Extras

Here are the answers to this week's quiz...

The worst kind of whinge

also showing SWIMMING WITH SHARKS George Huang (15) NADJA Michael Almereyda (15 ) NORTH BY NORTHWEST Alfred Hitchcock (PG)

ARTS EXHIBITIONS: The eye of the beholder

Two new shows marking the centenary of British cinema explore the links between artists and film-makers. Kevin Jackson reports

A reel nightmare

Kafka's influence on trial at the NFT

The strange allure of the Middle Ages

Beware the new vogue for medievalism. The modern world hasn't been all bad, writes Blake Morrison

Cut and print: tales of the celluloid city

Merseyside has blazed a trail in attracting film-makers seeking a convenient lookalike for Moscow, Dublin, London, even New York. Now other councils have stars in their eyes. Ryan Gilbey reports

Time bandits

Time bandits

Men in grey suits can be funny, too

CHARTERED accountants are fighting back. After years of being scorned by the Monty Python generation, they are returning fire with the Pythons' own weapon - humour.

Pythonesque on top pay

ONE SENIOR City figure I lunched with last week was baffled by the latest effort to restore public confidence in the setting of top pay. "It's like something out of Monty Python,'' he said. Three of the four industrialists on the CBI-inspired comm ittee are on more than £600,000. The fourth has seen such a pay packet in the past.

Still having us in stitches after all these years

I'm looking forward to John Cleese's magisterial history of psychoanalysis, myself. Not commissioned yet, at least not as far as I know, but having watched Terry Gilliam tackle the early history of cinema on Saturday and Terry Jones take on the C rusades(BBC2) last night, you wonder if it can be far off. In fact, now I think of it, the series is shamefully overdue: one of the most influential intellectual movements of the century and John Cleese on hand to play the Rat Man, if things threaten to get a little stodgy. Shouldn't be any problem in whipping up American co-production money, either. Six parts, Spring 1996 please.

Review:Down will come cradle and nanny and all

This hasn't been a good week for those thinking of hiring a nanny. First, Devil's Advocate (BBC1) raised the possibility that your little darlings might be flambeed by a witch (never mind that she wasn't a witch and nobody got flambeed anyway; th e guilty parent is given to dire imaginings). Then, just as you were calming down, Tears before Bedtime (BBC2) turns up, a grimly watchable lampoon on the agonies of the career couple.

What came of the odd Python out?

Twenty-five years after the Flying Circus took British humour into a ne w orbit, James Rampton meets Carol `cleavage' Cleveland, femme fatale of the act

REVIEW / Some handy hints for the Python charmer

'YOU WILL be brutally honest with the copy?' Michael Palin said to his editor in Palin's Column (C4). Well, all right, since you asked. It's great, honestly. I just have a few tiny suggestions. First of all the writing needs a bit more work, it's not really had that final polish has it?

FILM / Wayne's worlds apart: Adam Mars-Jones on American juvenilia and French coming-of-age, Wayne's World 2 and Les Visiteurs

Being brainless in a sophisticated way may not be the only secret of making people laugh. But it's done no harm to Mike Myers, originator of the Wayne's World comedy franchise, now opening its second outlet with Wayne's World 2 (PG), directed by first-timer Stephen Surjik. The two heroes, still nominally teenagers, sleep in their baseball caps; one of them, offered an Old Fashion by a scheming seductress, spits it out, saying: 'This Coke's gone bad.' Their innocence defends them.

FILM / The man you hate to love?: Pauline Kael called him a 'benevolent eunuch', other critics say his balls are all in one court. Sexless? Predictable? Can they mean that funny man Robin Williams? Interview by Sheila Johnston

The earthquake]' (my neighbour in the crowded press room has had an epiphany), 'There's been no major Hollywood star in London since the earthquake] I'll ask him about that.' Robin Williams is in town and the hack pack is in full cry. Because Williams, we all know, is a master- interviewee: famed for turning routine plugging exercises into virtuoso impro sessions, delivered in a babel of voices and personae. Bootleg tapes are said to sell for tidy sums. And his cuttings show him prepared to answer questions from the banal to the impertinent with unfailing courtesy and a sometimes damaging candour.

TELEVISION / BRIEFING: Animated discussions

The animator Bob Godfrey does not work on Schwarzenegger- sized budgets; in fact, as one of his collaborators puts it, 'a shoestring would be a luxury.' Nevertheless, as Bob Godfrey - A Life in Shorts shows, he thrives on adversity, cheerfully cutting and pasting from the most unlikely sources (an Abyssinian fire-eater, The Third Man), and apparently furnishing his shambolic Soho office entirely from skips. This illuminating profile for FOUR- MATIONS: ASPECTS OF COMEDY (9pm C4) examines the playful mind behind not only the children's classics Roobarb and Henry's Cat, but also the first British cartoons to be awarded an X certificate. Godfrey has been responsible for some of the best of British comedy over the past three decades, working with the Goons and Terry Gilliam (the scene in Godfrey's Revolution where a piano lid is slammed on Beethoven's fingers is pure Python). And in 1974 he won an Oscar for Great (shown last Sunday). Godfrey's work is testament to the creativity that can spring from chaos. But it takes its toll; one of his editors suggests that many people who go to Godfrey's office might be better off visiting the neurological hospital next- door.
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