News Hop to it: The penguin parade has been of the daily highlights at Edinburgh Zoo since the first one happened by accident in 1951

They remain one of its most popular attractions

Royal Shakespeare Company puts 10,000 costumes on sale

Just as the January sales come to an end – the Royal Shakespeare Company jumps into action with its own bargain basement.

Jamie Oliver cooks up record sales for Pearson

The success of Jamie Oliver's latest cookbook helped drive the blue-chip publisher Pearson, which owns Penguin and The Financial Times, to lift its full-year profit forecasts for the third time since July.

Welcome to the captain's cabin: 'A life on the ocean wave provided inspiration for our family home'

Come up to the roof of the erstwhile pub I bought and renovated with my husband, Olly Hoeben, 11 years ago, and you will see his dream of 50 years made real. Around the flat, decked roof with its expansive views of London, and a sky that seems so close you could touch it, are three timber, glass and lead units, precisely designed to look and feel like ships' cabins. But why cabins at the top of an urban building? The reason is found in Olly's formative teenage years. Aged 15, he went to sea as a trainee able seaman. It was what many working-class lads, growing up in Amsterdam in the poverty-stricken years immediately after the war, did to earn a living.

Correspondence, By Ingeborg Bachmann and Paul Celan, trans. Wieland Hoban

Theirs was an unlikely friendship. Or, as they would later wryly comment, an "exemplary" one. He came from that once vibrant centre of Jewish-German culture, Czernowitz, Bukovina, and had survived a Romanian labour camp; both his parents had been killed in a Nazi death camp in Ukraine. She had grown up in the southernmost province of Austria, Carinthia, in relative cultural isolation, and in conflict with her father's National Socialist beliefs and actions.

Julie Burchill: Living by the seaside is like having all your Christmases come at once

When I was a kid growing up in Bristol, we would go on day-trips to the nearby seaside town of Weston-Super-Mare. It was popularly known as Weston-Super-Mud, as the "sea" (the Bristol Channel) was always miles away, and we would have to trek for what seemed like days across the soggy sand in order to paddle. The donkeys were depressed (no cracks – I was a veritable sylph back then) and there often seemed to be more water falling from the sky than there was in the alleged "sea". Nevertheless, I loved Weston, and as a somewhat unbearable brat, it struck me as a complete and utter outrage that I had to go home at night while less intelligent children than I actually lived there! I remember many a silent train trip back to Bristol shooting my poor parents evils, unable to forgive them for the deadly sin of living in a landlocked city.

Three held after fatal London shooting

Three people were being held by police today after a teenager was shot dead and two youths were stabbed on a London housing estate.

Shane Watson: 'It's shattering. We have got to try and restore some pride'

Watson concedes the urn and shoulders burden of an unwanted place in history

Books of the Year: Teenagers

Harsh reality is balanced by a slew of fantasy tales

Mitchell Johnson leaves England dazed in Perth

Fifteen days ago, Mitchell Johnson looked a lost soul as he sat before the media to explain his omission from the Second Ashes Test in Adelaide. Today, it was England who were struggling to find their bearings after Johnson left them dazed with an explosive spell of pace and swing that means Australia are favourites to win the Third Test here at the WACA.

Lucy Porter: Unendangered species need our love too

I'm just saying...

On a wing and a prayer: British birds under threat

What do the Bittern, the Tree Pipit and the Wood Warbler have in common? They are all British bird species that are under threat. Charlie Elder discovers the stark facts beneath the feathers

James Lawton: Australia's death rattle in Adelaide sounded just like a shift in power

Second Test defeat for Ponting's outclassed side has provoked the sort of countrywide soul-searching usually reserved for the English.

Theatre giants Hall and Gambon honoured at Standard awards

London is lauded as the true home of global drama

Adrift on the Pacific for 50 days – and it was all down to love

Love – fuelled by copious amounts of alcohol – sparked an ill-fated voyage by three teenagers who were rescued last week after drifting for 50 days in the South Pacific.

Little Women, By Louisa May Alcott

Re-reading this 19th-century feminine take on John Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress is a real joy. Successive films of Louisa May Alcott's masterpiece relinquished much of its Christian message, and the pushing of that agenda is probably the book's only flaw. Pleasure in reading about exuberant, tomboyish Jo, will never diminish.

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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Dubrovnik, the Dalmatian Coast & Montenegro
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Lisbon, Oporto and the Douro Valley
Lake Garda, Venice & Verona
Spain
Prices correct as of 23 January 2015
Syria crisis: Celebrities call on David Cameron to take more refugees as one young mother tells of torture by Assad regime

Celebrities call on David Cameron to take more Syrian refugees

One young mother tells of torture by Assad regime
The enemy within: People who hear voices in their heads are being encouraged to talk back – with promising results

The enemy within

People who hear voices in their heads are being encouraged to talk back
'In Auschwitz you got used to anything'

'In Auschwitz you got used to anything'

Survivors of the Nazi concentration camp remember its horror, 70 years on
Autumn/winter menswear 2015: The uniforms that make up modern life come to the fore

Autumn/winter menswear 2015

The uniforms that make up modern life come to the fore
'I'm gay, and plan to fight military homophobia'

'I'm gay, and plan to fight military homophobia'

Army general planning to come out
Iraq invasion 2003: The bloody warnings six wise men gave to Tony Blair as he prepared to launch poorly planned campaign

What the six wise men told Tony Blair

Months before the invasion of Iraq in 2003, experts sought to warn the PM about his plans. Here, four of them recall that day
25 years of The Independent on Sunday: The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century

25 years of The Independent on Sunday

The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century
Homeless Veterans appeal: 'Really caring is a dangerous emotion in this kind of work'

Homeless Veterans appeal

As head of The Soldiers' Charity, Martin Rutledge has to temper compassion with realism. He tells Chris Green how his Army career prepared him
Wu-Tang Clan and The Sexual Objects offer fans a chance to own the only copies of their latest albums

Smash hit go under the hammer

It's nice to pick up a new record once in a while, but the purchasers of two latest releases can go a step further - by buying the only copy
Geeks who rocked the world: Documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry

The geeks who rocked the world

A new documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry
Belle & Sebastian interview: Stuart Murdoch reveals how the band is taking a new direction

Belle & Sebastian is taking a new direction

Twenty years ago, Belle & Sebastian was a fey indie band from Glasgow. It still is – except today, as prime mover Stuart Murdoch admits, it has a global cult following, from Hollywood to South Korea
America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

These days in the US things are pretty much stuck where they are, both in politics and society at large, says Rupert Cornwell
A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A veteran of the Fifties campaigns is inspiring a new generation of activists
Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

A C Benson called him 'a horrid little fellow', George Orwell would have shot him, but what a giant he seems now, says DJ Taylor
Growing mussels: Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project

Growing mussels

Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project