.

Travel: A mean time in Greenwich

'EXCUSE me, sir. Is this where we stand in line for the Green Witch boat?' asked the American tourist laden with the regulation 2.4 cameras. For a moment I thought he might have been talking about a pub, then realisation dawned: 'Oh, you mean Greenwich.'

Tripping the light fantastic: On Saturday, a shaft of light will pierce the night sky over London, illuminating the Meridian Line from its starting-point at the Old Royal Observatory. Dalya Alberge reports on the latest addition to the skyline

Peter Fink would rather his name wasn't mentioned. Happy enough to talk about his art, he is uneasy at the hyping of artists - 'who are becoming actors rather than creators'. He believes artists should be more like architects, whose buildings are often better known than the individuals who built them. 'Artists have become 'culture-icons',' he adds, 'propelled by the art market into producing 'significant' works with a recognisable style, that can be repeated and bought, before they develop fully.'

He had the whole world in his clock hands

THIS YEAR is the tercentenary of the birth of one of my heroes, a man whose work I do not understand in any technical sense although its beauty, precision and usefulness have delighted me for 20 years. His name is John Harrison.

150-year mystery of lost expedition may be solved: A chance find by a man on holiday may explain an Arctic disaster, reports James Buchan

In Baffin's Bay where the whale-fishes blow, / The fate of Franklin no man may know

Recovery plan for Bronze Age ship under A20

ARCHAEOLOGISTS are to launch a rescue bid to recover further sections of a 3,000-year-old ship found in Dover last month.

Roadworks unearth Bronze Age ship

A SHIP 3,000 years old has been discovered by archaeologists in the centre of Dover.

Museum charts glory days of power at sea

THE NATIONAL Maritime Museum in Greenwich, south-east London, yesterday opened its latest permanent exhibition.

Summer reading: Books for Children: Non-Fiction

Nature Detective: Plants by Anita Ganeri & Adrian Lascom, Franklin Watts pounds 7.99. Introduction to botany which blends basic facts - how plants grow, what flowers are for - with well-I-never snippets: the flower that imprisons midges to make them unload their pollen cargo; the plant that grows five kilos of roots per day. Superb pictures, lots of things to make - bark rubbings, mushroom spore prints, bottle gardens.
Arts & Entertainment
Ricky Gervais at a screening of 'Muppets Most Wanted' in London last month
tvRicky Gervais on the return of 'Derek' – and why he still ignores his critics
Sport
Gareth Bale dribbled from inside his own half and finished calmly late in the final to hand Real a 2-1 win at the Mestalla in Valencia
sport
Life & Style
Infant child breast-feeding with eyes closed
healthTo stop mummy having any more babies, according to scientists
Arts & Entertainment
James Franco and Chris O'Dowd in Of Mice and Men on Broadway
theatreReview: Of Mice and Men, Longacre Theatre
News
news
Life & Style
Going down: Google's ambition to build an elevator into space isn't likely to be fulfilled any time soon
techTechnology giant’s scientists say there is no material strong enough for a cable from Earth into orbit
Arts & Entertainment
film
Sport
Vito Mannone fails to keep out Samir Nasri's late strike
sportMan City 2 Sunderland 2: Goalkeeping howler allows Man City to scrap a draw – but Premier League title is Liverpool's to lose
News
David Cameron sings a hymn during the enthronement service of The Most Rev Justin Welby as Archbishop of Canterbury, at Canterbury Cathedral last year
news
Life & Style
From long to Jong: Guy Pewsey gets the North Korean leader's look
fashionThe Independent heads to an Ealing hairdressers to try out the North Korean dictator's trademark do
Career Services

Day In a Page

Independent Travel Shop See all offers »
Classical Spain
Classical Spain
Six nights from £569pp Find out more
Pompeii
Pompeii, Capri and the Bay of Naples
Seven nights from £799pp Find out more
Spring Breaks
Spring breaks with dinner
Two nights from £64.50pp Find out more
London Theatre and Hotel breaks
London theatre and hotel breaks
One night and ticket from £84pp Find out more
Ricky Gervais: 'People are waiting for me to fail. If you think it's awful, then just don't watch it'

Ricky Gervais: 'People are waiting for me to fail'

As the second series of his divisive sitcom 'Derek' hits screens, the comedian tells James Rampton why he'll never bow to the critics who habitually circle his work
Mad Men series 7, TV review: The suits are still sharp, but Don Draper has lost his edge

Mad Men returns for a final fling

The suits are still sharp, but Don Draper has lost his edge
Google finds a lift into space will never get off the ground as there is no material strong enough for a cable from Earth into orbit

Google finds a lift into space will never get off the ground

Technology giant’s scientists say there is no material strong enough for a cable from Earth into orbit
Westminster is awash with tales of young men being sexually harassed - but it's far from being just a problem in politics

Is sexual harassment a fact of gay life?

Westminster is awash with tales of young men being sexually harassed - but it's far from being just a problem in politics
Moshi Monster creator Michael Acton Smith: The man behind a British success story

Moshi Monster creator Michael Acton Smith

Acton Smith launched a world of virtual creatures who took the real world by storm
Kim Jong-un's haircut: The Independent heads to Ealing to try out the dictator's do

Our journalist tries out Kim Jong-un's haircut

The North Korean embassy in London complained when M&M Hair Academy used Kim Jong-un's image in the window. Curious, Guy Pewsey heads to the hair salon and surrenders to the clippers
A History of the First World War in 100 moments: A forgotten naval victory in which even Nature played a part

A History of the First World War in 100 moments

A forgotten naval victory in which even Nature played a part
Vespa rides on with launch of Primavera: Iconic Italian scooter still revving up millions of sales

Vespa rides on with launch of the Primavera

The Vespa has been a style icon since the 1950s and the release this month of its latest model confirms it has lost little of its lustre
Record Store Day: Independent music shops can offer a tempting alternative to downloads

Record Store Day celebrates independent music shops

This Saturday sees a host of events around the country to champion the sellers of well-grooved wax
Taunton's policy of putting philosophy at heart of its curriculum is one of secrets of its success

Education: Secret of Taunton's success

Taunton School, in Somerset, is one of the country's leading independent schools, says Richard Garner
10 best smartphones

10 best smartphones

With a number of new smartphones on the market, we round up the best around, including some more established models
Mickey Arthur: Aussie tells ECB to stick with Ashley Giles

Mickey Arthur: Aussie tells ECB to stick with Ashley Giles

The former Australia coach on why England must keep to Plan A, about his shock at their collapse Down Under, why he sent players home from India and the agonies of losing his job
Homelessness: Why is the supported lodgings lifeline under threat?

Why is the supported lodgings lifeline under threat?

Zubairi Sentongo swapped poverty in Uganda for homelessness in Britain. But a YMCA scheme connected him with a couple offering warmth and shelter
A History of the First World War in 100 Moments: When the world’s biggest shed took over Regent’s Park

A History of the First World War in 100 Moments

When the world’s biggest shed took over Regent’s Park
The pain of IVF

The pain of IVF

As an Italian woman vows to keep the babies from someone else’s eggs, Julian Baggini ponders how the reality of childbirth is often messier than the natural ideal