Annie Lennox

Julie Burchill Julie Burchill: Never mind the Lennox

I loathe London and visit it as little as I can. But on the the other hand, I find it hard to resist the sight of a self-deceiving tool making a spectacle of themselves. So I really do mean to make a special effort to visit the forthcoming V&A exhibition, "The House of Annie Lennox", which runs from next month until the end of February and to which admission is absolutely free. In such cash-strapped times, I foresee many a middle-class Mumsnetter using this outing in lieu of the traditional panto. It will certainly provide the usual prompts for audience debate and participation: "Annie Lennox is a hypocritical cow to criticise Rihanna for prancing around in her scanties when she regularly used to take her top off onstage back in the day!" "O no, she's not!" – "O yes, she is!" – and so on.

Hits of the Brits

Next week's Brit Awards include a category commemorating the most memorable performance of the show's past 30 years, writes Elisa Bray

Party Of The Week: Who's That Girl? Annie holds court

The Old Vic's artistic director, Kevin Spacey, sneaked into a star-studded musical tribute to Annie Lennox at London's Guildhall to surprise the Eurythmics singer straight after his nightly turn in Inherit the Wind.

More headlines

Mandela is free, but another star is in purgatory

The world has changed since 1986. But not that much. Back in the day, thousands of footsore opponents of South Africa's apartheid regime marched through south London to Clapham Common, where they settled back to enjoy a free concert to highlight their righteous cause. The event, a year after Live Aid, heralded a sea change in popular opposition to the Pretoria government. Today – two major Wembley concerts later – Nelson Mandela has been out of jail for 18 years, South Africa is putting its segregated past behind it and the former political prisoner is elevated to the status of the world's most revered statesman.