Voices

The Labour leader has been rightly scorned for music that merely ticked boxes. He could so easily have been a lot less boring…

Classical music: To Jimi with love, Nigel

THE KENNEDY EXPERIENCE ROYAL FESTIVAL HALL LONDON

Classical: On The Air Bayan Northcott

SWITCHING ON Radio 3 in the middle of pieces one fails to recognise can result in piquant moments of truth: surprise at something interesting turning out to be by a composer one thought one loathed or, more unsettling, at something unappealing by a composer one believed that one loved. Tuning in mid-way to Saturday afternoon's Listeners' Choice, I chanced upon the opening bars of what turned out to be a sonata for clarinet and piano in four neatly turned and charmingly melodious movements.

Classical: Twentieth century voice

Roy Henderson, 100 on Sunday, taught Kathleen Ferrier, sang for Delius and at Glyndebourne's first night. By Andrew Green

`I grew up without a dad. So will my sons'

Father's Day is, for many, a time to bond. For PETER THOMPSON it opens wounds he has spent years trying to heal

Obituary: Olwen Price

THE WELSH mezzo-soprano Olwen Price was one of those singers who are invaluable to an opera company. She had a large repertory of character roles (and one or two larger roles) in which she could be relied upon to give an excellent, idiomatic performance, while her voice and style could easily adapt to composers from Mozart to Menotti, from Verdi to Vaughan Williams. Although the greater part of her career was spent with Sadler's Wells Opera, she also sang for the BBC - once assisting the great tenor Beniamino Gigli in a recital - and with Welsh National Opera.

Classical: A little rain on the Parade

It may claim to be a celebration of the best of British music since the War, but will Nicholas Kenyon and George Benjamin's `Endless Parade' series of concerts really do our composers justice? By Bayan Northcott

Obituary: Leonard Hancock

LEONARD HANCOCK was an excellent conductor of opera, but his most valuable work during a long career was done, as it were, backstage in various opera houses, including Covent Garden, where he was on the music staff for several years. During that time he conducted the world premiere of Vaughan Williams's The Pilgrim's Progress.

MUSIC: Me and Previn, we go back years

Andre Previn 70th birthday series

Classical Review: Mr Preview celebrates in style

LSO/ANDRE PREVIN BARBICAN LONDON

Obituary: Ruth Gipps

THE COMPOSER, conductor and teacher Ruth Gipps said she had always found it "difficult to understand young people who don't know what they want to be when they grow up". For Gipps, from a young age, it was music.

Obituary: Bob Auger

IN THE modern recording industry the team divides into the producer, who deals with the performance, and the engineer, who deals with the microphone rig, the recording equipment and its operation, and the venue or studio. Bob Auger was one of the leading British recording engineers and a notable pioneer, both as a freelance, and for the practical application of successive technical developments, including stereo and digital recording. He leaves a distinguished portfolio of several thousand recordings, assessed by one colleague as "most of the interesting recordings from that period".

NEW RELEASES

Rautavaara Cantus Articus, Piano Concerto No 1, Symphony No 3

Music: Enigma and after

In 1898, Edward Elgar was a little-known provincial figure. That soon changed.

Obituary: Harold Noble

HAROLD NOBLE was a prolific composer whose contribution to the choral repertoire was rarely acknowledged during his lifetime. Like Ralph Vaughan Williams, Noble took a particular interest in folk music, arranging songs such as "The Ballad of Semmerwater", "Naples Bay" and "The Road of Evening" for voice and piano accompaniment, while his liturgical music includes a Magnificat, Nunc Dimittis and Te Deum.

Not so much epic as out of this world...

The internationally renowned composer Einojuhani Rautavaara is at last being acclaimed by his fellow Finns.
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