News Jeremy Paxman announced what he thought the internet was really for during a segment on Wednesday night’s show

Jeremy Paxman announced what he thought the internet was really for during a segment on Wednesday night’s show

After 1990: the airwave revolution

The 1990 Broadcasting Act established the Radio Authority and its remit to extend listener choice. The authority has overseen the creation of Classic FM, Virgin 1215 and TalkRadio UK.

Phil Collins: sage or potato? : THE CRITICS : Rock

THE KEY line of Phil Collins's latest album, Both Sides, is: "We always need to hear both sides of the story." One side of the story is that Collins is one of Britain's best percussionists, and a talented singer, writer and multi-instrumentalist w ho hasmastered even the bagpipes. (Amazing pop fact: Phil Collins and Eternal both played in London on Wednesday, and both played "Amazing Grace" and "You Can't Hurry Love".) The other side is that Collins is a dullard who released 1993's dullest record , andwhose head, according to a vintage cartoon by the IoS's Martin Rowson, has long since been replaced by a giant potato.

Train robber Edwards is found hanged

Ronald ''Buster'' Edwards, arguably the most feted of the Great Train Robbers, was found hanged in a lock-up garage yesterday after apparently committing suicide.

Throwing it away

ROCK star Phil Collins is divorcing his wife, Jill, after 10 years of marriage. Collins, 43, who belongs to the band Genesis has a five-year-old daughter.

Bunhill: Dancing giant

LARGE companies have a fondness for attaching military sounding nicknames to internal initiatives, forgetting that they are often bastardised by sceptical staff.

TELEVISION / Let's all write a letter to Uncle Douglas

IN THURSDAY's Party Political Broadcast (BBC, ITV), an apple-cheeked toddler was strapped in her mother's car and driven into a world rotten to the core. Through the window, she saw all manner of foreign Johnnies - wailing Bosnians, beefy Iraqis. Her pupils bloomed with apprehension but - never fear - Uncle Douglas Hurd is here] With that lashless, foetal stare, the Foreign Secretary does not look entirely human. But the voice - husky authority honeyed with patrician charm - reassures. For the benefit of the boys and girls at home who get a bit upset seeing fellow creatures slaughtered, Uncle Douglas told a story about foreign policy. 'The first principle must be to stand up for British interests.' No good would come of helping others, he explained. 'Britain stands tall in the world.' Odd that. Two nights before, Death of a Nation (ITV), John Pilger's report on East Timor, had suggested that Britain belonged on its knees - begging forgiveness of the 300,000 souls murdered by Indonesians flying planes sold to them by Uncle Douglas's chums. Here was a bedtime story to keep you awake all night, and make the morning dark.

ART / And What's More. . .

Northern Shell is to publish Britain's first mainstream gay lifestyle magazine, a 136-page glossy - expect the first issue around February 1994 . . . Thanks, but no thanks (1): Phil Collins turned down the chance to singalong with Ol' Blue Eyes on the Duets album, preferring not to sing down a telephone to the crooner's recording studio . . . Thanks but no thanks (2): John Major declined the opportunity to appear on the final episode of Thatcher: The Downing Street Years (BBC1) - he was 'too busy' . . . Julian Clary's tour video is memorably entitled My Glittering Passage, complete with alternative version of 'Over the Rainbow' and disco dancing tips . . .

Phil Collins wins court fight over bootleg recordings

THE European Court of Justice ruled yesterday that the British rock star, Phil Collins, was entitled to stop a German record company selling unauthorised recordings of his works.

View from City Road: PolyGram deal is sweet music

They shook their heads in pity when Thorn-EMI paid out pounds 510m and took on debt of pounds 50m for Richard Branson's Virgin Music Group last year. For a price equivalent to 40 times earnings Thorn got the Rolling Stones, Phil Collins and Genesis along with just pounds 3m of assets.

Saturday Night: Strike while the suntan is hot, my mother told me

ALMOST 10 years ago, when I was 15, I desperately fancied a boy called Naz, who I had managed to snog at a disco just before I went on holiday to Spain. I spent the whole holiday firming my buttocks, flattening my stomach, toning my upper arms and, following a Jason Donovan fashion tip, putting lemon juice in my hair.

A new watch could be in your future

JUDGING by the flood of entries, the cafetiere is a subject dear to your hearts. Many were excellent. Tom Parker, of west London, wrote: 'With the 2003 prohibition on caffeine-based products the state banned the cafetiere, which had become the fighting standard of coffee-drinking zealots. They were destroyed or converted to potato mashers. . . .'

The Campaign for Cheaper CDs: MPs ready to demand cut in price of CDs

THE MUSIC industry is to be denounced by an all-party committee of MPs over the price of compact discs. Following a year-long campaign by the Independent on Sunday, members of the Commons Select Committee on National Heritage have accepted that prices are too high.

