Rufus Wainwright

Cultural Life: Paloma Faith, singer

Music: Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds 'Dig, Lazurus, Dig!!!', Edith Piaf "La Vie en Rose", Billie Holiday "Lady Sings the Blues", Lavern Baker "Voodoo Voodoo", Wynonie Harris 'Greatest Hits', Rufus Wainwright 'Want Two', and Erykah Badu 'Mama's Gun'.

The Diary: Anton Edelmann; Kenwood House; Joana Vasconcelos; Neil

Anton Edelmann, the former Savoy chef whose protégés include the young Giorgio Locatelli, was at Sotheby's in London this week, serving guests and fellow gourmands including Locatelli, Brian Mosimann, Mark Hix and John Williams, a 16th-century recipe for cooking dor-mice. Edelmann tells me he selected a menu based around ancient recipes including one for that Roman delicacy, the humble dormouse. While he did not stay completely true to the original – he used rabbit – he thinks 16th- century recipes can be adapted for contemporary palates. "Dormouse was a delicacy, it wasn't because they could find nothing else to eat. The only reason I stuck it on the menu is because it tickled me. The guests liked it, it tickled them, too." His feast was made to celebrate the sale, Books for Cooks, of a private collection of culinary literature from the 16th century to the present day, compiled by Stanley J Seeger. As well as Apicius Coelieus's mock dormouse dish on Edelmann's menu were canapés from Athenaeus, peaches à la Verenne, and chocolates from a 1644 text.

Rufus Wainwright, Sadler's Wells, London

At the start of the second half of this extraordinary concert, Rufus Wainwright laughingly confessed that he had been "shitting bricks" over his performance in the first half. No wonder. Before the interval he had treated us to a stunning rendition of his new album, All Days Are Nights: Songs for Lulu, presented as a kind of Beckettian monodrama. An official had requested that we did not applaud the separate numbers, that we should hold back until the very end "as the exit is part of the performance". So was the entrance, and then some.

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Jesus Christ, superstar: Still the biggest – and most

Philip Pullman's new novel is the latest creation to court controversy over its depiction of Jesus. Paul Taylor looks at how the artists, from Martin Scorsese to Rufus Wainwright via Monty Python, deal with the subject