News Former correspondent of the News of the World and Sunday Mirror Dan Evans arrives at the Old Bailey

“Shock” and “anxiety” ran through the editorial floor of the News of the World the day two people were arrested in 2006 in connection with phone hacking. The description, from the former News International staff journalist Dan Evans, was told to the jury at the phone hacking trial.

Boris Johnson and Rupert Murdoch have had at least two private meetings in the last six months

Boris has met Rupert Murdoch in private twice in six months

Boris Johnson and Rupert Murdoch have had at least two private meetings in the last six months, it was claimed today. They dined privately at the media mogul’s home in Mayfair this week, with Damian Lewis, star of the spy drama Homeland.

Virginia Wheeler was arrested last March

The Sun's defence editor Virginia Wheeler and former Met PC Paul Flattley charged with misconduct in public office

Alison Levitt said the charges related to the payment of money for information about the death of a 14-year-old girl as well as other 'accidents, incidents and crimes'

How 'The Sun' jumped the gun on Harry – and vindicated his view of newspapers

"We heard this posh voice come over the radio and knew it was Big H"

If only Lance Armstrong had given Alastair Campbell warning about his drug-taking past

Our diarist notes that Tony Blair's former spin doctor was a particularly devoted worshipper of the disgraced former Tour de France winner. Funny, that

Has Rupert Murdoch turned into a climate change sceptic?

(And, if so, his late mother wouldn’t be very pleased)

Scotland Yard officer made 'extremely stupid' decision to give News of the World information about new phone hacking inquiry

A senior officer at Scotland Yard made an “extremely stupid” decision to give the News of the World information about a new police inquiry into phone hacking, her lawyer admitted today.

Yard anti-terror chief 'rang paper to ask for a bribe'

A senior Scotland Yard counter-terrorism officer rang the News of the World (NOTW) to offer "highly sensitive" inside information about a police inquiry into phone hacking at the newspaper in exchange for a bribe, a court heard yesterday.

Osamu Suzuki, left, is the fourth adopted son to run the family company

No heir to run the company? Why adult ‘adoption’ is big business in Japan

Family firms in Japan often rely on adult adoptees to help retain dynastic control. Finding a match has become an industry in itself

Richard Sumner, left, and Julian Barnsfield at court yesterday

David Cameron's local hunt fined £26,300 for illegal fox hunting

David Cameron’s favourite fox hunt, and David Cameron's favourite huntsman, were both fined for illegal hunting today in a case which will embarrass the Prime Minister.

Model Elle Macpherson will answer key questions on phone hacking

Elle Macpherson to be quizzed on why she believes her former manager was the source of News of the World leaks

The Australian supermodel Elle Macpherson is to be formally asked 11 key questions on phone hacking and what led her to conclude that her former manager, Mary Ellen Field, was the source of leaks published in the News of the World that revealed private details about her personal life.

Rebekah Brooks, former editor of The Sun and the News of the World

Rebekah Brooks paid £10.8 million compensation after she resigned from News International

But former editor of The Sun and the News of the World would be forced to repay millions if she is convicted of criminal charges relating to her time at the company

Max Clifford denies breaching former royal butler Paul Burrell's confidentiality by passing personal details to News of the World

Max Clifford, the king of Fleet Street’s kiss-and-tell market, has denied claims by the former royal butler Paul Burrell that he breached his confidentiality by passing personal details about him to the News of the World.

Ian Burrell: Will reshuffle see more London hacks in NY?

Tom Mockridge's valedictory email to colleagues yesterday made clear his disappointment in a master he had served so well.

Saddam Hussein was splashed across The Sun and the New York Post in 2005

The Sun made illegal payment to US serviceman to obtain Saddam picture, says MP

Rupert Murdoch faces calls to hand police all his personal emails to senior News International executives amid claims his media empire paid a serving member of the US forces for a photo of Saddam Hussein.

The press: To legislate or not to legislate?

Any statutory regulation would ignore a fundamental problem with our prurient society
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Easter 2015: 14 best decorations

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Britain's mild winters could be numbered: why global warming is leaving UK chillier

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The most borrowed book at Bank of England library? Oh dear

The book's fifth edition is used for Edexcel exams
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Child abuse scandal: Did a botched blackmail attempt by South African intelligence help Cyril Smith escape justice?

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