News Hop to it: The penguin parade has been of the daily highlights at Edinburgh Zoo since the first one happened by accident in 1951

They remain one of its most popular attractions

Jamie Oliver cooks up record sales for Pearson

The success of Jamie Oliver's latest cookbook helped drive the blue-chip publisher Pearson, which owns Penguin and The Financial Times, to lift its full-year profit forecasts for the third time since July.

Welcome to the captain's cabin: 'A life on the ocean wave provided inspiration for our family home'

Come up to the roof of the erstwhile pub I bought and renovated with my husband, Olly Hoeben, 11 years ago, and you will see his dream of 50 years made real. Around the flat, decked roof with its expansive views of London, and a sky that seems so close you could touch it, are three timber, glass and lead units, precisely designed to look and feel like ships' cabins. But why cabins at the top of an urban building? The reason is found in Olly's formative teenage years. Aged 15, he went to sea as a trainee able seaman. It was what many working-class lads, growing up in Amsterdam in the poverty-stricken years immediately after the war, did to earn a living.

Correspondence, By Ingeborg Bachmann and Paul Celan, trans. Wieland Hoban

Theirs was an unlikely friendship. Or, as they would later wryly comment, an "exemplary" one. He came from that once vibrant centre of Jewish-German culture, Czernowitz, Bukovina, and had survived a Romanian labour camp; both his parents had been killed in a Nazi death camp in Ukraine. She had grown up in the southernmost province of Austria, Carinthia, in relative cultural isolation, and in conflict with her father's National Socialist beliefs and actions.

Julie Burchill: Living by the seaside is like having all your Christmases come at once

When I was a kid growing up in Bristol, we would go on day-trips to the nearby seaside town of Weston-Super-Mare. It was popularly known as Weston-Super-Mud, as the "sea" (the Bristol Channel) was always miles away, and we would have to trek for what seemed like days across the soggy sand in order to paddle. The donkeys were depressed (no cracks – I was a veritable sylph back then) and there often seemed to be more water falling from the sky than there was in the alleged "sea". Nevertheless, I loved Weston, and as a somewhat unbearable brat, it struck me as a complete and utter outrage that I had to go home at night while less intelligent children than I actually lived there! I remember many a silent train trip back to Bristol shooting my poor parents evils, unable to forgive them for the deadly sin of living in a landlocked city.

Three held after fatal London shooting

Three people were being held by police today after a teenager was shot dead and two youths were stabbed on a London housing estate.

Shane Watson: 'It's shattering. We have got to try and restore some pride'

Watson concedes the urn and shoulders burden of an unwanted place in history

Books of the Year: Teenagers

Harsh reality is balanced by a slew of fantasy tales

Mitchell Johnson leaves England dazed in Perth

Fifteen days ago, Mitchell Johnson looked a lost soul as he sat before the media to explain his omission from the Second Ashes Test in Adelaide. Today, it was England who were struggling to find their bearings after Johnson left them dazed with an explosive spell of pace and swing that means Australia are favourites to win the Third Test here at the WACA.

Lucy Porter: Unendangered species need our love too

I'm just saying...

On a wing and a prayer: British birds under threat

What do the Bittern, the Tree Pipit and the Wood Warbler have in common? They are all British bird species that are under threat. Charlie Elder discovers the stark facts beneath the feathers

James Lawton: Australia's death rattle in Adelaide sounded just like a shift in power

Second Test defeat for Ponting's outclassed side has provoked the sort of countrywide soul-searching usually reserved for the English.

Adrift on the Pacific for 50 days – and it was all down to love

Love – fuelled by copious amounts of alcohol – sparked an ill-fated voyage by three teenagers who were rescued last week after drifting for 50 days in the South Pacific.

