Noel Gallagher

Where did it all go wrong for Britpop?

1997: when 3 Colours Red were the next Oasis and no one had heard of digital piracy. Craig McLean was right there, and as the forthcoming film 'Kill Your Friends' revisits the last, deluded golden age of the British record industry, he recalls the excess, the greed, and the hangover

Album review: Jake Bugg, Shangri La, Virgin/EMI

If the challenge faced by Jake Bugg on his second album is to prove you can take the boy out of Clifton (the Nottingham council estate where he was born) without taking all traces of Clifton out of the boy, then it’s one he rises to. Those who see Bugg’s so-called “authenticity” — whatever that means — as a storm of hype might spy signs of “grooming” in the decision to record in LA with producer Rick Rubin, but the follow-up to his hit debut makes the Midlands-to-Malibu move look largely seamless: as an exercise in expanded range, Shangri La is too diverse and distinct to dismiss.

New book of poetry celebrates The Beatles' impact

It is one of the most quoted gobbets of British poetry: “Sexual intercourse began/ In nineteen sixty-three/(which was rather late for me) –/Between the end of the Chatterley ban/And the Beatles’ first LP.”

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The Timeline: Glastonbury Festival

Farmer Michael Eavis decides to hold a festival to pay off his overdraft. With tickets costing £1 and free milk provided, 1,500 people descend on Worthy Farm near Pilton in Somerset to watch sets from the likes of T Rex (standing in for The Kinks). Eavis is so enamoured with it he decides to continue.