Arts and Entertainment Picasso's 'Man with Opera Hat' is being auctioned online for €100 in association with Sotheby's

A 25-year-old American, who paid €100 for his raffle ticket, said he had been looking for a picture to hang on his living room

The Guernica Tapestry, Whitechapel Gallery, London

Picasso's fury screams out still

Picasso's 'Guernica' returns to London

A full-size replica of Pablo Picasso's anti-war painting, Guernica, was unveiled in London yesterday. The tapestry version on display at the Whitechapel Art Gallery has hung for 24 years just outside the UN Security Council chamber in New York.

David Lister: We don't need a Cultural Olympiad

This week I received a letter from some of the biggest worthies in the arts – the likes of Nicholas Hytner of the National Theatre, Kevin Spacey of the Old Vic, Michael Boyd of the Royal Shakespeare Company, Michael Grandage of the Donmar, and Mike Attenborough of the Almeida. They wanted to share their concern that in the present climate the arts were under real threat of losing much of their private sponsorship. Artistic output is likely to be affected. These are fast becoming financially difficult times for the arts.

Bernard Buffet: Return of the 'poser'

For 50 years, French artist Bernard Buffet was reviled but rich, a victim of Picasso's jealousy and his country's snobbery. John Lichfield tracks a surprise revival

Picasso: Don’t look back

There’s so much to say about Picasso’s relationship with the artists of today. So why on earth has the National Gallery gone down the tired route of linking him to the old masters?

Eluned Phillips: The only woman poet to have won the National Eisteddfod's Crown twice

Eluned Phillips was unusual among Welsh writers of her generation in that she embraced a bohemian lifestyle which took her to pre-war London and Paris, where she made the acquaintance of such major artists as Augustus John, Dylan Thomas, Edith Piaf, Jean Cocteau, Maurice Chevalier and Pablo Picasso, the last of whom showed her the unfinished Guernica with the paint still wet on the canvas. She even made it to Casablanca, where she might easily have fitted in among the habitués of Rick's Bar. Nearer home, she was only the second woman to win the Crown, one of the major literary prizes awarded at the National Eisteddfod, and this she achieved on two occasions: first in 1967 and again in 1983. It was for this remarkable feat rather than her picaresque adventures in foreign parts that she was most admired in her native Wales.

Picasso fever keeps Parisians up all night

Art fans queue in freezing temperatures as museum stays open to satisfy demand

Coming Soon: The fine art of copycatting

I 've often argued the case for shutting the National Portrait Gallery down, but until someone gets around to listening to me, you might as well see this spring's overlapping Constable and Gerhard Richter shows there ( www.npg.org.uk, 5 March to 14 June and 26 February to 17 May respectively). Portraiture is not really what Constable was about, but his pictures of kith and kin and the folk of Dedham Vale are bright as brass buttons even so. Whether it's useful to think of Richter's wonderful photo-based figure paintings as portraits is a matter for debate, but they have certainly been influential on younger artists such as Glenn Brown (pictured).

Thieves steal Picasso work from gallery

Thieves stole works by Pablo Picasso, Henri Matisse and others from a Berlin gallery over the New Year's holiday, police said yesterday.

Spot the difference: the 'genuine fake' masterpieces

John Myatt was jailed for forgeries that fooled the auction houses. Now he has a 'genuine fakes' exhibition. Arifa Akbar reports

The art of love: Edouard Manet

A brazen encounter with sexual commodity

Is the National Gallery prostituting itself just to pull in the punters?

A walk-through installation that recreates Amsterdam's red light district would not look out of place in the Tate Modern's immense Turbine Hall. But Hoerengracht – Dutch for whore's alley – is among the highlights of the National Gallery's exhibition programme for 2009.

Leading article: Past masters

Paris is showing Picasso's work alongside the great masters who influenced him. Now the Tate is planning to do the same for Turner. Neither artist would be embarrassed by the comparisons. Indeed, both set themselves up to vie with their predecessors. Arrogance, no doubt. Yet it is precisely that self-confidence, that reach to compare oneself with the very best, that makes a great artist. And in that reach also lies respect. You cannot fully comprehend the work of one giant without understanding their relationship with the influences of the past.

Holy Picasso!: The Brit at the centre of a £6bn art row

Derek Gillman is an English academic in charge of the biggest private collection of art in America. He is also the man accused of evicting this £6bn treasure from its rightful home – and of betraying the radical vision of the man who created.

Armani steps into the ring to design matador's outfit

Giorgio Armani is to design the suit of lights for one of Spain's top bullfighters in a corrida [bullfight] to celebrate the heyday of the taurine art.

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Apartheid’s sadistic killer that his country cannot forgive

The debate rages in South Africa over whether Eugene de Kock should ever be released from jail
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Commonwealth Games 2014: Dai Greene prays for chance to rebuild after injury agony

Greene prays for chance to rebuild after injury agony

Welsh hurdler was World, European and Commonwealth champion, but then the injuries crept in
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Patrick Cockburn: Secret report helps Israel to hide facts

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The man who dared to go on holiday

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