Theatre giants Hall and Gambon honoured at Standard awards

London is lauded as the true home of global drama

Outside the Box: Malouda has faith in Ancelotti to keep calm and carry on

As the Dalai Lama (@DalaiLama) tweeted only on Friday, "A calm mind helps our human intelligence to assess the situation realistically." Whether anyone at Chelsea is among his one million Twitter followers we can only guess, but "trust" and "calm" are the watchwords in the dressing-room to help steer the club through troubled waters, according to the amiable French midfielder Florent Malouda. Three defeats without scoring in the last four League games, plus the sudden sacking of the popular assistant coach Ray Wilkins, have made Chelsea a suitable case for "crisis" treatment ahead of today's game at Newcastle. But Malouda insists that Carlo Ancelotti is well-equipped to ride the storm. "There's a lot of comments around the team, around the manager, but we stay very calm," he said. "We really trust the manager, he's working very well. He stays really calm and that's experience. He brings calm into the dressing-room. With him we feel the trust – he trusts his players, he gives us the tools to play well." Just a shame they've downed tools quite so often recently.

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Prices correct as of 17 April 2015
NHS struggling to monitor the safety and efficacy of its services outsourced to private providers

Who's monitoring the outsourced NHS services?

A report finds that private firms are not being properly assessed for their quality of care
Zac Goldsmith: 'I'll trigger a by-election over Heathrow'

Zac Goldsmith: 'I'll trigger a by-election over Heathrow'

The Tory MP said he did not want to stand again unless his party's manifesto ruled out a third runway. But he's doing so. Watch this space
How do Greek voters feel about Syriza's backtracking on its anti-austerity pledge?

How do Greeks feel about Syriza?

Five voters from different backgrounds tell us what they expect from Syriza's charismatic leader Alexis Tsipras
From Iraq to Libya and Syria: The wars that come back to haunt us

The wars that come back to haunt us

David Cameron should not escape blame for his role in conflicts that are still raging, argues Patrick Cockburn
Sam Baker and Lauren Laverne: Too busy to surf? Head to The Pool

Too busy to surf? Head to The Pool

A new website is trying to declutter the internet to help busy women. Holly Williams meets the founders
Heston Blumenthal to cook up a spice odyssey for British astronaut manning the International Space Station

UK's Major Tum to blast off on a spice odyssey

Nothing but the best for British astronaut as chef Heston Blumenthal cooks up his rations
John Harrison's 'longitude' clock sets new record - 300 years on

‘Longitude’ clock sets new record - 300 years on

Greenwich horologists celebrate as it keeps to within a second of real time over a 100-day test
Fears in the US of being outgunned in the vital propaganda wars by Russia, China - and even Isis - have prompted a rethink on overseas broadcasters

Let the propaganda wars begin - again

'Accurate, objective, comprehensive': that was Voice of America's creed, but now its masters want it to promote US policy, reports Rupert Cornwell
Why Japan's incredible long-distance runners will never win the London Marathon

Japan's incredible long-distance runners

Every year, Japanese long-distance runners post some of the world's fastest times – yet, come next weekend, not a single elite competitor from the country will be at the London Marathon
Why does Tom Drury remain the greatest writer you've never heard of?

Tom Drury: The quiet American

His debut was considered one of the finest novels of the past 50 years, and he is every bit the equal of his contemporaries, Jonathan Franzen, Dave Eggers and David Foster Wallace
You should judge a person by how they peel a potato

You should judge a person by how they peel a potato

Dave Hax's domestic tips are reminiscent of George Orwell's tea routine. The world might need revolution, but we like to sweat the small stuff, says DJ Taylor
Beige is back: The drab car colours of the 1970s are proving popular again

Beige to the future

Flares and flounce are back on catwalks but a revival in ’70s car paintjobs was a stack-heeled step too far – until now
Bill Granger recipes: Our chef's dishes highlight the delicate essence of fresh cheeses

Bill Granger cooks with fresh cheeses

More delicate on the palate, milder, fresh cheeses can also be kinder to the waistline
Aston Villa vs Liverpool: 'This FA Cup run has been wonderful,' says veteran Shay Given

Shay Given: 'This FA Cup run has been wonderful'

The Villa keeper has been overlooked for a long time and has unhappy memories of the national stadium – but he is savouring his chance to play at Wembley
Timeless drama of Championship race in league of its own - Michael Calvin

Michael Calvin's Last Word

Timeless drama of Championship race in league of its own