News 'Take two aspirin': Horsley, right, with Leonard Rossiter as Reginald Perrin

A gentleman player assured at both touching sincerity and twinkling comedy, John Horsley was a charming actor with plenty of strings to his bow, who played an adroit second fiddle throughout his 60-year career. A household face on television, he will best be remembered as Doc Morrissey, the quack severely in need of a doctor in The Fall and Rise of Reginald Perrin (1975), who showed enthusiasm for his work only when faced with secretaries who were feeling a touch chesty, and who prescribed "two aspirin" for anything and everything.

I’m Your Man: The Life of Leonard Cohen, By Sylvie Simmons

'Hallelujah', let real-life Len bewitch you

Toilet humour: David Sedaris

The Week In Radio: A flush of joy from painfully funny family portraits

Is it acceptable to talk on the phone when you're sitting on the toilet? The American humourist David Sedaris says not, though his sister Tiffany would beg to differ. "Don't mind me," she has been known to say, with the strained tone of someone engaging in heavy lifting, while clasping the phone to her ear. "I'm just… trying to get… the lid… off this… jar."

Mike Tyson, Riddick Bowe and about 12,000 New Yorkers stood and applauded the ring walk of local fighter Danny Jacobs at the brand new Barclays Centre, Brooklyn, on Saturday night

Bunce on Boxing: Jacobs joy in first bout back after winning his fight with cancer

"I pushed myself to the gym, to limp, then walk, then start fighting again," says Jacobs

Invisible Ink: No 146 - Barry Pain

We tend to think of the late Victorians as a patrician, humourless lot, but a sprightly sense of fun emerges from some, and this is best exemplified by Pain's comic stories. Born and educated in Cambridge, this son of a linen draper emerged into a world where everyone was sure of their place. Adept at parody, verse and light humour, Pain became a journalist and contributor to Punch magazine. His first novels are hard to find, or even read about, and sound dull, with titles such as In a Canadian Canoe, and Graeme and Cyril.

A view of the Bangkok skyline

Thailand government claims to have struck deal to host Bangkok Grand Prix in 2014

Thailand's government sports authority says it has struck an in-principle deal to host a Formula One race in Bangkok in 2014, with negotiations ongoing about the hosting fee, according to a report in The Nation newspaper.

A combo shows the Eiffel tower submerging into darkness in Paris as part of the Earth Hour switch-off last year.

Great and the good of Paris implicated in money-laundering scheme built on vast drug profits

Twenty people are held as complex operation is uncovered by police. By John Lichfield

The spiral around the red giant R Sculptoris is probably caused by a hidden companion star

Highest telescope reveals wonders of the Universe

A stunning image of a spiral shell of cosmic dust and gas around a red giant star was captured by astronomers using the world's highest terrestrial telescope.

DVD: In the Dark Half (15)

If there's macramé or anything vaguely knotty in a British film you know it's going to be creepy – this country's foremost genre.

Rory McIlroy walks to the first tee after arriving late

Ryder Cup: Rory McIlroy reunited with policeman who rushed him to Medina's first tee

Ryder Cup hero Rory McIlroy has been reunited with the policeman who rushed him to the course for the final day's play at Medinah Country Club.

Kenyan soldiers on the outskirts of the port city of Kismayu

Troops delay entering Kismayu over fear that rebels set trap

African Union and Somali government troops are in no rush to move deeper into Kismayu, the southern stronghold abandoned by Islamist militants, a military spokesman said yesterday, as anxiety over revenge attacks gripped many in the port city.

Somalia's Al-Shabaab rebels pull out of Kismayu bastion

Somalia's Al-Shabaab rebels withdrew from their last major bastion of Kismayu overnight, the group and residents said, a day after Kenyan and Somali government forces attacked the southern port.

Zone One By Colson Whitehead

A land of opportunity for the living and walking dead

DJ Taylor: Divisive, detached and intolerant

Modern Tories are showing their true colours with campaigns that are a long way from conservatism with a small C

Railway, By George Revill

The oddly singular title is explained when you learn the book is the latest addition to a series called Objekt, which "explores a range of types… that have captured the imagination of modernist designers, makers and theorists". Unlike other titles in the series – Dam, Factory, School, Factory, Chair – Railway has inspired wide affection and a host of cultural responses.

