News 'Take two aspirin': Horsley, right, with Leonard Rossiter as Reginald Perrin

A gentleman player assured at both touching sincerity and twinkling comedy, John Horsley was a charming actor with plenty of strings to his bow, who played an adroit second fiddle throughout his 60-year career. A household face on television, he will best be remembered as Doc Morrissey, the quack severely in need of a doctor in The Fall and Rise of Reginald Perrin (1975), who showed enthusiasm for his work only when faced with secretaries who were feeling a touch chesty, and who prescribed "two aspirin" for anything and everything.

Vincent Fean, the British Consulate General, with Palestinian Paralympic athletes in Jerusalem

Paralympic athletes make it to Jerusalem thanks to the British

The Palestinian athletics coach Mousa Qadoum was so overcome by emotion on entering the al-Aqsa mosque yesterday that he collapsed into silent tears. It was a reminder of how rare it is for Gazans make it out of the territory to what for Muslims is easily the most sacred site in the Holy Land, a mere 48 miles away.

Amol Rajan: We are on the verge of a great migration from cities

Lovely, lush, liveable Lincolnshire, in which I spent a chunk of the Bank Holiday weekend, is where I suspect most of my generation will end up. There and other places – Kent, Surrey, Cambridge, Oxford, Buckingham – that are within commuting distance of London, where our jobs will be, but not in the city proper. Hampshire, not Hampstead, will be where we raise families and make homes. That's because soon the only people who will be able to afford homes in London will be Bob Diamond, X-Factor contestants, and the Queen.

In demand: Rupert Friend

'The only way to act is to be the person'

Several films and a high-profile romance shot Rupert Friend into the spotlight. These days, back on the London stage, he prefers a quieter life, he tells Charlotte Cripps

Hospital staff carry the coffin of Red Cross worker Khalil Dale to an ambulance in Quetta, Pakistan, yesterday

Aid worker's killers threaten to release video of his execution

Red Cross appeals to Pakistan media not to broadcast Taliban film of Khalil Dale's death

Protesters gather round UN observers during a visit to Douma, a suburb of Damascus, on Monday

Assad tanks punish protesters after UN team drives out

As the UN team drove out of the Damascus suburb of Douma yesterday, regime tanks were said to have rolled in – offering another indication that President Bashar al-Assad is adopting a strategy of brutal mass punishment for those who turn out to show observers their discontent with the regime.

Invisible Ink: No 120, Elizabeth Jenkins

To modern readers, many 1930s writers might as well be using Shakespearian English, such is the grace and complexity of their language. Is this why Elizabeth Jenkins has disappeared from bookshops?

BBC staff in Salford offered security escorts after shooting

Personal-security escorts are being offered to BBC staff struggling to adjust to life at their new headquarters at Salford after an air rifle was shot at an employee as he cycled home.

Ohuruogu: 'I prefer to be in the background and let my work speak for me'

Camera-shy Ohuruogu off to train in Hollywood country

Cathy Freeman flew across the other side of the world to prepare for the 400m at a home Olympics – to train with Donna Fraser at Eton. Christine Ohuruogu has only gone to Los Angeles, and as part of a British training squad (Freeman's was a solo mission). Still, the East End girl who struck gold in the one lap event in Beijing in 2008, would rather like to sneak under the radar ahead of the London Olympics if at all possible.

Alison Steadman: 'A gang of lads saw me and shouted "Pamela!" It really gave me a thrill'

I was proud to be involved in the first lesbian kiss on TV It was in 1974 in a BBC play called Girl, with Myra Frances, and it got a lot of reaction at the time. Then, when Brookside came on years later, people said "Ooh, Anna Friel did this kiss with another woman, and it was the first time on TV." And I'm like, no, actually it was me!

Forensic detectives look for clues at the flats in Grigny where a woman aged 47 was shot on Thursday

French in fear as new killer on a motorcycle stalks Paris suburbs

Four people are shot dead with the same weapon, but detectives think two gunmen may be involved

One Minute With: Tim Lott, novelist

Where are you now and what can you see?

