The view from the eco-experts

Howard Jacobson: If you think that Prozac works, then it doesn't really matter what the experts say

What scientists never understand is that human beings aren't governed by science

Who’s Whose? A No-Nonsense Guide to Easily Confused Words.

This weekend, The Independent on Sunday is giving away a book: Who’s Whose? A No-Nonsense Guide to Easily Confused Words.

Inside Britain's happiest eco-town

Never mind solar panels and protesters – one new low-carbon development is designed above all to build a sense of community. Donnachadh McCarthy finds peace and love

Eco: North Yorkshire

Natural Retreats is proof that green doesn't have to mean grunge. Its first development opened early last year, a collection of eight lodges set in 50 scenic, privately owned, acres of North Yorkshire countryside. Built from sustainable timber and glass, with insulation made from recycled paper, living-plant roofs and solar and green energy, the lodges also come with sleek open-plan kitchen and dining areas, solid oak flooring, cedar decking, flat-screen TVs, CD and DVD players and rain showers.

Sarah Sands: A time for giving the wrong impression

Reading between the lines of her greetings cards

Pets' corner: The ideal puppy for a two-year-old and exercise for rabbits

Your questions answered by Chamois Rose-Wood

Steve Richards: Don't be fooled by nice words and a new logo: the Tories have not really changed

Europe troubles Cameron as the miners' strike afflicted Kinnock when he sought to remake his party

Tory leader may abandon hardline policy on Europe

David Cameron is struggling to deliver the hardline policy on Europe on which he fought last year's Tory leadership election and may kick his plan into the long grass.

The Investment Column: Labour pains pay off for joyous Mothercare

Hold on to paper maker DS Smith; Why it's all systems go at Gooch & Housego

What's wrong with frightening the children?

The best children's classics are all X-certificate with their pain, perversion, torture, and violent death

Mystery boy from Brazil on fast track to stardom

Antonio Lindback was abandoned as a baby and does not even know his exact age. Yet he has taken the world of speedway by storm

40,000 'splatometers' can't be wrong: insect population is in decline

Nearly 40,000 conservation-minded drivers counted the bugs splattered on their vehicle number plates this summer, the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB) announced yesterday.

Latest stories from i100
Career Services

Day In a Page

A
Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine