Name

Adrian Hamilton

Bio
The Independent’s former comment editor, Adrian Hamilton writes a weekly column largely on international affairs with particular focus on the Middle East, Iran and foreign policy issues. Before joining the paper he was deputy editor of the Observer newspaper.

Actually, there is a point to Martin Creed

The Hayward Gallery’s What Is the Point of It? is the first major retrospective of the Turner Prize-winning minimalist. His quirky works can be both entertaining and exasperating, but they’re always full of surprises, discovers Adrian Hamilton

Simon Hoggart: Columnist who delighted readers for decades with a wit

Comedy is a terribly strained trick in journalism, the comedy of politics even more difficult. It's too easy to fall into vituperation or puerility. But Simon Hoggart managed it day after day, not just in his parliamentary sketches, which he had written for The Guardian for the last 20 years, but also in his foreign and political reporting for The Observer in the decade before. His was always the piece you looked forward to, not just because it was always so incisive but also so genuinely funny.

Body Language at the Saatchi Gallery: A mixed body of work

The Saatchi Gallery's new exhibition shows that figurative art is alive and kicking, especially in America. But the artists' vast canvases and impressive use of colour can't disguise their lack of graphic skills, says Adrian Hamilton

The Socialist Network: Art turning left...

From the French Revolution to the present day, left-wing values have long influenced the production and reception of art. A fascinating and far-ranging exhibition at Tate Liverpool explains how

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The river runs deep: Whistler in London

A new exhibition of Whistler’s etchings and paintings of the Thames displays his extraordinary talent for capturing the atmosphere and bustle of life in 19th-century London, says Adrian Hamilton

Paul Klee: Triumph of a 'degenerate'

Denounced by the Nazis, Klee is one of the best-known Modernist artists, yet he has not been as influential as his contemporaries. A new Tate exhibition will change that, says Adrian Hamilton