Voices

The Labour leader has been rightly scorned for music that merely ticked boxes. He could so easily have been a lot less boring…

REVIEWS: CLASSICAL - OAE / Norrington Queen Elizabeth Hall London oooo9

CONTRARY TO myth, the output of J S Bach was never wholly forgotten after his death in 1750. Some of the keyboard music continued to circulate in manuscript; the motets, to be sung in Leipzig, where Mozart heard one. And a belated biography in 1802 sparked new interest. But it was the first performance in a century of the St Matthew Passion, put on in Berlin in 1829 by the 20-year-old Mendelssohn, that really kick-started the great 19th-century Bach revival.

Music: The year's best books reviewed

Symphony for the devil

The compact collection

Constantin Silvestri: The collection

The original VW - perfectly tuned and English

Vaughan Williams by Simon Heffer (Weidenfeld & Nicolson, £12.99)

LSO goes on attack in war of cheap CDs

BRITAIN'S MOST successful orchestra has set up its own record label in a pioneering move designed to capitalise on its best live performances. The London Symphony Orchestra is about to launch the first two CDs in its series, called LSO Live, and hopes to record up to half-a-dozen of its concerts a year.

CLASSICAL Review: From Manchester with love

BARBIROLLI NIGHT BRIDGEWATER HALL MANCHESTER/BBC RADIO 3

Obituary: Clifford Harker

CLIFFORD HARKER took over the console of Bristol Cathedral at a time of great change. Hubert Hunt had ruled the organ loft for most of the first half of this century but his successor, Alwyn Surplice, stayed for just three years before moving to Winchester. Between his appointment in 1949 and his retirement in 1983, Harker held firm to the musical and choral traditions of Bristol's great 12th-century centre of worship creating a force of stability for those who worshipped and sang there.

Arts: A lifetime in miniature

It's a collector's dream, full of autographs by the masters... and it's going under the hammer.

Classical: Exquisite melancholy

PROMS 56 & 57 ROYAL ALBERT HALL/ RADIO 3 LONDON

Classical music : Three Choirs festival

Worcester's Three Choirs Festival is an event with a long and distinguished history: it dates back to the early years of the 18th century, and some of the great names who have been closely linked with it include Handel, Parry, Elgar, Vaughan Williams and Maxwell Davies. This year's programme is typically wide-ranging, starting off tonight with sacred works by Duke Ellington, tomorrow Berlioz's enormous Te Deum, and culminating on Friday with a performance of Verdi's Requiem. Mark Elder conducts Mahler's magnificent Third Symphony on Tuesday, while American conductor Leonard Slatkin (right) leads massed choral forces, soloists and the Philharmonia in Elgar's oratorio The Kingdom. In addition to all these riches there is a carefully chosen series of chamber and instrumental recitals, ensuring that this is one of the most cherished small-scale festivals of the year.

First Night: MacMillan has the spirit but lacks substance

The Proms Royal Albert Hall London

Chopin is out and Orff's in

TWO OF the composers who have hitherto defined popular classical music - Bach and Tchaikovsky - have failed tomake an appearance in a new poll of the nation's favourite classical music.
Latest stories from i100
Career Services

Day In a Page

A
Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 1 May 2015
Fishing for votes with Nigel Farage: The Ukip leader shows how he can work an audience as he casts his line to the disaffected of Grimsby

Fishing is on Nigel Farage's mind

Ukip leader casts a line to the disaffected
Who is bombing whom in the Middle East? It's amazing they don't all hit each other

Who is bombing whom in the Middle East?

Robert Fisk untangles the countries and factions
China's influence on fashion: At the top of the game both creatively and commercially

China's influence on fashion

At the top of the game both creatively and commercially
Lord O’Donnell: Former cabinet secretary on the election and life away from the levers of power

The man known as GOD has a reputation for getting the job done

Lord O'Donnell's three principles of rule
Rainbow shades: It's all bright on the night

Rainbow shades

It's all bright on the night
'It was first time I had ever tasted chocolate. I kept a piece, and when Amsterdam was liberated, I gave it to the first Allied soldier I saw'

Bread from heaven

Dutch survivors thank RAF for World War II drop that saved millions
Britain will be 'run for the wealthy and powerful' if Tories retain power - Labour

How 'the Axe' helped Labour

UK will be 'run for the wealthy and powerful' if Tories retain power
Rare and exclusive video shows the horrific price paid by activists for challenging the rule of jihadist extremists in Syria

The price to be paid for challenging the rule of extremists

A revolution now 'consuming its own children'
Welcome to the world of Megagames

Welcome to the world of Megagames

300 players take part in Watch the Skies! board game in London
'Nymphomaniac' actress reveals what it was really like to star in one of the most explicit films ever

Charlotte Gainsbourg on 'Nymphomaniac'

Starring in one of the most explicit films ever
Robert Fisk in Abu Dhabi: The Emirates' out-of-sight migrant workers helping to build the dream projects of its rulers

Robert Fisk in Abu Dhabi

The Emirates' out-of-sight migrant workers helping to build the dream projects of its rulers
Vince Cable interview: Charging fees for employment tribunals was 'a very bad move'

Vince Cable exclusive interview

Charging fees for employment tribunals was 'a very bad move'
Iwan Rheon interview: Game of Thrones star returns to his Welsh roots to record debut album

Iwan Rheon is returning to his Welsh roots

Rheon is best known for his role as the Bastard of Bolton. It's gruelling playing a sadistic torturer, he tells Craig McLean, but it hasn't stopped him recording an album of Welsh psychedelia
Morne Hardenberg interview: Cameraman for BBC's upcoming show Shark on filming the ocean's most dangerous predator

It's time for my close-up

Meet the man who films great whites for a living
Increasing numbers of homeless people in America keep their mobile phones on the streets

Homeless people keep mobile phones

A homeless person with a smartphone is a common sight in the US. And that's creating a network where the 'hobo' community can share information - and fight stigma - like never before