Arts and Entertainment Jake Bugg's musical transition to America has not adversely affected his work

If the challenge faced by Jake Bugg on his second album is to prove you can take the boy out of Clifton (the Nottingham council estate where he was born) without taking all traces of Clifton out of the boy, then it’s one he rises to. Those who see Bugg’s so-called “authenticity” — whatever that means — as a storm of hype might spy signs of “grooming” in the decision to record in LA with producer Rick Rubin, but the follow-up to his hit debut makes the Midlands-to-Malibu move look largely seamless: as an exercise in expanded range, Shangri La is too diverse and distinct to dismiss.

Album: Jack White, Blunderbuss (XL Recordings)

You don’t, one would assume, pull theplug on one of the most successful rock acts of the 21st century without good reason. Jack White’s side projects and post-White Stripes collaborations have, so far, been variable in quality. He must therefore, surely, have been holding back the real fireworks for the first album under his own name?

Cast, Shepherds Bush Empire, London

When a band reforms after a long hiatus, their comeback album can be seen as an afterthought amid the ensuing cash-in, so credit is due to Cast. After a 10-year break, the Scouse four-piece choose to perform three-quarters of their latest release rather than rely on back-catalogue safety.

Jim Marshall launched his amplifier in 1965 and saw it conquer the world

Farewell to the 'Father of Loud' – it's been a blast

The rock world has promised to "crank it up to 11" to mark the death of Jim Marshall, the "Father of Loud", whose groundbreaking amplifiers gave the gift of extreme volume to generations of guitar heroes.

Festival Guide 2012: Ones to watch

"Oh yeah, all right/ Take it easy, baby/ make it last all night."

Noel Gallagher's High Flying Birds, Motorpoint Arena, Sheffield
Ladyhawke, Rough Trade East, London

The best thing about Noel Gallagher is that he isn't Liam. Sadly,it's also the worst thing about the former Oasis songwriter

Critic's View: The Brit Awards, O2 Arena, London

It was crying out for Cocker, Ross... even Gervais

Brit Awards nominees in pictures

Tonight sees the biggest names in pop go head-to-head in one of the most anticipated nights of the British musical calendar.

Crouch End Festival Chorus/ Temple, Barbican

There are choral societies and there are choral societies – and Crouch End Festival Chorus is one of the more interesting.

L-R: Anne Robinson, 'Trouble with the ball'; Gaddafi, 'A great bloke'; Bernie Ecclestone, ' Inferiority complex'; Kelly Cates, 'It's all too much for me'

Tweets, quips and clangers: Football quotes of the year

Football's a funny old game, never more so than in 2011 when those involved opened their mouths – or took to their mobiles

Stereophonics, Shepherds Bush Empire, London

You would think Kelly Jones would have to more to say at his first gigs in a year, yet, true to form, half an hour passes before he can muster a simple “Here’s one for ya.”

Looking back in anger: the Gallagher brothers

Be angry in your lyrics, not on the stand

News that Noel Gallagher is to take his brother to court reminds us there are few more dispiriting sights for dedicated music fans than seeing their heroes on the way to hearings. Trussed up in unfamiliar shirt and tie combinations, they look as uncomfortable as ex-lags at job interviews. It is bad enough when artists attend divorce proceedings or face the beak for falling asleep at the wheel, but far worse is when they have brought the suit (legal, not sartorial) themselves. Any dealings with the legal system are bound to make the protagonist look petty-minded, venal or underhand.

Looking back in anger: the Gallagher brothers

Be angry in your lyrics, not on the witness stand

Taking fellow bandmates to court is usually a mistake, says Chris Mugan

Noel and Liam go at it in the High Court

The deterioration in relations between the Gallagher brothers was revealed in papers lodged at the High Court, detailing accusations of domestic abuse, violent assault and a pattern of "spiteful and childish" behaviour.

Noel Gallagher's wonder-wife

Noel Gallagher says his wife has got more beautiful since she married him.

Tales From The Water Cooler: Barton scores with highbrow quotes

Footballers, specifically English footballers, have long had to disguise any hint of an intellectual hinterland. During his playing career, middle-class Chelsea veteran Graeme Le Saux famously confessed to reading a certain left-leaning broadsheet. He was subjected to years of homophobic abuse from fans and fellow players.

Latest stories from i100
Career Services

Day In a Page

A
Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine