News Jeremy Paxman announced what he thought the internet was really for during a segment on Wednesday night’s show

Jeremy Paxman announced what he thought the internet was really for during a segment on Wednesday night’s show

After 1990: the airwave revolution

The 1990 Broadcasting Act established the Radio Authority and its remit to extend listener choice. The authority has overseen the creation of Classic FM, Virgin 1215 and TalkRadio UK.

Phil Collins: sage or potato? : THE CRITICS : Rock

THE KEY line of Phil Collins's latest album, Both Sides, is: "We always need to hear both sides of the story." One side of the story is that Collins is one of Britain's best percussionists, and a talented singer, writer and multi-instrumentalist w ho hasmastered even the bagpipes. (Amazing pop fact: Phil Collins and Eternal both played in London on Wednesday, and both played "Amazing Grace" and "You Can't Hurry Love".) The other side is that Collins is a dullard who released 1993's dullest record , andwhose head, according to a vintage cartoon by the IoS's Martin Rowson, has long since been replaced by a giant potato.

Train robber Edwards is found hanged

Ronald ''Buster'' Edwards, arguably the most feted of the Great Train Robbers, was found hanged in a lock-up garage yesterday after apparently committing suicide.

Throwing it away

ROCK star Phil Collins is divorcing his wife, Jill, after 10 years of marriage. Collins, 43, who belongs to the band Genesis has a five-year-old daughter.

Bunhill: Dancing giant

LARGE companies have a fondness for attaching military sounding nicknames to internal initiatives, forgetting that they are often bastardised by sceptical staff.

TELEVISION / Let's all write a letter to Uncle Douglas

IN THURSDAY's Party Political Broadcast (BBC, ITV), an apple-cheeked toddler was strapped in her mother's car and driven into a world rotten to the core. Through the window, she saw all manner of foreign Johnnies - wailing Bosnians, beefy Iraqis. Her pupils bloomed with apprehension but - never fear - Uncle Douglas Hurd is here] With that lashless, foetal stare, the Foreign Secretary does not look entirely human. But the voice - husky authority honeyed with patrician charm - reassures. For the benefit of the boys and girls at home who get a bit upset seeing fellow creatures slaughtered, Uncle Douglas told a story about foreign policy. 'The first principle must be to stand up for British interests.' No good would come of helping others, he explained. 'Britain stands tall in the world.' Odd that. Two nights before, Death of a Nation (ITV), John Pilger's report on East Timor, had suggested that Britain belonged on its knees - begging forgiveness of the 300,000 souls murdered by Indonesians flying planes sold to them by Uncle Douglas's chums. Here was a bedtime story to keep you awake all night, and make the morning dark.

ART / And What's More. . .

Northern Shell is to publish Britain's first mainstream gay lifestyle magazine, a 136-page glossy - expect the first issue around February 1994 . . . Thanks, but no thanks (1): Phil Collins turned down the chance to singalong with Ol' Blue Eyes on the Duets album, preferring not to sing down a telephone to the crooner's recording studio . . . Thanks but no thanks (2): John Major declined the opportunity to appear on the final episode of Thatcher: The Downing Street Years (BBC1) - he was 'too busy' . . . Julian Clary's tour video is memorably entitled My Glittering Passage, complete with alternative version of 'Over the Rainbow' and disco dancing tips . . .

Phil Collins wins court fight over bootleg recordings

THE European Court of Justice ruled yesterday that the British rock star, Phil Collins, was entitled to stop a German record company selling unauthorised recordings of his works.

View from City Road: PolyGram deal is sweet music

They shook their heads in pity when Thorn-EMI paid out pounds 510m and took on debt of pounds 50m for Richard Branson's Virgin Music Group last year. For a price equivalent to 40 times earnings Thorn got the Rolling Stones, Phil Collins and Genesis along with just pounds 3m of assets.

A new watch could be in your future

JUDGING by the flood of entries, the cafetiere is a subject dear to your hearts. Many were excellent. Tom Parker, of west London, wrote: 'With the 2003 prohibition on caffeine-based products the state banned the cafetiere, which had become the fighting standard of coffee-drinking zealots. They were destroyed or converted to potato mashers. . . .'

Saturday Night: Strike while the suntan is hot, my mother told me

ALMOST 10 years ago, when I was 15, I desperately fancied a boy called Naz, who I had managed to snog at a disco just before I went on holiday to Spain. I spent the whole holiday firming my buttocks, flattening my stomach, toning my upper arms and, following a Jason Donovan fashion tip, putting lemon juice in my hair.

The Campaign for Cheaper CDs: MPs ready to demand cut in price of CDs

THE MUSIC industry is to be denounced by an all-party committee of MPs over the price of compact discs. Following a year-long campaign by the Independent on Sunday, members of the Commons Select Committee on National Heritage have accepted that prices are too high.

My Record Collection: ANDY PARTRIDGE - XTC

THE FIRST RECORD I BOUGHT

ROCK / Masters of hype leave hoi polloi standing

IN THE beginning was the word, and the word was 'money'. The pounds 22.50 on the front of the ticket is only the start: by the time you add the booking fee, the petrol, the car park, the programme, the survival rations at restaurant prices and perhaps a T-shirt, you are well in excess of a sum Phil Collins might call 'a bull's-eye'. This looks like a lot to the layman, but pop music is an expensive business, and it's a price nearly 120,000 people are willing to pay for the privilege of standing around all day in a Hertfordshire field, waiting for the 60th coming of Genesis.
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Two super-sized ships have cruised into British waters, but how big can these behemoths get?

Super-sized ships: How big can they get?

Two of the largest vessels in the world cruised into UK waters last week
British doctors on brink of 'cure' for paralysis with spinal cord treatment

British doctors on brink of cure for paralysis

Sufferers can now be offered the possibility of cure thanks to a revolutionary implant of regenerative cells
Let's talk about loss

We need to talk about loss

Secrecy and silence surround stillbirth
Will there be an all-female mission to Mars?

Will there be an all-female mission to Mars?

Women may be better suited to space travel than men are
Oscar Pistorius sentencing: The athlete's wealth and notoriety have provoked a long overdue debate on South African prisons

'They poured water on, then electrified me...'

If Oscar Pistorius is sent to jail, his experience will not be that of other inmates
James Wharton: The former Guard now fighting discrimination against gay soldiers

The former Guard now fighting discrimination against gay soldiers

Life after the Army has brought new battles for the LGBT activist James Wharton
Ebola in the US: Panic over the virus threatens to infect President Obama's midterms

Panic over Ebola threatens to infect the midterms

Just one person has died, yet November's elections may be affected by what Republicans call 'Obama's Katrina', says Rupert Cornwell
Premier League coaches join the RSC to swap the tricks of their trades

Darling, you were fabulous! But offside...

Premier League coaches are joining the RSC to learn acting skills, and in turn they will teach its actors to play football. Nick Clark finds out why
How to dress with authority: Kirsty Wark and Camila Batmanghelidjh discuss the changing role of fashion in women's workwear

How to dress with authority

Kirsty Wark and Camila Batmanghelidjh discuss the changing role of fashion in women's workwear
New book on Joy Division's Ian Curtis sheds new light on the life of the late singer

New book on Ian Curtis sheds fresh light on the life of the late singer

'Joy Division were making art... Ian was for real' says author Jon Savage
Sean Harris: A rare interview with British acting's secret weapon

Sean Harris: A rare interview with British acting's secret weapon

The Bafta-winner talks Hollywood, being branded a psycho, and how Barbra Streisand is his true inspiration
Tim Minchin, interview: The musician, comedian and world's favourite ginger is on scorching form

Tim Minchin interview

For a no-holds-barred comedian who is scathing about woolly thinking and oppressive religiosity, he is surprisingly gentle in person
Boris Johnson's boozing won't win the puritan vote

Boris's boozing won't win the puritan vote

Many of us Brits still disapprove of conspicuous consumption – it's the way we were raised, says DJ Taylor
Ash frontman Tim Wheeler reveals how he came to terms with his father's dementia

Tim Wheeler: Alzheimer's, memories and my dad

Wheeler's dad suffered from Alzheimer's for three years. When he died, there was only one way the Ash frontman knew how to respond: with a heartfelt solo album