The Barbarian Nurseries, By Hector Tobar

Eye-opening travels across borders with the home help
News
Ben Little, right, is a Labour supporter while Jonathan Rogers supports the Green Party
general election 2015
News
The 91st Hakone Ekiden Qualifier at Showa Kinen Park, Tokyo, 2014
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Life and Style
Former helicopter pilot Major Tim Peake will become the first UK astronaut in space for over 20 years
food + drinkNothing but the best for British astronaut as chef Heston Blumenthal cooks up his rations
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Kim Wilde began gardening in the 1990s when she moved to the countryside
peopleThe singer is leading an appeal for the charity Thrive, which uses the therapy of horticulture
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Alexis Sanchez celebrates scoring a second for Arsenal against Reading
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An easy-peel potato; Dave Hax has come up with an ingenious method in food preparation
voicesDave Hax's domestic tips are reminiscent of George Orwell's tea routine. The world might need revolution, but we like to sweat the small stuff, says DJ Taylor
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Japan's population is projected to fall dramatically in the next 50 years (Wikimedia)
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Buyers of secondhand cars are searching out shades last seen in cop show ‘The Sweeney’
motoringFlares and flounce are back on catwalks but a revival in ’70s car paintjobs was a stack-heeled step too far – until now
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Prices correct as of 17 April 2015
NHS struggling to monitor the safety and efficacy of its services outsourced to private providers

Who's monitoring the outsourced NHS services?

A report finds that private firms are not being properly assessed for their quality of care
Zac Goldsmith: 'I'll trigger a by-election over Heathrow'

Zac Goldsmith: 'I'll trigger a by-election over Heathrow'

The Tory MP said he did not want to stand again unless his party's manifesto ruled out a third runway. But he's doing so. Watch this space
How do Greek voters feel about Syriza's backtracking on its anti-austerity pledge?

How do Greeks feel about Syriza?

Five voters from different backgrounds tell us what they expect from Syriza's charismatic leader Alexis Tsipras
From Iraq to Libya and Syria: The wars that come back to haunt us

The wars that come back to haunt us

David Cameron should not escape blame for his role in conflicts that are still raging, argues Patrick Cockburn
Sam Baker and Lauren Laverne: Too busy to surf? Head to The Pool

Too busy to surf? Head to The Pool

A new website is trying to declutter the internet to help busy women. Holly Williams meets the founders
Heston Blumenthal to cook up a spice odyssey for British astronaut manning the International Space Station

UK's Major Tum to blast off on a spice odyssey

Nothing but the best for British astronaut as chef Heston Blumenthal cooks up his rations
John Harrison's 'longitude' clock sets new record - 300 years on

‘Longitude’ clock sets new record - 300 years on

Greenwich horologists celebrate as it keeps to within a second of real time over a 100-day test
Fears in the US of being outgunned in the vital propaganda wars by Russia, China - and even Isis - have prompted a rethink on overseas broadcasters

Let the propaganda wars begin - again

'Accurate, objective, comprehensive': that was Voice of America's creed, but now its masters want it to promote US policy, reports Rupert Cornwell
Why Japan's incredible long-distance runners will never win the London Marathon

Japan's incredible long-distance runners

Every year, Japanese long-distance runners post some of the world's fastest times – yet, come next weekend, not a single elite competitor from the country will be at the London Marathon
Why does Tom Drury remain the greatest writer you've never heard of?

Tom Drury: The quiet American

His debut was considered one of the finest novels of the past 50 years, and he is every bit the equal of his contemporaries, Jonathan Franzen, Dave Eggers and David Foster Wallace
You should judge a person by how they peel a potato

You should judge a person by how they peel a potato

Dave Hax's domestic tips are reminiscent of George Orwell's tea routine. The world might need revolution, but we like to sweat the small stuff, says DJ Taylor
Beige is back: The drab car colours of the 1970s are proving popular again

Beige to the future

Flares and flounce are back on catwalks but a revival in ’70s car paintjobs was a stack-heeled step too far – until now
Bill Granger recipes: Our chef's dishes highlight the delicate essence of fresh cheeses

Bill Granger cooks with fresh cheeses

More delicate on the palate, milder, fresh cheeses can also be kinder to the waistline
Aston Villa vs Liverpool: 'This FA Cup run has been wonderful,' says veteran Shay Given

Shay Given: 'This FA Cup run has been wonderful'

The Villa keeper has been overlooked for a long time and has unhappy memories of the national stadium – but he is savouring his chance to play at Wembley
Timeless drama of Championship race in league of its own - Michael Calvin

Michael Calvin's Last Word

Timeless drama of Championship race in league of its own