News In other news ... Jon Snow performed at last year's Newsroom's Got Talent charity event

The veteran Channel 4 host let readers in on the inner workings of his mind – and it’s not as laundered as one might have thought

Martin Creed: Mothers, Hauser & Wirth, Savile Row, London

This twinset of behemoth galleries near Savile Row, opened by Hauser & Wirth last October, feel more like something that you would find in the post-industrial landscape of New York's Chelsea gallery district, than they do premises located on London's historic tailoring street. They opened with an exhibition of work by the late Louise Bourgeois – her menacing, crouching steel spider sculpture patrolling the galleries. And so, now, we welcome Martin Creed to the space to give it to give it a lick of his likeable shtick. The Turner Prize-winning artist often works in a rule-based way – regularly letting his materials dictate the work. Some of the paintings in this exhibition are made by taking a set of brushes and making a single stripe with every size, so that you end up with something that looks like a set of stairs or a stack of colour, in yellow, green or pink. They are like comical Frank Stellas: they are what they are. What they are, in this show, however, is overabundant, and the hang is a bit hodgepodge.

Farewell to an erudite and searingly honest art critic

Figures from the art world joined friends, family and colleagues at the funeral of The Independent's art critic Tom Lubbock yesterday.

The artists to watch in 2011

The Catlin Art Guide picks the cream of the art school graduates

Love is futile, the therapist used to preach. Look at her now

When the London psychotherapist, Anouchka Grose, began writing her pessimistic self-help book No More Silly Love Songs, she was wary about her chances of finding love. Her one burning question about romance was: "Why bother?"

The Best Art You've Never Seen, By Julian Spalding

Beautifully presented, full of remarkable artworks partnered by crisp essays, this book still needs a large pinch of sceptical salt.

Video: Turner Prize jury goes for a song

Susan Philipsz becomes first sound artist to receive prestigious award.

Michael Glover: Three cheers for sound artists. But not this one

If we wanted to be slightly facetious, we could call it history in the making. Sound artists are on the march! Never before in the 26-year history of the Turner Prize has it been won by an artist who had nothing to show for her £25,000 prize money but sounds fabricated by her own voice.

Now the Turner Prize jury goes for a song

Susan Philipsz becomes first sound artist to receive prestigious award

Cultural Life: Susan Philipsz, artist

Visual Arts: Michael Fullerton's recent show Columbia at Chisenhale Gallery worked on many different levels. It was intelligent, thought-provoking, tender and beautiful all at the same time. In Warsaw, the Museum of Modern Art are doing some really interesting things. They create projects around the city and harness the support of the artist community that lives there.

Where sound meets vision

The artist Martin Creed is performing a rock gig tonight, and a soundscape is a contender for the Turner prize. Gillian Orr patrols the shadowy borderlands where art and music collide

Cultural Life: Angela de la Cruz, artist

Visual Arts: The last exhibitions I went to see were Wolfgang Tillmans and Jean Nouvel. The Jean Nouvel pavilion was wonderful and the Wolfgang Tillmans exhibition was very exciting. I also saw the Fiona Banner installation at the Tate Britain, which I also think was good and impressive.

Turner Prize 2010, Tate Britain, London

This year's competition is more than usually rational and really rather good, but please, can we skip the tedious theorising – just once before I die?

The 2010 Turner Prize: pretentious, controversial, or just art?

Bosses of the annual, and much hyped, Turner Prize (remember Hirst's formaldehyde shark, or Emin's dishevelled bed?) made a right exhibtion of themseleves this week trying to ban bad publicity.

Turner Prize is far from picture perfect

You can almost guarantee The Turner Prize to cause a rumpus for one reason or another but this year's row was an unusual spat between the photographers who'd arrived to cover the exhibition's launch and Tate Britain.

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