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The Saturday Quiz answers

Here are the answers to this week's quiz...

The Saturday Quiz: Try our weekly brain teaser

1. The failed Lionel Bart musical "Twang!!" was based on the exploits of which fictional character?

The Saturday Quiz answers

Here are the answers to this week's quiz...

Sir Chris Hoy won six Olympic golds - in which four events?

The Saturday Quiz: Try our weekly brain teaser

1. Harry Nilsson's flat in Curzon Street, Mayfair, saw two pop stars' deaths, one in 1974, the other in 1978. Whose?

The Saturday Quiz answers

Here are the answers to this week's quiz...

What was this name of this film, starring Leonardo di Caprio as confidence trickster Frank Abagnale Jr?

The Saturday Quiz: Try our weekly brain teaser

1. Which was the second country in the world, after Great Britain, to issue postage stamps valid within the entire country?

The Saturday Quiz answers

Here are the answers to this week's quiz...

The Saturday Quiz: Try our weekly brain teaser

1. What links Jarvis Cocker and Radiohead's Jonny Greenwood and Phil Selway?

Hollie Cook's father was a member of which band?

The Saturday Quiz: Try our weekly brain teaser

1. "Crying, talking, sleeping, walking". What comes next?

The Saturday Quiz answers

Here are the answers to this week's quiz...

The Saturday Quiz answers

Here are the answers to this week's quiz...

What connects Dizzee Rascal (pictured), Russell Brand and Caitlin Moran?

The Saturday Quiz: Try our weekly brain teaser

1. What was recently named the UK's most downloaded song?

The Saturday Quiz answers

 

American aviator Douglas Corrigan was nicknamed 'Wrong Way' after he allegedly flew across where by mistake in 1938?

The Saturday Quiz answers

 

Joining the chain gang

Action 100 Bike Ride 25 Aug

Radio review

The death of Rabbi Hugo Grynn might well give The Moral Maze pause - and it did for a moment at the start of yesterday's edition, when Michael Buerk delivered a short tribute, before releasing the ferrets on to the question of the hour. But the Rabbi's going creates a loss which the programme will find difficult to make up. It was a matter of tone, perhaps, more than content. He was, for one thing, the only person on the Maze who ever sounded puzzled. He provided a steadying ground around which those other strident voices could play.

Day planner 23 - 29 August

pick of the week

Site unseen: Conrad Noel's house, Thaxted, Essex

Recent events in Northern Ireland have confirmed the potency of symbols. For the Orange Order, their alleged right to march where they please, accompanied by flags and bands and clad in sashes and bowler hats, is an essential part of their identity.

Television & Radio: On the box

The recent repeats of Whatever Happened to the Likely Lads? reminded us of the marvellously comic lugubriousness of James Bolam (right). No doubt it will be on show again in The Missing Postman, a new two-part drama for BBC1 which starts filming this month. Mark Wallington's screenplay casts Bolam as Clive Peacock, a postman who refuses to take early retirement and resolves to give his employers what-for by hand-delivering his last collection. The police chase him up and down the country as he cycles around in imitation of the Pony Express. The media latches onto the story and dubs him "the people's postman". Postmen just can't keep out of the news at the moment.

Television & Radio: Old habits die hard

Returning to the small screen as Cadfael, a 12th-century monk detective, was a spiritual experience for Derek Jacobi. James Rampton reports

Angela Lewis on pop

At the V96, where Paul Weller headlines in Chelmsford on Sunday, one thing is guaranteed - The Cardigans will be the politest band on the bill. When the Swedish smilers were on the road earlier this year, part of the amusement was concentrating to hear whether vocalist Nina Persson slipped up and forgot to deliver one of her ever-so-gracious thank-yous at the end of a song. She never did. You almost expected her to curtsey along with it. With the help of fellow Swedes the Wannadies, The Cardigans (right) have given Euro indie pop a good name. Maybe sometimes their music is so neat it could be the result of a laboratory experiment, but the tacky glamour - Barbie Doll vocals, slinky Abba-meets-The-Smiths melodies - are getting more irresistible all the time.

Iain Gale on exhibitions

Old habits die hard. In post-empire Britain we still tend to characterise Indian painting solely in terms of those exquisite miniatures on view in the V&A and the British Museum. Elegant and passionate images of religion and folklore, history and warfare, of the type famously collected by Howard Hodgkin. That there is much more, however, than these to the artistic creativity of a continent is immediately evident on entering a recently opened gallery in London's Mayfair.

David Benedict on theatre

"What was my crime?" asked a faux naif Michael White in the Evening Standard last week. "To put on a fun musical that doesn't have a plot, has lots of beautiful girls and a great soundtrack and which threw the theatre critics who are steeped in the tradition of Rodgers and Hammerstein." Come, come. I can hear the sound of eyelids fluttering from here. The reason for the less than fulsome praise of the meretricious Voyeurz was hardly its lack of closely plotted uplift, gingham or curtain costumes and other staples from Oklahoma or The Sound of Music.

Ryan Gilbey on film

The young actress Emily Watson sometimes looks startled or terrified, and sometimes paralysed with glee. She has twinkling button-eyes pressed into her face like currants in dough, and a nose that seems in a permanent state of wrinkle-ment. She's a newcomer, and I think it shows in her performance in Breaking the Waves, the extraordinary new film from Lars Von Trier, director of The Kingdom. That's not to say that there's anything unconvincing or slack about her. Just that she seems untouched. By what? By technique or contrivance. By anything. That's fitting. She plays Bess, a woman on the Isle of Skye who falls quickly and passionately in love with an oil- rig worker. Their marriage (right) - of which the repressed, buttoned- to-the-collar elders disapprove - is a rollercoaster ride on a broken track. After a period of elation, tragedy strikes. The picture changes gear.

BBC Proms 96

Tonight's Prom

James Rampton on comedy

Jack Dee achieved what very few people thought was possible: he made stand-up work on television. From his Channel 4 show flowed projects of varying advisability (Jack Dee's Saturday Night, Jack and Jeremy's Real Lives) and a highly-lucrative advertising campaign for beer. Dee (below) has become so busy with all these television vehicles that live appearances are now something of a rarity, an event, even.

16 -22 August day planner

Today

Julian May on folk

The Queen Elizabeth Hall is more a lecture theatre than a dance venue. Even the most effervescent performers have difficulty stirring the frigid gloom of the place - last time Salif Keita sang there, he actually knelt at the front of the stage appealing to his audience to get up and move. This adds to the allure of the big gig on Sunday of this year's excellent South Bank Folk Festival, the only appearance in England of La Bottine Souriante, who have been blasting their traditional Quebecois cajun celtic salsa jazz around the world for 20 years. The cover of their new CD, La Mistrine, makes their intention clear: in Bruegal's Peasant Wedding, cunningly dotted among the dancers strutting, codpieces akimbo, is the band. Here a shaven-headed accordionist in shades, a fiddler, double bass, mandolin, there a singer in pork-pie hat and matching paunch, and, jamming alongside Bruegal's piper, a sax player and a trombonist, half of their horn section. Le Bottine Souriante look quite at home.

The 24 Seven Guide: Always on my mind

On the 19th anniversary of Presley's death, it's now or never for the enormous band of Elvis tribute acts. Anthony Clavane tiptoes around the blue suede shoes
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