Arts and Entertainment

A boy enters a palace of a hundred rooms where an assassin may lurk behind every door and shadowy figures are reflected in a Hall of Mirrors.  An astonishing treasure lies at its heart, but powerful enemies are at the gates.

Queen Victoria's diaries to go online

The Queen has launched a website documenting the life of her great-great-grandmother Queen Victoria in her own words - but revealed she had no plans to publish her own diaries.

Bernadotte and his second wife, Gunilla, in Stockholm in 2010

Count Carl Johan Bernadotte

Count Carl Johan Bernadotte, who died on 5 May aged 95, was a member of the Swedish royal family who lost his title and succession rights when he married a commoner. He was also the last surviving grandchild of Queen Victoria.

'Sick' Ed Miliband spotted at football match

Ed Miliband was spotted at a football match this weekend just three hours after he was due to give a speech that he cancelled due to illness.

Queen's Jubilee portrait revealed

A new Diamond Jubilee portrait of the Queen has been released by Buckingham Palace today. The photograph, taken to mark the 60th anniversary of the accession to the throne of Queen Elizabeth II, was taken in the Centre Room of Buckingham Palace by John Swannell.

Pop and rock royalty to play at free concert for jubilee

Sir Paul McCartney will headline a free public concert to mark the Queen's Diamond Jubilee. The former Beatle will be among a concert line-up that will feature artists from across the 60 years of the monarch's reign, playing in front of Buckingham Palace on 4 June.

HRH: she reigns but she does not rule. She is powerless, but her influence is oceanic

The Queen: Majesty and modesty

It is 60 years since she succeeded to the throne – a reign in which her sense of duty and absolute retention of royal mystique has only deepened her subjects’ affection for her.

What the...? Dickens to get unwanted statue

The design has been chosen for the United Kingdom's first-ever statue of its greatest novelist, Charles Dickens, in spite of his request, made at his funeral, that there should be no monuments in his honour.

The Arsenic Century, By James C. Whorton

It's curious how the most unlikely topics can generate books of the utmost interest. Whorton has done this with arsenic poisoning, both deliberate and accidental, in 19th century Britain.

Last Night's TV - Timeshift: All the Fun of the Fair, BBC4; DIY SOS:the Big Build, BBC1

When Britons had the ride of their lives

Some barking subjects for an art show

Vintage photographs of dogs may not be everybody's cup of tea – even if they are early daguerreotypes. But for dog-lovers, Photography Going to the Dogs at London's Kennel Club Art Gallery is an essential experience.

As Good As God, As Clever As The Devil, By Rodney Bolt

Anthony Powell once came up with an ingenious theory of Victorian upward social mobility. Such ascents generally extended over three generations, he proposed. The first made the money and the second consolidated the social position. Come the third, decadence would set in, often accompanied by distinction in the arts, and an inability to produce heirs. Powell's template was the Firbanks: self-made railway-contractor grandfather; Tory MP son; and dandy-novelist homosexual grandson, Ronald.

The Victorians: Long to reign over us

Those alive in the Victorian age would be astounded to see our enthusiasm for their ideas. What does it say about us, asks DJ Taylor, that we are still working to their ancient templates?

The Sketch: Four hours is a long time for Prince Philip to behave himself

There must have been a moment or two there where the Duke of Edinburgh had to bite his tongue. Maybe the Queen had had it bitten for him. Maybe she'd asked Barack to bring him as a gift those "fell pony bits and shanks" (this had to be repeated to us hacks three or four times). Maybe he was wearing the bits to stop saying the things he is famous for saying as they showed POTUS and FLOTUS around the displays in the Royal Collection.

Richard Ingrams: No love lost between lawyers and journalists

This week, The Times asked "100 top lawyers" if they were in favour of public figures having the right to resort to law in order to keep their business and private affairs secret. Yes, they said. Only 27 per cent were against.

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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 1 May 2015
Fishing for votes with Nigel Farage: The Ukip leader shows how he can work an audience as he casts his line to the disaffected of Grimsby

Fishing is on Nigel Farage's mind

Ukip leader casts a line to the disaffected
Who is bombing whom in the Middle East? It's amazing they don't all hit each other

Who is bombing whom in the Middle East?

Robert Fisk untangles the countries and factions
China's influence on fashion: At the top of the game both creatively and commercially

China's influence on fashion

At the top of the game both creatively and commercially
Lord O’Donnell: Former cabinet secretary on the election and life away from the levers of power

The man known as GOD has a reputation for getting the job done

Lord O'Donnell's three principles of rule
Rainbow shades: It's all bright on the night

Rainbow shades

It's all bright on the night
'It was first time I had ever tasted chocolate. I kept a piece, and when Amsterdam was liberated, I gave it to the first Allied soldier I saw'

Bread from heaven

Dutch survivors thank RAF for World War II drop that saved millions
Britain will be 'run for the wealthy and powerful' if Tories retain power - Labour

How 'the Axe' helped Labour

UK will be 'run for the wealthy and powerful' if Tories retain power
Rare and exclusive video shows the horrific price paid by activists for challenging the rule of jihadist extremists in Syria

The price to be paid for challenging the rule of extremists

A revolution now 'consuming its own children'
Welcome to the world of Megagames

Welcome to the world of Megagames

300 players take part in Watch the Skies! board game in London
'Nymphomaniac' actress reveals what it was really like to star in one of the most explicit films ever

Charlotte Gainsbourg on 'Nymphomaniac'

Starring in one of the most explicit films ever
Robert Fisk in Abu Dhabi: The Emirates' out-of-sight migrant workers helping to build the dream projects of its rulers

Robert Fisk in Abu Dhabi

The Emirates' out-of-sight migrant workers helping to build the dream projects of its rulers
Vince Cable interview: Charging fees for employment tribunals was 'a very bad move'

Vince Cable exclusive interview

Charging fees for employment tribunals was 'a very bad move'
Iwan Rheon interview: Game of Thrones star returns to his Welsh roots to record debut album

Iwan Rheon is returning to his Welsh roots

Rheon is best known for his role as the Bastard of Bolton. It's gruelling playing a sadistic torturer, he tells Craig McLean, but it hasn't stopped him recording an album of Welsh psychedelia
Morne Hardenberg interview: Cameraman for BBC's upcoming show Shark on filming the ocean's most dangerous predator

It's time for my close-up

Meet the man who films great whites for a living
Increasing numbers of homeless people in America keep their mobile phones on the streets

Homeless people keep mobile phones

A homeless person with a smartphone is a common sight in the US. And that's creating a network where the 'hobo' community can share information - and fight stigma - like never before