News The judge said the family of Fusilier Lee Rigby had shown ‘great dignity’ during the trial

Lee Rigby survived a tour of Afghanistan which left seven of his comrades dead before he returned to what his family believed was the comparative safety of London.

Dance on film adopts a challenging posture

It's been an unusually fatuous week on television, both in drama and current affairs, which may be why Dance for the Camera (BBC2, all week) feels like relief rather than obligation. The Radio Times described it as "a journey along pathways real a nd imaginary", which under normal circumstances would have me getting out the map to look for an alternative route. In fact the series has been full of little shocks of pleasure, precisely because it gives precedence to bodily impulse over rational clari ty.

Lottery sells 7 million dreams in a day

The launch of the National Lottery yesterday was hailed as an outstanding success after 7 million tickets - understood to be more than double the expected number - were bought around Britain in 12 hours.

The view from here: Real passengers know how to behave

There have been many letters claiming that I'm not a real bus-driver. Well, who is? I doubt if any of my colleagues expected to end up in this job. It was just something that happened to them. One minute they were ordinary citizens; next . . . whoosh . . . they were bus-drivers. Now there are all these men and women, doomed, like Hamlet's ghost, to drive up and down, in a bus, forever. And I'm one of them.

Happy Anniversary: Brighton breezy

Today:

Site Unseen: A weekly look at London's hidden gems: The Tower Subway

Just 50 yards from where the tourists steadfastly queue for admittance to the Tower of London stands a monument to Victorian engineering excellence.

Civil War 'skirmish' provokes fresh outbreak of hostilities: Oliver Gillie visits a village 'wounded' by loss of battlefield status

THE OFFICIAL classification of a Civil War engagement at Chalgrove in Oxfordshire as a skirmish, rather than a battle, has annoyed local people and others who believe that it was a turning point in English history.

BEST-SELLERS / Top 10 Tourist Attractions 1993

TOP 10 TOURIST ATTRACTIONS 1993

Obituary: John Lord

John Govan Lord, television producer and writer: born Rochdale, Lancashire 7 May 1924; married 1953 Alison Megroz (one son, one daughter; marriage dissolved), 1972 Karolyn Kennedy; died Montclair, New Jersey 18 May 1994.

Navy day

HMS Westminster, the Royal Navy's newest and most advanced Type 23 Duke-class frigate, will be commissioned at a ceremony at the Tower of London on Friday. The 4,000-ton ship, built by troubled Tyneside shipbuilder Swan Hunter last November, has already begun trials.

National treasures 'cost too much'

The cost of visiting London heritage sites is spiralling out of control, according to a report by the Consumers' Association.

Obituary: Col Sir Thomas Butler

Col Sir Thomas Butler, soldier, died 9 April, aged 83. Awarded the DSO for his courage as company commander in the battle of Mareth, 1943. In 1952 he became Assistant Quartermaster General, London District, responsible for the administration and quartering of the troops involved in the Queen's coronation in 1953. A military adviser to the Thai army, in 1959 he headed the defence staff of the High Commissioner of New Zealand. Governor of the Tower of London and Keeper of the Jewel House 1969-71.

The crown jewels go back on display

The Imperial State Crown on display at the new jewel house which opened in the Tower of London yesterday. The exhibition caters for 20,000 visitors a day

Crown jewels are returned to the public spotlight

THE NEW DISPLAY of the Crown jewels opens to the public this afternoon at the Tower of London, writes Oliver Gillie.

Druids take the spring initiative: Horn-player sends message to all corners as he performs an ancient rite beside the Tower of London

THE MIDDLE-AGED man in a white robe turned his back to the midday sun, pointed a three-foot horn like a blunderbuss towards the press photographers scuttling along a flat roof, puffed out his cheeks and blew, an ancient and primitive sound.

A home fit to house our nation's history: Moving the Public Record Office to the London suburbs shows a lack of vision, says David Starkey

T S ELIOT wrote: 'A people without history / Is not redeemed from time.' Eliot, an American who chose to become British because of his attachment to English history, could never have envisaged that his adoptive compatriots would become 'a people without history'. But within a few decades of his death that moment threatens.
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Refugee crisis: David Cameron lowered the flag for the dead king of Saudi Arabia - will he do the same honour for little Aylan Kurdi?

Cameron lowered the flag for the dead king of Saudi Arabia...

But will he do the same honour for little Aylan Kurdi, asks Robert Fisk
Our leaders lack courage in this refugee crisis. We are shamed by our European neighbours

Our leaders lack courage in this refugee crisis. We are shamed by our European neighbours

Humanity must be at the heart of politics, says Jeremy Corbyn
Joe Biden's 'tease tour': Could the US Vice-President be testing the water for a presidential run?

Joe Biden's 'tease tour'

Could the US Vice-President be testing the water for a presidential run?
Britain's 24-hour culture: With the 'leisured society' a distant dream we're working longer and less regular hours than ever

Britain's 24-hour culture

With the 'leisured society' a distant dream we're working longer and less regular hours than ever
Diplomacy board game: Treachery is the way to win - which makes it just like the real thing

The addictive nature of Diplomacy

Bullying, betrayal, aggression – it may be just a board game, but the family that plays Diplomacy may never look at each other in the same way again
Lady Chatterley's Lover: Racy underwear for fans of DH Lawrence's equally racy tome

Fashion: Ooh, Lady Chatterley!

Take inspiration from DH Lawrence's racy tome with equally racy underwear
8 best children's clocks

Tick-tock: 8 best children's clocks

Whether you’re teaching them to tell the time or putting the finishing touches to a nursery, there’s a ticker for that
Charlie Austin: Queens Park Rangers striker says ‘If the move is not right, I’m not going’

Charlie Austin: ‘If the move is not right, I’m not going’

After hitting 18 goals in the Premier League last season, the QPR striker was the great non-deal of transfer deadline day. But he says he'd preferred another shot at promotion
Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

How Isis profits from destruction of antiquities

Robert Fisk on the terrorist group's manipulation of the market to increase the price of artefacts
Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

In an exclusive interview, Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea
Tunisia fears its Arab Spring could be reversed as the new regime becomes as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor

The Arab Spring reversed

Tunisian protesters fear that a new law will whitewash corrupt businessmen and officials, but they are finding that the new regime is becoming as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor
King Arthur: Legendary figure was real and lived most of his life in Strathclyde, academic claims

Academic claims King Arthur was real - and reveals where he lived

Dr Andrew Breeze says the legendary figure did exist – but was a general, not a king
Who is Oliver Bonas and how has he captured middle-class hearts?

Who is Oliver Bonas?

It's the first high-street store to pay its staff the living wage, and it saw out the recession in style
Earth has 'lost more than half its trees' since humans first started cutting them down

Axe-wielding Man fells half the world’s trees – leaving us just 422 each

However, the number of trees may be eight times higher than previously thought
60 years of Scalextric: Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones

60 years of Scalextric

Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones