Arts and Entertainment Pen pals: Vanessa Redgrave and Olivia Colman in 'The Thirteenth Tale'

Lots of good stories start like this: an overcast sky, a lone woman pulling up the gravel driveway of a large house and a frowning housekeeper waiting on the doorstep to meet her. This feature-length adaptation Diane Setterfield's novel The Thirteenth Tale (BBC2) had all the makings of an atmospheric gothic horror, and it didn't disappoint.

A Graves Injustice?

THEATRE

Jonathan Aitken facts

JONATHAN AND THE YOUNG METEORS.

The World's End is nigh

Theatre

Yates (Paula), Camus and Eco ... thoughts on a dream team

What is the midfielder telling the world about himself? He is the party host who fades into the background when the speeches are made, the hard-working office manager who is the first to congratulate those less talented than him on their promotion. Ill at ease with his own success, he is a facilitator, an enabler, with a strong sense of family. Many nurses are midfielders. On the pitch, he is Batto, Robbo, Wisey. Off the pitch, Umberto Eco, Dr Johnson, Vanessa Redgrave, Mark Knopfler, Saatchi and Saatchi.

Zinnemann dies at 89

Fred Zinnermann, the Oscar-winning film director who dramatised issues of conscience in films including High Noon, A Man for All Seasons and Julia, died on Friday at his home in London, writes Matt Wolf of Associated Press.

PASSED/FAILED: Lucinda Lambton

Lucinda Lambton, 53, is a writer, broadcaster and photographer. She will present the fourth in the BBC2 series `Travels with Pevsner'.which starts this Saturday, `Temples of Convenience' and `Chambers of Delight' appear next month as a one-volume paperback. `Lucinda Lambton's Alphabet of Britain' is the book of her previous television series.

Mission impossible

Roger Dobson meets the Tory woman who says she can win the safest Labour seat in the country writes

Now all the heroes have hard drives

Suddenly, booting up is very big at the box office. But Hollywood's attempt to get wired has had comic consequences

No sneezing please, we're British

Paul Binding reflects on the significance of hay fever and the shortcomings of the Condition-of-England novel

A NEW PEAK FOR EVEREST

Mission: Impossible, most fashionable movie of the summer, has spawned an unlikely new hero: the tailor Timothy Everest, creator of the film's discreet but impossibly sophisticated grey suits

A little shaken, but not stirred

FILM

Why Gambon isn't big enough for States over 3 deckys hy

Equity rules: Producer condemns eccentric decision as leading actor fails to land Broadway role because he lacks `star status'

US BOX-OFFICE CHART

The season of the blockbusters has descended upon America. The daddy of them all, Mission: Impossible has, predictably, gone straight to the top of the charts, opening on 3,012 screens across the country. It's released here on 5 July. This takes the wind out of the tornado thriller Twister. The lame James Bond spoof Spy Hard makes a surprisingly good showing. It opened here and in the US on the same day, a trick distributors play to capitalise on business before word gets around of how bad a film is. (All figures denote weekend box-office only)

One tinker's curse too many THEATRE

Taming of the Shrew RSC, Stratford

OBITUARY : Robert Bolt

The author of A Man for All Seasons and the writer of the screenplays for Lawrence of Arabia and Doctor Zhivago, Robert Bolt occupied a place in the history of the modern British theatre that is difficult to define. He belonged to no school, but continued a tradition that was declining when he began to write, revived it and took it forward to new successes.
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Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Dubrovnik, the Dalmatian Coast & Montenegro
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Lisbon, Oporto and the Douro Valley
Lake Garda, Venice & Verona
Spain
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Syria crisis: Celebrities call on David Cameron to take more refugees as one young mother tells of torture by Assad regime

Celebrities call on David Cameron to take more Syrian refugees

One young mother tells of torture by Assad regime
The enemy within: People who hear voices in their heads are being encouraged to talk back – with promising results

The enemy within

People who hear voices in their heads are being encouraged to talk back
'In Auschwitz you got used to anything'

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Survivors of the Nazi concentration camp remember its horror, 70 years on
Autumn/winter menswear 2015: The uniforms that make up modern life come to the fore

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The uniforms that make up modern life come to the fore
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Army general planning to come out
Iraq invasion 2003: The bloody warnings six wise men gave to Tony Blair as he prepared to launch poorly planned campaign

What the six wise men told Tony Blair

Months before the invasion of Iraq in 2003, experts sought to warn the PM about his plans. Here, four of them recall that day
25 years of The Independent on Sunday: The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century

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The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century
Homeless Veterans appeal: 'Really caring is a dangerous emotion in this kind of work'

Homeless Veterans appeal

As head of The Soldiers' Charity, Martin Rutledge has to temper compassion with realism. He tells Chris Green how his Army career prepared him
Wu-Tang Clan and The Sexual Objects offer fans a chance to own the only copies of their latest albums

Smash hit go under the hammer

It's nice to pick up a new record once in a while, but the purchasers of two latest releases can go a step further - by buying the only copy
Geeks who rocked the world: Documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry

The geeks who rocked the world

A new documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry
Belle & Sebastian interview: Stuart Murdoch reveals how the band is taking a new direction

Belle & Sebastian is taking a new direction

Twenty years ago, Belle & Sebastian was a fey indie band from Glasgow. It still is – except today, as prime mover Stuart Murdoch admits, it has a global cult following, from Hollywood to South Korea
America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

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These days in the US things are pretty much stuck where they are, both in politics and society at large, says Rupert Cornwell
A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A veteran of the Fifties campaigns is inspiring a new generation of activists
Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

A C Benson called him 'a horrid little fellow', George Orwell would have shot him, but what a giant he seems now, says DJ Taylor
Growing mussels: Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project

Growing mussels

Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project