News The judge said the family of Fusilier Lee Rigby had shown ‘great dignity’ during the trial

Lee Rigby survived a tour of Afghanistan which left seven of his comrades dead before he returned to what his family believed was the comparative safety of London.

Dance on film adopts a challenging posture

It's been an unusually fatuous week on television, both in drama and current affairs, which may be why Dance for the Camera (BBC2, all week) feels like relief rather than obligation. The Radio Times described it as "a journey along pathways real a nd imaginary", which under normal circumstances would have me getting out the map to look for an alternative route. In fact the series has been full of little shocks of pleasure, precisely because it gives precedence to bodily impulse over rational clari ty.

Lottery sells 7 million dreams in a day

The launch of the National Lottery yesterday was hailed as an outstanding success after 7 million tickets - understood to be more than double the expected number - were bought around Britain in 12 hours.

The view from here: Real passengers know how to behave

There have been many letters claiming that I'm not a real bus-driver. Well, who is? I doubt if any of my colleagues expected to end up in this job. It was just something that happened to them. One minute they were ordinary citizens; next . . . whoosh . . . they were bus-drivers. Now there are all these men and women, doomed, like Hamlet's ghost, to drive up and down, in a bus, forever. And I'm one of them.

Happy Anniversary: Brighton breezy

Today:

Site Unseen: A weekly look at London's hidden gems: The Tower Subway

Just 50 yards from where the tourists steadfastly queue for admittance to the Tower of London stands a monument to Victorian engineering excellence.

Civil War 'skirmish' provokes fresh outbreak of hostilities: Oliver Gillie visits a village 'wounded' by loss of battlefield status

THE OFFICIAL classification of a Civil War engagement at Chalgrove in Oxfordshire as a skirmish, rather than a battle, has annoyed local people and others who believe that it was a turning point in English history.

BEST-SELLERS / Top 10 Tourist Attractions 1993

TOP 10 TOURIST ATTRACTIONS 1993

Obituary: John Lord

John Govan Lord, television producer and writer: born Rochdale, Lancashire 7 May 1924; married 1953 Alison Megroz (one son, one daughter; marriage dissolved), 1972 Karolyn Kennedy; died Montclair, New Jersey 18 May 1994.

Navy day

HMS Westminster, the Royal Navy's newest and most advanced Type 23 Duke-class frigate, will be commissioned at a ceremony at the Tower of London on Friday. The 4,000-ton ship, built by troubled Tyneside shipbuilder Swan Hunter last November, has already begun trials.

National treasures 'cost too much'

The cost of visiting London heritage sites is spiralling out of control, according to a report by the Consumers' Association.

Obituary: Col Sir Thomas Butler

Col Sir Thomas Butler, soldier, died 9 April, aged 83. Awarded the DSO for his courage as company commander in the battle of Mareth, 1943. In 1952 he became Assistant Quartermaster General, London District, responsible for the administration and quartering of the troops involved in the Queen's coronation in 1953. A military adviser to the Thai army, in 1959 he headed the defence staff of the High Commissioner of New Zealand. Governor of the Tower of London and Keeper of the Jewel House 1969-71.

The crown jewels go back on display

The Imperial State Crown on display at the new jewel house which opened in the Tower of London yesterday. The exhibition caters for 20,000 visitors a day

Crown jewels are returned to the public spotlight

THE NEW DISPLAY of the Crown jewels opens to the public this afternoon at the Tower of London, writes Oliver Gillie.

Druids take the spring initiative: Horn-player sends message to all corners as he performs an ancient rite beside the Tower of London

THE MIDDLE-AGED man in a white robe turned his back to the midday sun, pointed a three-foot horn like a blunderbuss towards the press photographers scuttling along a flat roof, puffed out his cheeks and blew, an ancient and primitive sound.

A home fit to house our nation's history: Moving the Public Record Office to the London suburbs shows a lack of vision, says David Starkey

T S ELIOT wrote: 'A people without history / Is not redeemed from time.' Eliot, an American who chose to become British because of his attachment to English history, could never have envisaged that his adoptive compatriots would become 'a people without history'. But within a few decades of his death that moment threatens.
Career Services

Day In a Page

Independent Travel
Bruges
Lake Como
Burgundy
South AFrica
Paris
Northern Corsica
Prices correct as of 21 November 2014
In a world of Saudi bullying, right-wing Israeli ministers and the twilight of Obama, Iran is looking like a possible policeman of the Gulf

Iran is shifting from pariah to possible future policeman of the Gulf

Robert Fisk on our crisis with Iran
The young are the new poor: A third of young people pushed into poverty

The young are the new poor

Sharp increase in the number of under-25s living in poverty
Greens on the march: ‘We could be on the edge of something very big’

Greens on the march

‘We could be on the edge of something very big’
Revealed: the case against Bill Cosby - through the stories of his accusers

Revealed: the case against Bill Cosby

Through the stories of his accusers
Why are words like 'mongol' and 'mongoloid' still bandied about as insults?

The Meaning of Mongol

Why are the words 'mongol' and 'mongoloid' still bandied about as insults?
Mau Mau uprising: Kenyans still waiting for justice join class action over Britain's role in the emergency

Kenyans still waiting for justice over Mau Mau uprising

Thousands join class action over Britain's role in the emergency
Isis in Iraq: The trauma of the last six months has overwhelmed the remaining Christians in the country

The last Christians in Iraq

After 2,000 years, a community will try anything – including pretending to convert to Islam – to avoid losing everything, says Patrick Cockburn
Black Friday: Helpful discounts for Christmas shoppers, or cynical marketing by desperate retailers?

Helpful discounts for Christmas shoppers, or cynical marketing by desperate retailers?

Britain braced for Black Friday
Bill Cosby's persona goes from America's dad to date-rape drugs

From America's dad to date-rape drugs

Stories of Bill Cosby's alleged sexual assaults may have circulated widely in Hollywood, but they came as a shock to fans, says Rupert Cornwell
Clare Balding: 'Women's sport is kicking off at last'

Clare Balding: 'Women's sport is kicking off at last'

As fans flock to see England women's Wembley debut against Germany, the TV presenter on an exciting 'sea change'
Oh come, all ye multi-faithful: The Christmas jumper is in fashion, but should you wear your religion on your sleeve?

Oh come, all ye multi-faithful

The Christmas jumper is in fashion, but should you wear your religion on your sleeve?
Dr Charles Heatley: The GP off to do battle in the war against Ebola

The GP off to do battle in the war against Ebola

Dr Charles Heatley on joining the NHS volunteers' team bound for Sierra Leone
Flogging vlogging: First video bloggers conquered YouTube. Now they want us to buy their books

Flogging vlogging

First video bloggers conquered YouTube. Now they want us to buy their books
Saturday Night Live vs The Daily Show: US channels wage comedy star wars

Saturday Night Live vs The Daily Show

US channels wage comedy star wars
When is a wine made in Piedmont not a Piemonte wine? When EU rules make Italian vineyards invisible

When is a wine made in Piedmont not a Piemonte wine?

When EU rules make Italian vineyards invisible