Rugby Union: Oh Calcutta in five acts

1957: England 16 Scotland 3

No sex, no drugs, and too much rock'n'roll

CINEMA

Gored to death

'My favourite quote of all is from Hitchcock: "Other people's films are slices of life. Mine are slices of cake." ' Peter Jackson (left), director of 'The Frighteners', talks to Ryan Gilbey

Spooky? Not a ghost of a chance

The Frighteners

Director's cut / Ray Harryhausen was never the same again after he saw King Kong

Fantasy films have always attracted me the most. I remember seeing things like Metropolis and The Lost World at a very early age, back in the silent days, because my parents were avid cinema-goers. It was the imagination that goes into fantasy films that really drew me to cinema in the first place. And then, in 1933, when I was 13, I saw King Kong. And I haven't been the same since. It was the greatest excursion into fantasy I had ever seen, and it just struck a chord in me - that was when I knew I wanted to pursue that as a career.

They shoot turkeys, don't they?

Struggling film-makers are the focus of the Gijon Film Festival. Richard Combs was a member of the jury...

CASE SUMMARIES v 23 October 1995

The following notes of judgments were prepared by the reporters of the All England Law Reports.

Justice for the Simian One

Has ever a fictional character been so mistreated and maligned? The novelist Will Self (above) defends the reputation of King Kong

After Jane Campion . . .

PETER JACKSON'S Heavenly Creatures (18) is a film that slips the surly bonds of genre. It's a murder story without a mystery, a romance that lacks a single clinch, an airy fantasy that ends in wrenching brutality. With wit and daring, Jackson whisks us around two adolescent girls' minds, on a guided tour of their most garish fantasies and deluded, delirious dreams. Imagination is both the film's subject, and its strength.

A leap into the dark

Adam Mars-Jones reviews Heavenly Creatures, a poetic portrait of two te enagers whose fantasies led to matricide

The 50s: a decade when women wore pink meringues

Prom frocks and arch glamour from the Fifties are returning to the forefront of fashion and to the cinema screen. Marion Hume reports

AND WATCH THESE FACES . . .

Ian Hart We know Ian Hart as John Lennon, whom he played in last year's Backbeat, and again in The Hours and the Times, a low-budget drama all about the never-quite-consummated love between Lennon and Brian Epstein. Both performances were stunning, (and each show ed a different side of the rogue Beatle) but in 1995 Hart will show that he has other strings to his bow (or guitar). He appears in no less than three British features: with Hugh Grant in The Englishman Who Went Up a Hill and Came Down a Mountain; in Clo ckwork Mice, Gary Sinyor's follow-up to Leon the Pig Farmer; and as the lead in Ken Loach's Spanish Civil War drama Land and Freedom.

Film: Ticket to die for: The London Film Festival opens next week at the National Film Theatre. Ryan Gilbey selects 10 of the most interesting offerings . . .

If you thought this was the year of touchy-feely Forrest Gumpness, think again. Whatever you choose from this year's selection of 180 new features at the London Film Festival, there's bound to be a corpse hidden in there somewhere. When Reservoir Dogs played at the LFF two years ago, the concern about, and lust for, violence had just begun to stir with films like The Living End and Benny's Video. Now, with Pulp Fiction in town, not to mention Killing Zoe and Sleep With Me , it's all become too much. With that in mind, and with telephone booking opening today (071-928 3232), here's a preliminary guide to 10 films you shouldn't miss.

The Reith lectures 1994: Beautiful Beasts: The Call of the Wild: Marina Warner's fourth lecture in the series 'Managing Monsters' looks at the changing value of animals in myth, from Romulus and Remus to King Kong

This is an edited version of last night's talk on Radio 4, which will be repeated at 9.10pm this Saturday on Radio 3. Next Wednesday's lecture, 'Cannibal Tales: The Hunger for Conquest', will be published in the 'Independent' the following day.

Briton released

Yemeni tribesmen freed a Briton and a Canadian working for a US oil company yesterday after holding them hostage for nearly two weeks, a senior company official said, Reuter reports from Sanaa. Briton Peter Jackson, 49, was reunited with his wife Valerie in Sanaa.
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Indiana serial killer? Man arrested for murdering teenage prostitute confesses to six other murders - and police fear there could be many more

A new American serial killer?

Police fear man arrested for murder of teen prostitute could be responsible for killing spree dating back 20 years
Sweetie, the fake 10-year-old girl designed to catch online predators, claims her first scalp

Sting to trap paedophiles may not carry weight in UK courts

Computer image of ‘Sweetie’ represented entrapment, experts say
Fukushima nuclear crisis: Evacuees still stuck in cramped emergency housing three years on - and may never return home

Return to Fukushima – a land they will never call home again

Evacuees still stuck in cramped emergency housing three years on from nuclear disaster
Wildlife Photographer of the Year: Intimate image of resting lions claims top prize

Wildlife Photographer of the Year

Intimate image of resting lions claims top prize
Online petitions: Sign here to change the world

Want to change the world? Just sign here

The proliferation of online petitions allows us to register our protests at the touch of a button. But do they change anything?
Ed Sheeran hits back after being labelled too boring to headline festivals

'You need me, I don’t need you'

Ed Sheeran hits back after being labelled too boring to headline festivals
How to Get Away with Murder: Shonda Rhimes reinvents the legal drama

How to Get Away with Murder

Shonda Rhimes reinvents the legal drama
A cup of tea is every worker's right

Hard to swallow

Three hospitals in Leicester have banned their staff from drinking tea and coffee in public areas. Christopher Hirst explains why he thinks that a cuppa is every worker's right
Which animals are nearly extinct?

Which animals are nearly extinct?

Conservationists in Kenya are in mourning after the death of a white northern rhino, which has left the species with a single male. These are the other species on the brink
12 best children's shoes

Perfect for leaf-kicking: 12 best children's shoes

Find footwear perfect to keep kids' feet protected this autumn
Anderlecht vs Arsenal: Gunners' ray of light Aaron Ramsey shines again

Arsenal’s ray of light ready to shine again

Aaron Ramsey’s injury record has prompted a club investigation. For now, the midfielder is just happy to be fit to face Anderlecht in the Champions League
Comment: David Moyes' show of sensitivity thrown back in his face by former Manchester United manager Sir Alex Ferguson

Moyes’ show of sensitivity thrown back in his face... by Ferguson

Manchester United legend tramples on successor who resisted criticising his inheritance
Two super-sized ships have cruised into British waters, but how big can these behemoths get?

Super-sized ships: How big can they get?

Two of the largest vessels in the world cruised into UK waters last week
British doctors on brink of 'cure' for paralysis with spinal cord treatment

British doctors on brink of cure for paralysis

Sufferers can now be offered the possibility of cure thanks to a revolutionary implant of regenerative cells
Ranked seventh in world’s best tourist cities - not London, or Edinburgh, but Salisbury

Lonely Planet’s Best in Travel 2015

UK city beats Vienna, Paris and New York to be ranked seventh in world’s best tourist destinations - but it's not London