My Record Collection: ANDY PARTRIDGE - XTC

THE FIRST RECORD I BOUGHT

ROCK / Masters of hype leave hoi polloi standing

IN THE beginning was the word, and the word was 'money'. The pounds 22.50 on the front of the ticket is only the start: by the time you add the booking fee, the petrol, the car park, the programme, the survival rations at restaurant prices and perhaps a T-shirt, you are well in excess of a sum Phil Collins might call 'a bull's-eye'. This looks like a lot to the layman, but pop music is an expensive business, and it's a price nearly 120,000 people are willing to pay for the privilege of standing around all day in a Hertfordshire field, waiting for the 60th coming of Genesis.
News
Bryan had a bracelet given to him by his late father stolen during the raid
people
Sport
Vincenzo Nibali of Italy and the Astana Pro Team races to fourth place in the individual time trial
tour de franceas fourth place in time-trial sees him ride to Paris glory on Sunday
Sport
Tour de France competitor Bartosz Huzarski’s legs have highlighted the gruelling nature of the race, after he posted a picture on Facebook showing extremely prominent veins stretching from his feet and all the way up his legs
News
A rub on the tummy sprang Casey back to life
video
Arts and Entertainment
On set of the Secret Cinema's Back to the Future event
filmBut why were Back to the Future screenings cancelled?
News
Susan Sarandon described David Bowie as
peopleSusan Sarandon reveals more on her David Bowie romance
Sport
Lewis Hamilton walks back to the pit lane with his Mercedes burning in the background
Formula 1
Arts and Entertainment
The new characters were announced yesterday at San Diego Comic Con
comic-con 2014
Sport
Arsenal supporters gather for a recent ‘fan party’ in New Jersey
football
Career Services

Day In a Page

Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
Sicily – seven nights from £939pp
Pompeii, Capri and the Bay of Naples - seven nights from £799pp
Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
Mary Rose – two nights from £319pp
Best comedians: How the professionals go about their funny business, from Sarah Millican to Marcus Brigstocke

Best comedians: How the professionals go about their funny business

For all those wanting to know how stand-ups keep standing, here are some of the best moments
Jokes on Hollywood: 'With comedy film audiences shrinking, it’s time to move on'

Jokes on Hollywood

With comedy film audiences shrinking, it’s time to move on
Edinburgh Fringe 2014: The comedy highlights, from Bridget Christie to Jack Dee

Edinburgh Fringe 2014

The comedy highlights, from Bridget Christie to Jack Dee
Evan Davis: The BBC’s wolf in sheep’s clothing to take over at Newsnight

The BBC’s wolf in sheep’s clothing

What will Evan Davis be like on Newsnight?
Finding the names for America’s shame: What happens to the immigrants crossing the US-Mexico border without documents who never make it past the Arizona desert?

Finding the names for America’s shame

The immigrants crossing the US-Mexico border without documents who never make it past the Arizona desert
Inside a church for Born Again Christians: Speaking to God in a Manchester multiplex

Inside a church for Born Again Christians

As Britain's Anglican church struggles to establish its modern identity, one branch of Christianity is booming
Rihanna, Kim Kardashian and me: How Olivier Rousteing is revitalising the house of Balmain

Olivier Rousteing is revitalising the house of Balmain

Parisian couturier Pierre Balmain made his name dressing the mid-century jet set. Today, Olivier Rousteing – heir to the house Pierre built – is celebrating their 21st-century equivalents. The result? Nothing short of Balmania
Cancer, cardiac arrest, HIV and homelessness - and he's only 39

Incredible survival story of David Tovey

Tovey went from cooking for the Queen to rifling through bins for his supper. His is a startling story of endurance against the odds – and of a social safety net failing at every turn
Backhanders, bribery and abuses of power have soared in China as economy surges

Bribery and abuses of power soar in China

The bribery is fuelled by the surge in China's economy but the rules of corruption are subtle and unspoken, finds Evan Osnos, as he learns the dark arts from a master
Commonwealth Games 2014: Highland terriers stole the show at the opening ceremony

Highland terriers steal the show at opening ceremony

Gillian Orr explores why a dog loved by film stars and presidents is finally having its day
German art world rocked as artists use renowned fat sculpture to distil schnapps

Brewing the fat from artwork angers widow of sculptor

Part of Joseph Beuys' 1982 sculpture 'Fettecke' used to distil schnapps
BBC's The Secret History of Our Streets reveals a fascinating window into Britain's past

BBC takes viewers back down memory lane

The Secret History of Our Streets, which returns with three films looking at Scottish streets, is the inverse of Benefits Street - delivering warmth instead of cynicism
Joe, film review: Nicolas Cage delivers an astonishing performance in low budget drama

Nicolas Cage shines in low-budget drama Joe

Cage plays an ex-con in David Gordon Green's independent drama, which has been adapted from a novel by Larry Brown
How to make your own gourmet ice lollies, granitas, slushy cocktails and frozen yoghurt

Make your own ice lollies and frozen yoghurt

Think outside the cool box for this summer's tempting frozen treats
Ford Fiesta is UK's most popular car of all-time, with sales topping 4.1 million since 1976

Fiesta is UK's most popular car of all-time

Sales have topped 4.1 million since 1976. To celebrate this milestone, four Independent writers recall their Fiestas with pride