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The Saturday Quiz: Try our weekly brain teaser

1. What links the last king of Albania with the home of puppets Zig & Zag?

The Saturday Quiz answers

Here are the answers to this week's quiz...

The Saturday Quiz: Try our weekly brain teaser

1. Which is the only ship to have been sunk by a nuclear submarine?

The Saturday Quiz answers

Here are the answers to this week's quiz...

Who plays the intelligent chimp Caesar in the most recent Planet of the Apes films?

The Saturday Quiz: Try our weekly brain teaser

1. Which girl's name was popularised by the playwright JM Barrie?

The Pope banned Machiavelli's <em><b>The Prince</b></em> in 1559 for promoting anti-Christian beliefs. It is a political manifesto, examining power structures and promoting military rule, which Machiavelli wrote in 1513 but which was only published after his death.

The Saturday quiz: Try our weekly brainteaser

1. The father of which singer and songwriter, who released an album last month, fought in the First World War?

The Saturday quiz answers

Here are the answers to this week's quiz...

The Saturday Quiz: Try our weekly brainteaser

1. What is the cost of a 1st class UK stamp?

The Saturday Quiz answers

Here are the answers to this week's quiz

Exuberant personality: Malorie Blackman

The Saturday Quiz: Try our weekly brainteaser

1. Which actress had a lion called Winston Churchill and a monkey called King Kong?

The Saturday Quiz answers

Here are the answers to this week's quiz

The Saturday Quiz answers

Here are the answers to this week's quiz...

The Saturday Quiz: Try our weekly brain teaser

1. Who is the Church of England's only saint?

The Saturday Quiz answers

Here are the answers to this week's quiz...

The Saturday Quiz: Try our weekly brain teaser

1. Which group, who had UK chart hits in the '50s, '60s and '70s, and currently exists in two versions, has had more than 60 members?

Day planner 23 - 29 August

pick of the week

Site unseen: Conrad Noel's house, Thaxted, Essex

Recent events in Northern Ireland have confirmed the potency of symbols. For the Orange Order, their alleged right to march where they please, accompanied by flags and bands and clad in sashes and bowler hats, is an essential part of their identity.

Alister Morgan on clubs

The A2070, to Brenzett in Kent, doesn't lead to the coast, but it will be jammed over this Bank Holiday weekend. Lydd Airport is preparing to welcome thousands of revellers for 19 hours of music, six arenas and more than 60 DJs, courtesy of World of Dance.

Iain Gale on exhibitions

It may be undergoing a revitalisation in the hands of artists and artisans, but little has changed in the physical character of the East End over the last 100 years. Walk the streets of Whitechapel and Spitalfields and you will still feel the presence of Jack the Ripper. And this is the mood evoked by Stephen Harwood in his disturbing paintings currently on view in Hackney.

Ryan Gilbey on film

The young actress Emily Watson sometimes looks startled or terrified, and sometimes paralysed with glee. She has twinkling button-eyes pressed into her face like currants in dough, and a nose that seems in a permanent state of wrinkle-ment. She's a newcomer, and I think it shows in her performance in Breaking the Waves, the extraordinary new film from Lars Von Trier, director of The Kingdom. That's not to say that there's anything unconvincing or slack about her. Just that she seems untouched. By what? By technique or contrivance. By anything. That's fitting. She plays Bess, a woman on the Isle of Skye who falls quickly and passionately in love with an oil- rig worker. Their marriage (right) - of which the repressed, buttoned- to-the-collar elders disapprove - is a rollercoaster ride on a broken track. After a period of elation, tragedy strikes. The picture changes gear.

BBC Proms 96

Tonight's Prom

James Rampton on comedy

Jack Dee achieved what very few people thought was possible: he made stand-up work on television. From his Channel 4 show flowed projects of varying advisability (Jack Dee's Saturday Night, Jack and Jeremy's Real Lives) and a highly-lucrative advertising campaign for beer. Dee (below) has become so busy with all these television vehicles that live appearances are now something of a rarity, an event, even.

16 -22 August day planner

Today

Julian May on folk

The Queen Elizabeth Hall is more a lecture theatre than a dance venue. Even the most effervescent performers have difficulty stirring the frigid gloom of the place - last time Salif Keita sang there, he actually knelt at the front of the stage appealing to his audience to get up and move. This adds to the allure of the big gig on Sunday of this year's excellent South Bank Folk Festival, the only appearance in England of La Bottine Souriante, who have been blasting their traditional Quebecois cajun celtic salsa jazz around the world for 20 years. The cover of their new CD, La Mistrine, makes their intention clear: in Bruegal's Peasant Wedding, cunningly dotted among the dancers strutting, codpieces akimbo, is the band. Here a shaven-headed accordionist in shades, a fiddler, double bass, mandolin, there a singer in pork-pie hat and matching paunch, and, jamming alongside Bruegal's piper, a sax player and a trombonist, half of their horn section. Le Bottine Souriante look quite at home.

The 24 Seven Guide: Always on my mind

On the 19th anniversary of Presley's death, it's now or never for the enormous band of Elvis tribute acts. Anthony Clavane tiptoes around the blue suede shoes

Television & Radio: On the box

The recent repeats of Whatever Happened to the Likely Lads? reminded us of the marvellously comic lugubriousness of James Bolam (right). No doubt it will be on show again in The Missing Postman, a new two-part drama for BBC1 which starts filming this month. Mark Wallington's screenplay casts Bolam as Clive Peacock, a postman who refuses to take early retirement and resolves to give his employers what-for by hand-delivering his last collection. The police chase him up and down the country as he cycles around in imitation of the Pony Express. The media latches onto the story and dubs him "the people's postman". Postmen just can't keep out of the news at the moment.

Television & Radio: Old habits die hard

Returning to the small screen as Cadfael, a 12th-century monk detective, was a spiritual experience for Derek Jacobi. James Rampton reports

Angela Lewis on pop

At the V96, where Paul Weller headlines in Chelmsford on Sunday, one thing is guaranteed - The Cardigans will be the politest band on the bill. When the Swedish smilers were on the road earlier this year, part of the amusement was concentrating to hear whether vocalist Nina Persson slipped up and forgot to deliver one of her ever-so-gracious thank-yous at the end of a song. She never did. You almost expected her to curtsey along with it. With the help of fellow Swedes the Wannadies, The Cardigans (right) have given Euro indie pop a good name. Maybe sometimes their music is so neat it could be the result of a laboratory experiment, but the tacky glamour - Barbie Doll vocals, slinky Abba-meets-The-Smiths melodies - are getting more irresistible all the time.

Iain Gale on exhibitions

Old habits die hard. In post-empire Britain we still tend to characterise Indian painting solely in terms of those exquisite miniatures on view in the V&A and the British Museum. Elegant and passionate images of religion and folklore, history and warfare, of the type famously collected by Howard Hodgkin. That there is much more, however, than these to the artistic creativity of a continent is immediately evident on entering a recently opened gallery in London's Mayfair.

David Benedict on theatre

"What was my crime?" asked a faux naif Michael White in the Evening Standard last week. "To put on a fun musical that doesn't have a plot, has lots of beautiful girls and a great soundtrack and which threw the theatre critics who are steeped in the tradition of Rodgers and Hammerstein." Come, come. I can hear the sound of eyelids fluttering from here. The reason for the less than fulsome praise of the meretricious Voyeurz was hardly its lack of closely plotted uplift, gingham or curtain costumes and other staples from Oklahoma or The Sound of Music.
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