News Former correspondent of the News of the World and Sunday Mirror Dan Evans arrives at the Old Bailey

“Shock” and “anxiety” ran through the editorial floor of the News of the World the day two people were arrested in 2006 in connection with phone hacking. The description, from the former News International staff journalist Dan Evans, was told to the jury at the phone hacking trial.

David Cameron, Prime Minister: Mr Cameron was one of the last witnesses to the Leveson Inquiry and the judge went out of his way to accept one of his key assertions – that politicians had “got too close to the media”. Leveson said: “The problem is public perception... A way of conducting relationships with the media which leads to a situation in which a public inquiry is needed to take an objective, not to say forensic, look at the matter in order to reassure the public cannot be considered as satisfactory.”

Cameron and Hunt let off lightly with conflict of interest warning

Former Culture Secretary criticised for relationship ‘too close with press’ over role in failed BSkyB deal

John Yates: Assistant Commissioner*
“The error of judgement in deciding on immediate and prompt dismissal of the allegations by press announcement that afternoon [in July 2009] should have been apparent at the time.”
*All have retired or resigned

Blunders not corruption led to bungled police response

Report finds no reason to question Met’s integrity, but casts doubt on competence

Rebekah Brooks was charged with bribery at Westminster magistrates' court yesterday

It's not all bad news: listening to Leveson yesterday, I realised this is an opportunity for the press

Our industry is beset by chronic structural problems, but it is worth taking away some positives from what has been a long, hard and useful bout of introspection

Andy Coulson and Rebekah Brooks

Andy Coulson and Rebekah Brooks in court over charges linked to alleged corrupt payments to public officials

David Cameron's former spin doctor Andy Coulson and ex-News International chief executive Rebekah Brooks appeared in court today to face charges linked to alleged corrupt payments to public officials.

Lord Justice Leveson's report on phone hacking will be published in November, with possible controls on the press

Public doesn't care a jot – or a tittle – about Leveson

Sitting in a newspaper office, it's easy to believe that the Leveson Report is a highly significant moment. But few outside them seem to care

Police charge Brooks and Coulson with bribery

A senior civil servant at the Ministry of Defence was on the payroll of The Sun for almost a decade, prosecutors claimed yesterday as they charged the former editor of Britain's best-selling newspaper, Rebekah Brooks, and its chief reporter with plotting to bribe public officials.

Andy Coulson alleged to have conspired to bribe public officials to secure phone numbers of the Royal Family

David Cameron’s former communications director, Andy Coulson, conspired to bribe public officials to secure the phone numbers of the Royal Family, according to the charges against him announced today.

Andy Coulson (left) and Rebekah Brooks

MoD civil servant pocketed '£100k from The Sun': Rebekah Brooks and Andy Coulson charged with plotting to bribe public officials

A senior civil servant at the Ministry of Defence was on the payroll of the Sun for almost a decade, prosecutors claimed as they charged the former editor of Britain’s best-selling newspaper, Rebekah Brooks, and its chief reporter with plotting to bribe public officials.

Conservative MP Nadine Dorries wants to amend the health Bill to stop
charities who offer abortions giving advice to women seeking terminations

A new low in parliamentary history? Serving Conservative MP Nadine Dorries takes time out to appear reality television show I'm a Celebrity...

Nadine Dorries has set what many will see as a new low in parliamentary history by being the first serving MP from a major political party to take time out to appear on a ‘reality TV’ show.

Leveson Inquiry DID ask David Cameron to provide evidence of News International communications on 'a range of issues'

Pressure grows on Cameron to publish communications with Rebekah Brooks

Msg to RB: “The horse CB [Charlie Brooks] put me on. Fast, unpredictable and hard to control but fun.” Msg to DC: “Brilliant speech. I cried twice. Will love ‘working together’”

David Cameron under new pressure to release Rebekah Brooks texts after leak

David Cameron will come under fresh pressure this week to reveal the content of "salacious" messages between him and Rebekah Brooks.

Editorial: Only total transparency will do, Prime Minister

If there is one thing the Prime Minister should learn from the latest revelations about his text message exchanges with Rebekah Brooks, it is that suspicions about their unpublished communications are not going to go away. However harmless, however innocent the content, the drip-drip of such missives into the public domain will be interpreted as evidence that there is more, and that somewhere there lurks damaging information that is being deliberately concealed.

Rupert Murdoch, the Establishment and why I can't wait to see Conrad Black on Have I Got News for You

On outsiders pretending to be insiders and insiders pretending to be outsiders

The Prime Minister avoided questions over private emails between him and the former News International chief executive, Rebekah Brooks

'It stinks of a cover-up': David Cameron sidesteps email cache questions

Cameron refuses to give further details on Brooks correspondence in reply to Labour deputy leader

The Prime Minister lost his cool in the Commons

Angry Cameron breaks protocol in refusing to tell MPs about emails to Rebekah Brooks

David Cameron is under pressure to release private emails exchanged with Rebekah Brooks that he has withheld from the Leveson Inquiry, after extraordinary scenes in the House of Commons in which he refused to answer a question on the issue.

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In this photo illustration a school student eats a hamburger as part of his lunch which was brought from a fast food shop near his school, on October 5, 2005 in London, England. The British government has announced plans to remove junk food from school lunches. From September 2006, food that is high in fat, sugar or salt will be banned from meals and removed from vending machines in schools across England. The move comes in response to a campaign by celebrity TV chef Jamie Oliver to improve school meals.
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