Merah buried in Toulouse after Algeria rejects body

The Islamist gunman who killed seven people before being shot dead by police was buried in Toulouse yesterday after the city's mayor dropped a refusal to permit the ceremony.

Troops and rebels clash in Syrian capital

Syrian security forces clashed with gunmen in an upscale neighborhood of the capital Damascus that is home to embassies and senior officials in one of the worst confrontations in the tightly-controlled city center in the country's yearlong uprising.

Missing: Claudia Lawrence

A prayer for Claudia, three years on

Peter Lawrence remains hopeful that his daughter is still alive. He says not knowing is 'the worst'

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General Election 2015: ‘We will not sit down with Nicola Sturgeon’, says Ed Balls

'We will not sit down with Nicola Sturgeon'

In an exclusive interview, Ed Balls says he won't negotiate his first Budget with SNP MPs - even if Labour need their votes to secure its passage
VE Day 70th anniversary: How ordinary Britons celebrated the end of war in Europe

How ordinary Britons celebrated VE Day

Our perception of VE Day usually involves crowds of giddy Britons casting off the shackles of war with gay abandon. The truth was more nuanced
They came in with William Caxton's printing press, but typefaces still matter in the digital age

Typefaces still matter in the digital age

A new typeface once took years to create, now thousands are available at the click of a drop-down menu. So why do most of us still rely on the old classics, asks Meg Carter?
Discovery of 'missing link' between the two main life-forms on Earth could explain evolution of animals, say scientists

'Missing link' between Earth's two life-forms found

New microbial species tells us something about our dark past, say scientists
The Pan Am Experience is a 'flight' back to the 1970s that never takes off - at least, not literally

Pan Am Experience: A 'flight' back to the 70s

Tim Walker checks in and checks out a four-hour journey with a difference
Humans aren't alone in indulging in politics - it's everywhere in the animal world

Humans aren't alone in indulging in politics

Voting, mutual back-scratching, coups and charismatic leaders - it's everywhere in the animal world
Crisp sales are in decline - but this tasty trivia might tempt back the turncoats

Crisp sales are in decline

As a nation we're filling up on popcorn and pitta chips and forsaking their potato-based predecessors
Ronald McDonald the muse? Why Banksy, Ron English and Keith Coventry are lovin' Maccy D's

Ronald McDonald the muse

A new wave of artists is taking inspiration from the fast food chain
13 best picnic blankets

13 best picnic blankets

Dine al fresco without the grass stains and damp bottoms with something from our pick of picnic rugs
Barcelona 3 Bayern Munich 0 player ratings: Lionel Messi scores twice - but does he score highest in our ratings?

Barcelona vs Bayern Munich player ratings

Lionel Messi scores twice - but does he score highest in our ratings?
Martin Guptill: Explosive New Zealand batsman who sets the range for Kiwis' big guns

Explosive batsman who sets the range for Kiwis' big guns

Martin Guptill has smashed early runs for Derbyshire and tells Richard Edwards to expect more from the 'freakish' Brendon McCullum and his buoyant team during their tour of England
General Election 2015: Ed Miliband's unlikely journey from hapless geek to heart-throb

Miliband's unlikely journey from hapless geek to heart-throb

He was meant to be Labour's biggest handicap - but has become almost an asset
General Election 2015: A guide to the smaller parties, from the the National Health Action Party to the Church of the Militant Elvis Party

On the margins

From Militant Elvis to Women's Equality: a guide to the underdogs standing in the election
Amr Darrag: Ex-Muslim Brotherhood minister in exile still believes Egypt's military regime can be replaced with 'moderate' Islamic rule

'This is the battle of young Egypt for the future of our country'

Ex-Muslim Brotherhood minister Amr Darrag still believes the opposition can rid Egypt of its military regime and replace it with 'moderate' Islamic rule, he tells Robert Fisk
Why patients must rely less on doctors: Improving our own health is the 'blockbuster drug of the century'

Why patients must rely less on doctors

Improving our own health is the 'blockbuster drug of the century'