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Government are now in discussions over how to remove the rabbit without damaging the statue of the anti-apartheid icon

Dream a little dream

Burne-Jones and Dali delved into the imagery of the unconscious. One of them left something to the imagination. By Tom Lubbock

whereits@.surrealism.

This month the Liverpool Tate begins a major exhibition of the work of Salvador Dali, the artist who did more than any other to popularise Surrealism, but who also debased it through his long, overproductive dotage. The Tate show focuses on his best period, the Thirties. If you want to capture some of the spirit of inquiring irrationality which informed the original movement - all that Cabaret Voltaire tapping-into-the-subconscious business - then visit the Surrealism Server. Here, as the opening page puts it, you can "judge the basis of Surrealism not by what has been and yet remains to be written about the movement, but by what has been done and yet remains to be accomplished using the mecanismes inherent in the Vice of Surrealism".

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PICASSO AT THE LAPIN AGILE WEST YORKSHIRE PLAYHOUSE LEEDS

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Rock Family Trees returns to our television screens tonight, with another batch of pop secret histories. James McNair celebrates the rockumentary series which reminds us that, regardless of pedigree, most bands have had their Spinal Tap moments

EDINBURGH FESTIVAL '98: March of the batty brigade

Forget stand-up. Forget everything you've ever known. The new Surrealists are here.

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Spanish come to bury Lorca, not to praise him

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Design: Design Icons

SALVADOR DALI once took a turn-of-the-century chair and set about dismantling it. He changed its leather seat to chocolate. One of its legs stood in a glass of beer. Another stood upon a Louis XV door knob, making the chair so unstable that it toppled over when anyone approached. He called it the atmospheric chair. "And what does that mean,eh?" he asked. Well you could say it was Salvador Dali making an exhibition of himself yet again. Or you could reflect upon the fact that since the human anatomy doesn't change, there really is little to be done with chairs except play around with them. The Egyptians perfected the chair millennia ago, only they called it a throne. It wasn't until Wassily Kandinsky cycling to Bauhaus hit upon the notion that bike handlebars could lend something to design that the cantilevered chair was designed to kick away chair legs.

Art: Classics from the James gang

Sussex is the place for Surrealism. Andrew Lambirth visits two exhibitions featuring treasures taken from some extraordinary private collections

Theatre review: Love and marriage

The Shoemaker's Wondrous Wife; Don Perlimplin

Items and Icons / neat seats

A chair, says the dictionary, is "a seat with a back on which one person sits, typically having four legs and often having arms". And the rest! Because a chair is far more than merely a utilitarian construct. How much more may be seen from Sarah Columbo's appreciation, just, one of four bijou books in the Design Icons series. Columbo has selected just 28 of the many outrageous and extraordinary chairs to have enjoyed high fashion status this century, each of them a reflection of wider social and economic change, and you can see from the nine featured here how chair design will not sit still.

How to start an art collection

For the price of a second-hand car, you could own a piece of work by the world's greatest artists, says Stephen Goodwin

Fame and shame and Salavador Dali

`Cruel, heartless and corrupt, immersed in his sleazy world' - Salvador Dali's biographer has a low opinion of The Great Masturbator.

Update on ... ... pizza

A survey of recent developments in a subject of general interest

VISUAL ARTS Surrealism and After Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art

As a nation we have always been keen on Surrealism. We like a bit of oddity with our art: not just Dali's melting watches and Magritte's visual puns, but the tougher, more intellectual side of things too. It's no accident that three of the world's greatest collections of Surrealist and Dada art have been assembled in Britain, by Edward James, Roland Penrose and, most recently, by champion golfer turned art collector, Gabrielle Keiller. Hers has just gone on show at the SNGMA in Edinburgh, already home to the Penrose library and archive, and now, thanks to the Keiller bequest, a world-class centre for this sort of art.
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