A life of debt begins here: Will student's money worries ever end?

Once they have graduated, the students of tomorrow face a bleak financial future: tuition fee repayments, a grim jobs market, outrageous house prices and ageing, needy parents. Will their money worries ever end? Amol Rajan does the sums

American liberal arts colleges: Where art meets science

In 1959, the British scientist and novelist CP Snow warned of a divide between scientists and "literary intellectuals". He explained that few of his friends and colleagues had both read one of Shakespeare's plays and could explain the second law of thermodynamics. The British education system, he argued, forced children to specialise at too early an age, pushing them towards either the arts or science and industry. More than half a century later, how much has changed?

Going the distance: Why online learning is gaining ground

Some students never set foot in a lecture theatre. They never pace the library aisles, queue for a computer or struggle to get their voices heard at a seminar. In fact, some students manage to complete their degrees without so much as leaving their homes – and, according to Julie Stone, business development manager at the University of Derby, they are among the most dedicated. "Learning online requires commitment," she says. "When we started developing online programmes, in 2001, it was a marginal activity because there simply weren't the students." That changed in 2008, when applications suddenly flooded in – there are now about 1,500 online students on Derby's books. "We anticipate significant growth over the next five years," says Stone. "We're investing in online education as a core part of our business."

Chalk Talk: Universities can charge what they like – just as long as it's not too much

Is it just me, or is there not something Kafkaesque about the Coalition Government's proposals for raising tuition fees? It starts off with the Government telling universities they can raise their student fees to a maximum of £9,000 a year.

The University debate: There's more than one way to learn

Going up to Oxford taught the novelist Philip Hensher life's possibilities. Going straight into employment gave the entrepreneur Simon Dolan a head start at work. So who had the advantage?

The University Debate: What the Ivy League can teach Britain

High costs are an accepted part of college education in the US – and they pay for world-class teaching. Dr Terence Kealey, vice-chancellor of Britain's only private university, argues that it's time we followed America's example

The University Debate: We must not open the doors to all

Why are we trying to create quotas for access to higher education via political meddling, asks Dominic Lawson. In the second part of our debate, he argues that while it may not be malicious, it is stupid

How to make your degree pay

Worcester University has one of the best graduate employment rates in the country. The reason? Its efforts to prepare students for the world of work. Richard Garner finds out how they do it – and asks: is this the future for higher education?

Tristan Learoyd: 'The changes to funding go against all that universities are about'

Learoyd is one of the country's highest-flying academics. But he's leaving education for ever in protest at the changes to funding. He tells Richard Garner why

Why is the government not actively supporting the future of University-anchored teacher training?

The Times Education Supplement Survey showed a total of 58 per cent of people would prefer to employ a university-trained newly qualified teacher.

Power to the pupils: A Bristol school is giving students a say in key decisions

Pupils have a say in key decisions, from interviewing new teachers to deciding how much homework should be set. Could the idea catch on?

Is this the end for the 'academic year'?

Steve McCormack discovers why more and more universities are offering second-semester starts to students

William Richardson: 'Universities have a lot to learn from private schools'

As the new spokesman for Britain's elite schools takes up his post, he offers his predictions for the future to Richard Garner

Riots, reviews and results: Why 2011 will prove to be a steep learning curve for students and teachers

It's been a tumultuous 12 months thanks to a new Government with big ideas. Richard Garner gives his end-of-year report

Lessons in the beautiful game: True fanatics can now enroll in a degree in football

Gazing out upon the hallowed green rectangle of Burnley's Turf Moor, it is not hard to imagine the glories of days past. Although it may be half a century since the Clarets scaled the very pinnacle of the English game and last season's sojourn in the Premier League proved, sadly, all too short-lived, a passion for football still burns bright in the Lancashire mill town, where the game has forged a common bond for people during the long years of industrial decline.

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