The Hives

The Hives: Suited, booted, top-hatted and ready to rock

The Hives' fifth album has been five years in the making. It's the time it takes to make a classic, the natty rockers tell Gillian Orr

Beatles top best-selling singles chart

The Beatles have held off artist such as Elvis Presley and Madonna to be declared the biggest selling singles act since charts began 60 years ago.

Observations: Outdoor performers to use their own shell-likes

Jason Flanagan, one-time employee of Norman Foster, and who is now a director of BFLS Architects, has just rolled out the prototype of Soundforms, a sophisticated, shell-like, soundstage, whose components can be set up in a few hours.

Follow the lieder: Franz Schubert

The Week In Radio: Schubert shows it's easy to become hooked on classics

So, Schubert. He's inescapable, or at least he is on Radio 3. If you're not an admirer but a regular listener, you'll either have to decamp to Classic FM or seek refuge in silence which is, of course, unthinkable. I can't claim to be an authority on the composer since my knowledge of classical music can pretty much be summed up in Music for Babies, a CD that someone who didn't know me too well gave me when I was pregnant after it was claimed that exposure to classical music would increase my child's IQ. (To what extent it succeeded isn't clear). Pretty much all I know about Schubert is that he's the greatest songwriter since The Beatles. Hang on, that doesn't sound right....

Barack Obama performing 'Sweet Home Chicago' on Tuesday night

Politicians: Sing when you're winning... or not

Who knew Barack Obama could be a one-man stimulus package for a beleaguered music industry? When the US President belted out a couple of lines of Al Green's "Let's Stay Together" at a fundraiser last month, sales of the track soared by almost 500 per cent. Now the blues classic "Sweet Home Chicago" can expect a boost after Obama confirmed his singing chops with an impromptu performance at the White House.

Decca’s Dick Rowe, left, turned down the Beatles

The man who rejected the Beatles

Exactly 50 years ago, Decca's Dick Rowe turned down the Fab Four, so heading an unenviable club of talent-spotters who passed up their biggest chance. But is it all an urban myth? A new book suggests so

Jagger: 'I find myself being used as a political football'

Jagger: I'm not under Cameron's thumb

Stone pulls out of PM's Davos tea party saying he's fed up of being used as a political football

Lively made a dame for services to literature

New Year Honours: The Arts

The magical mystery tourist: George Harriso

Music: Hearing secret harmonies

On the rock front, a number of the year's music titles will please children of the Sixties. George Harrison: Living in the Material World (Abrams, £26.99) is a lavish volume, tying in with Martin Scorsese's documentary, that every Beatle fan will covet. With many of Harrison's own photos, it reflects his wide-ranging interests. As his widow writes, "everything was important to him but nothing really mattered".

Not Fade Away: Rolling Stones photos found after 40 years

Previously unpublished images from a 1970 studio photo shoot by Peter Webb are going on show after being lost in an attic for 40 years. Matilda Battersby talks to the photographer

Caught & Social: Double joy for Ronnie Wood

Ronnie Wood’s night at the Arqiva Commercial Radio Awards was better than he realised.

Why the best rock docs bend the truth

The new Kings of Leon documentary is both strange and true. But, says Simon Hardeman, the best rock movies, from The Beatles to Bob Dylan, often play fast and loose with the facts

Todd Lynn: Tailor-made rock'n'roll

Designer Todd Lynn has dressed U2 and Marilyn Manson, but he's branching out with a show next week at Ascot. He tells Harriet Walker why he's having a flutter on some new customers

Album: Barry Green, Dave Green, Turn Left at Monday (Moletone)

Impossible to dislike, bare bones piano and double bass duo by the unrelated Greens.

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