Extras

From Apple's latest shiny playthings to the best smartphones from Google, we pick our favourite gadgets of 2013

Tech Talk: Do you really need that new iProduct or is it just short-term gadget lust?

A few weeks ago, I found myself being guided, as if by an invisible force, to an electrical shop in New Malden. It takes exceptional circumstances to put me in New Malden, and this occasion was no different; my brain (the invisible force in question) had decided I urgently needed to acquire the latest iPad.

Terry Deary: 'I'm not some Koko the Clown coming over to perform for you'

As the BBC takes 'Horrible Histories' primetime, its creator, Terry Deary, speaks his mind to Kunal Dutta

Letters: Cable and the unions

Cable's threat to the unions

Investment Column: Bloomsbury's shares look fairly valued

Renold; Harvey Nash

Simon Carr: Advice to Ed: just say what you mean

For some reason when Labour politicians go out to ‘listen to people’ they only hear what they want to hear

Philip Hensher: Domesday lessons for the e-generation

The Domesday Book is actually two volumes, to be found in the national archives.

Between The Covers: 08/05/2011

Your weekly guide to what's really going on inside the world of books

Web proves an unlikely saviour for investigative journalism

We're often told that the digital age has curtailed our attention span. Our patience is sorely tested by anything that doesn't grab us instantly; lengthy blog posts are routinely suffixed with "TLTR" (too long to read) and if you're still with me now – some 50 words in – you should give yourself a pat on the back because conventional wisdom deems you to be one of a dying breed.

Arifa Akbar: Death-defying authors in a digital age

The week in books

Tom Hodgkinson: 'Nothing dates so fast as a futurist'

Reports of the death of the book are, I think, greatly exaggerated. The futurists out there would have us believe that ugly utilitarian devices such as the Kindle and other e-readers will gradually replace sheets of printed paper bound with glue or string. They see a world where we will instantly download any title of our choice while waiting in airport lounges and the quaint old bookshop will be a thing of the past. The techno-utopians even claim, absurdly, that there is some sort of ecological advantage to this, and that trees will be saved, forgetting that trees are a sustainable resource, while plastic is not.

Being Modern: E-readers

O brave new world, that has such gadgets in it! As if we have not yet been thrilled enough by the manifold delights of your ongoing digital revolution, you have now given us a device – as light and convenient as, well, a book – that enables us to carry the contents of a small local library around with us at all times.

Class exclusive: Seven in 10 of us belong to Middle Britain

A major new survey into social attitudes identifies six tribes among the nation's aspirational classes. John Rentoul and Matt Chorley examine the report's fascinating and provocative findings

The Hanging Shed, By Gordon Ferris

Gripped by Glasgow's mean streets

Between The Covers: 27/02/2011

Your weekly guide to what's really going on inside the world of books
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Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
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Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
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Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

How Isis profits from destruction of antiquities

Robert Fisk on the terrorist group's manipulation of the market to increase the price of artefacts
Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

In an exclusive interview, Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea
Tunisia fears its Arab Spring could be reversed as the new regime becomes as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor

The Arab Spring reversed

Tunisian protesters fear that a new law will whitewash corrupt businessmen and officials, but they are finding that the new regime is becoming as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor
King Arthur: Legendary figure was real and lived most of his life in Strathclyde, academic claims

Academic claims King Arthur was real - and reveals where he lived

Dr Andrew Breeze says the legendary figure did exist – but was a general, not a king
Earth has 'lost more than half its trees' since humans first started cutting them down

Axe-wielding Man fells half the world’s trees – leaving us just 422 each

However, the number of trees may be eight times higher than previously thought
Theme parks continue to draw in thrill-seekers despite the risks - so why are we so addicted?

Why are we addicted to theme parks?

Now that Banksy has unveiled his own dystopian version, Christopher Beanland considers the ups and downs of our endless quest for amusement
Tourism in Iran: The country will soon be opening up again after years of isolation

Iran is opening up again to tourists

After years of isolation, Iran is reopening its embassies abroad. Soon, there'll be the chance for the adventurous to holiday there
10 best PS4 games

10 best PS4 games

Can’t wait for the new round of blockbusters due out this autumn? We played through last year’s offering
Transfer window: Ten things we learnt

Ten things we learnt from the transfer window

Record-breaking spending shows FFP restraint no longer applies
Migrant crisis: UN official Philippe Douste-Blazy reveals the harrowing sights he encountered among refugees arriving on Lampedusa

‘Can we really just turn away?’

Dead bodies, men drowning, women miscarrying – a senior UN figure on the horrors he has witnessed among migrants arriving on Lampedusa, and urges politicians not to underestimate our caring nature
Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger as Isis ravages centuries of history

Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger...

... and not just because of Isis vandalism
Girl on a Plane: An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack

Girl on a Plane

An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack
Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

The author of 'The Day of the Jackal' has revealed he spied for MI6 while a foreign correspondent
Markus Persson: If being that rich is so bad, why not just give it all away?

That's a bit rich

The billionaire inventor of computer game Minecraft says he is bored, lonely and isolated by his vast wealth. If it’s that bad, says Simon Kelner, why not just give it all away?
Euro 2016: Chris Coleman on course to end half a century of hurt for Wales

Coleman on course to end half a century of hurt for Wales

Wales last qualified for major tournament in 1958 but after several near misses the current crop can book place at Euro 2016 and end all the indifference