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Government are now in discussions over how to remove the rabbit without damaging the statue of the anti-apartheid icon

A real scene stealer: Glenn Brown's 'second-hand' art is the subject of a Tate retrospective

A lot of people want to lick or even eat Glenn Brown's paintings. It is a permanent source of puzzlement and wry amusement to the artist because some of those pieces that seem to get the digestive juices flowing most freely are those in which he has gone out of his way to create a "toxic foul smelling lump."

The Complete Guide To: Spanish journeys

Whether you crave a spiritual pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela or prefer to follow in Don Quixote's fictional footsteps, you can find your perfect route

Police seize 81 artworks in raid on Dali auction

Spanish police have seized 81 works of art attributed to the surrealist master Salvador Dali that were on the point of being auctioned.

Warhol’s press pass to the stars

As ‘Interview’ approaches its 40th anniversary, Ian Burrell hears how the magazine famous for its celebrity covers was way ahead of its time

A surreal tale of Banderas and three Salvador Dali movies

Antonio Banderas is in talks about playing the lead role in a forthcoming Salvador Dali biopic, sparking a rivalry between the Spanish actor and another Hollywood giant, Al Pacino, who is playing the surrealist painter in another film.

She's got the looks, he's got the millions. It's the perfect match

'Hello' and 'OK', brace yourselves: hedge-fund manager Arpad Busson is engaged to actress Uma Thurman

Chapman brothers direct film comedy about the art world

Jake and Dinos Chapman found fame at the vanguard of the Young British Artists (YBA) movement, producing controversial works that placed them at the centre of London's arts scene for more than a decade. Now, the enfants terribles of British art are turning to film. The brothers are in the early stages of directing a comedy-drama inspired by the artistic circles in which they move.

Apostle of surrealism has last laugh over €1m auction

André Breton, the apostle of surrealism, would probably have been amused rather than annoyed. Art historians and critics are puzzled and angry.

Nasser Azam: Portrait of the artist

One of the star lots at this year’s ‘Independent’ charity auction was the chance to be interviewed by our very own Deborah Ross. But who’d have imagined the winning bid would come from a handsome financier who’s a talented artist, too? It’s almost too much for a girl to bear!

Paperbacks: Icons of Graphic Design, by Steven Heller & Mirko Ilic

Far more interesting than its title seems to suggest, this book is a thesaurus of visual recycling. A number of double-page spreads carry

Pick of the picture books: Jack Vettriano: Studio Life

A remarkably honest portrait of one of Fife's more popular sons (his prints outsell Van Gogh's, Dali's and anything by his contemporary, Gordon Brown). Jack Vettriano: Studio Life (Pavilion, £25) sees the artist at home, at work and addressing his critics. "I think to have been able to create an iconic image from a £17 manual deserves a wee bit more than scorn," he says of the recent scandal over his "copying" figures from an art manual. In his introduction, friend, fan and co-Fifer Ian Rankin admires the narrative value of Vettriano's paintings, and here we see the story of their creation from beginning to end. It starts with hiring and photographing a model (right). "I don't hide from the fact that I only paint a woman if I find her attractive," he admits, obviously.

Food Of The Week: Check in for the world's hot tables

Fine dining is alive and well in swanky hotels across the globe, as this rash of recent openings proves.

History is made as a Parisian restaurant with British owners gets a Michelin star

The French may call the British "les rosbifs" in an unflattering reference to our unimaginative cooking but, for the first time, a British-owned restaurant in the heart of Paris has been awarded the highest accolade in the culinary world – a Michelin star.

Duma Key, By Stephen King

Even before he was hit by a truck in 1999, being bedridden had frequently been one of the primal fears powering Stephen King's fiction. King has got much creative mileage out of incapacitated characters, from Paul Sheldon hobbled and trapped in bed by obsessive fan Annie Wilkes in 1987's Misery, Jessie Burlingame left handcuffed to the head board in a solitary cabin in Maine, after her husband suffers a fatal heart attack during an S&M session in 1992's Gerald's Game, to the horrors witnessed by Louis Creed while working for the University of Maine's campus health service in 1983's Pet Sematary. Since his accident, King has relived his personal horror story in a number of novels and television programmes, including Dreamcatcher (2001), Kingdom Hospital (2004) and The Dark Tower VI: Song of Susannah (2004).

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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine