Sport Nadine Angerer alongside Cristiano Ronaldo

The Germany captain may have drawn less attention, but was deserving of her moment in the spotlight

Mary Dejevsky: Oxfam is there to help people – not to dabble in politics

The catastrophic conditions in the Gaza Strip, brought about by Israel's military action against rocket attacks from Hamas, have brought out some of the best in individuals and organisations – as extreme situations so often do.

Mechanical failure theory in 'UFO mystery'

The mysterious severance of a wind turbine blade may have been caused by a mechanical failure, an expert said today.

<i>IoS</i> letters, emails & messages (21 December 2008)

As someone who works with small-scale farmers in Peru, now considered to be one of the countries most vulnerable to climate change, I am saddened to read the recent catalogue of weak progress by rich countries towards tackling it, whether in the UK ("Red tape strangles Whitehall's plans to boost green energy", 14 December), or the recent climate summits in Brussels and Poznan.

Red tape strangles Whitehall's plans to boost green energy

'Dire' bureaucratic delays and foot-dragging dog the PM's aims for more renewable power in the UK

Go-ahead for giant wind farm

One of the biggest offshore wind farms in the world is to be built off the UK coast after being given the go-ahead by the Government, it was announced today.

Close-up: Dale Vince

He wants one million Britons to turn on to his turbines

'Language skills have given me focus and direction'

'I really love the independence this work gives me'

Winds of change: A beacon of optimism

The Government claims Britain is ready for massive investment in wind energy, but the renewable energy sector warns there are big obstacles to overcome. Sarah Arnott reports

Miliband's blueprint for greener homes

The Government has made its target to cut carbon dioxide emissions more ambitious, and the new Energy and Climate Change Secretary is examining incentives to help us meet it, reports Geoffrey Lean

Tate's vision of a London under fire

A futuristic shelter for besieged Londoners inspired by the July 7 bombings and the Blitz was unveiled yesterday as the latest installation to fill Tate Modern's vast Turbine Hall.

Leading article: Rainy days

It takes the Tate Modern, and a French artist, to remind us, just as the markets crash and the recession takes hold, that it's all going to get much worse over the next 50 years. The gallery's latest installation in the much-applauded Turbine Hall of the former power station is a work of the French-born artist, Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster. Not for her the giant slides, the glorious colours or the intriguing contraptions that have previously graced the hall. instead we have a collection of bunk beds scattered and accompanied by the sound of the steady drip of rainwater.

Human Jet's cross-channel bid grounded again

Poor weather conditions today scuppered a Swiss adventurer's record-breaking attempt to become the first person to fly solo across the English Channel using a single jet-propelled wing.

Solar panels 'take 100 years to pay back installation costs'

Solar panels are one of the least cost-effective ways of combating climate change and will take 100 years to pay back their installation costs, the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (Rics) warned yesterday.

UK troops complete giant turbine mission

British troops have successfully completed one of their largest operations in southern Afghanistan, transporting a massive hydro-electricity turbine more than 100 miles through Taliban territory, it was revealed today.

Save money and the planet: generate your own power

The latest energy price hike is a good incentive for us all to find alternatives, says James Daley
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Refugee crisis: David Cameron lowered the flag for the dead king of Saudi Arabia - will he do the same honour for little Aylan Kurdi?

Cameron lowered the flag for the dead king of Saudi Arabia...

But will he do the same honour for little Aylan Kurdi, asks Robert Fisk
Our leaders lack courage in this refugee crisis. We are shamed by our European neighbours

Our leaders lack courage in this refugee crisis. We are shamed by our European neighbours

Humanity must be at the heart of politics, says Jeremy Corbyn
Joe Biden's 'tease tour': Could the US Vice-President be testing the water for a presidential run?

Joe Biden's 'tease tour'

Could the US Vice-President be testing the water for a presidential run?
Britain's 24-hour culture: With the 'leisured society' a distant dream we're working longer and less regular hours than ever

Britain's 24-hour culture

With the 'leisured society' a distant dream we're working longer and less regular hours than ever
Diplomacy board game: Treachery is the way to win - which makes it just like the real thing

The addictive nature of Diplomacy

Bullying, betrayal, aggression – it may be just a board game, but the family that plays Diplomacy may never look at each other in the same way again
8 best children's clocks

Tick-tock: 8 best children's clocks

Whether you’re teaching them to tell the time or putting the finishing touches to a nursery, there’s a ticker for that
Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

How Isis profits from destruction of antiquities

Robert Fisk on the terrorist group's manipulation of the market to increase the price of artefacts
Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

In an exclusive interview, Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea
Tunisia fears its Arab Spring could be reversed as the new regime becomes as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor

The Arab Spring reversed

Tunisian protesters fear that a new law will whitewash corrupt businessmen and officials, but they are finding that the new regime is becoming as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor
King Arthur: Legendary figure was real and lived most of his life in Strathclyde, academic claims

Academic claims King Arthur was real - and reveals where he lived

Dr Andrew Breeze says the legendary figure did exist – but was a general, not a king
Who is Oliver Bonas and how has he captured middle-class hearts?

Who is Oliver Bonas?

It's the first high-street store to pay its staff the living wage, and it saw out the recession in style
Earth has 'lost more than half its trees' since humans first started cutting them down

Axe-wielding Man fells half the world’s trees – leaving us just 422 each

However, the number of trees may be eight times higher than previously thought
60 years of Scalextric: Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones

60 years of Scalextric

Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones
Theme parks continue to draw in thrill-seekers despite the risks - so why are we so addicted?

Why are we addicted to theme parks?

Now that Banksy has unveiled his own dystopian version, Christopher Beanland considers the ups and downs of our endless quest for amusement
Tourism in Iran: The country will soon be opening up again after years of isolation

Iran is opening up again to tourists

After years of isolation, Iran is reopening its embassies abroad. Soon, there'll be the chance for the adventurous to holiday there