What is the future for Britain’s antiques trade?

Last year, just weeks after celebrating the 75th annual Grosvenor House Art & Antiques Fair in June 2009, the organisers announced it was to close for good, citing declining profit, increased costs and demands on the space for closure.

Gangs target historic homes for porcelain works of art

An Englishman's home has traditionally been his castle. But stately homeowners are under siege from gangs of thieves, who are breaking in and stealing valuable porcelain items, a criminal expert has said. The former senior Scotland Yard officer warned the owners of England's most beautiful houses to tighten security after the wave of thefts.

Last Night's TV: Junior Apprentice, BBC1<br />Cracking Antiques, BBC2

It's The Apprentice, but not quite as we know it. For one thing, Surallen has gone – that terrified smear of an honorific rendered obsolete by last year's ennoblement. It's Lord Sugar now, which doesn't have the same ring to it at all, though it did provide for one unintentional moment of comedy in last night's opener, when a prospective firee fell over himself trying to make the depths of his humility clear: "No no... definitely not Sir... Lord," he stammered, making Sugar sound like a wrathful Jahweh, putting in an appearance to smite the unprofitable. For another thing, all the contestants in Junior Apprentice are teenagers, which leaves the avid viewer in something of a conscience trap when it comes to gleeful loathing. Half the pleasure of The Apprentice has always been comeuppance – the certifiable ego-pump of the opening few minutes stirring in us a desire for public humiliation. Do we want to see teenagers cry, though? And even if we do (don't judge me till you've seen them in action), won't our self-indulgence leave a slightly sour taste behind it?

The 50 best Antiques shops

Whether you&rsquo;re after fantastic furniture or perfect paintings, Kate Watson-Smyth offers the experts&rsquo; guide to affordable auctions and sky&rsquo;s-the-limit galleries

Is car boot discovery a Knights Templar relic?

It sounds like Cash in the Attic meets the The Da Vinci Code. A pile of junk cleared from a country home finds its way to a car boot sale in a nearby market town. Among the detritus is a small piece of wood measuring just 10 inches by four inches and covered with painted figures.

Body of murdered antiques dealer exhumed

The body of an antiques dealer who was murdered in 1994 was exhumed today after detectives received "significant information" during a review of the case.

Antiques rise as a safe haven for wary savers



Wary savers are turning to antiques as a safe investment opportunity, pushing up auction prices.

The Johnsons: "Britain's No 1 crime family"?

He's spent the best years of his life behind bars, and heads a notorious crime gang said to have plundered &pound;80m of treasures from the grandest houses in the land. But now Jimmy Johnson is fighting back &ndash; and claims his clan are the victims of a massive Establishment stitch-up. Rob Sharp hears his side of the story

Portobello, By Ruth Rendell

The fine art of mystery in Notting Hill

Chrissie Rucker: colour and the White Company

She built a retail empire on neutral tones &ndash; but Chrissie Rucker still uses colour in her own home. Here she reveals where to shop if you want to splash out

For sale: 'antiques mansion' to the rich and famous

An aristocrat who turned her country mansion into a luxury antiques showroom frequented by the rich and famous is putting the house and its entire contents for up for auction.

Peter Coke: Voice of radio sleuth Paul Temple

To the 1940s baby boomers – those born in the six years from 1944 to 1950 and brought up on a strict diet of the Home Service and the Light Programme on the wireless during the 1950s and the 1960s – certain radio voices will never be surpassed, or even matched. Holmes and Watson will forever be Carleton Hobbs and Norman Shelley; the Mayor of Toytown will be Felix Felton; Jeeves and Wooster are Richard Briers and Michael Hordern; and Paul Temple, Francis Durbridge's radio sleuth, will always be, incontestably, Peter Coke.

Jailed: the family that stole &#163;30m of property from stately homes

For two decades, they have been the scourge of the aristocracy, launching audacious raids on some of the country's most prestigious stately homes.

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