Travel Me casa, su casa: the breakfast room

A creative, globe-trotting couple have put their stamp on a pair of 1920s buildings in Barrio Italia. By Sorrel Moseley-Williams

'George III' and 'Queen Charlotte' at the RA – both painted by Johan Zoffany in 1771

Johan Zoffany RA: Society Observed, Royal Academy, London

A German-born observer of British society is eclipsed today by Gainsborough and Reynolds, but his pictures, decoded, are revealing

London Pictures, a new exhibition by artists Gilbert and George, presents a starkly different image of London from the one promoted to visitors for the Olympics

An even bigger splash by Gilbert and George

Over the past six years, artists Gilbert and George have pinched 3,712 lurid headline posters from their local newsagent. The result, London Pictures, is an exhibition that presents a starkly different image of London from the one promoted to visitors for the Olympics.

Afghanistan worked the world maps of Turin-born Alighiero Boetti

Alighiero Boetti, Tate Modern, London

The star of Arte Povera is full of bright ideas in a show that winds its way through the human condition and its orderly creations, from postage stamps to vast embroideries

Botanical expertise: Mary Grierson

Mary Grierson: Floral artist celebrated as one of the most distinguished in her field

In 1960 a woman applied for the post of exhibitions officer at the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew. She didn't get the job, but was able to show her interviewers her portfolio of flower paintings, and was engaged instead as an artist in the herbarium. This was Mary Grierson, soon to become recognised as one of the world's most distinguished botanical artists.

Pete Doherty: 'I have a distinct memory of friends I had at school whose parents were, for want of a better word, bohemian. That was the kind of England that I thought I should have belonged to'

Pete Doherty: I was a bit unhinged

As the former Libertine prepares his UK debut as an artist, he talks frankly and exclusively to Matilda Battersby about Kate Moss, Amy Winehouse, his baby daughter and why he paints with his own blood

Damien Hirst at a preview for his exhibition 'Damien Hirst: The Complete Spot Paintings 1986-2011' at the Gagosian Gallery

Hirst rewards lovers of his hot spots

Intrepid fans who made 30,000 mile pilgrimage win prints that could be worth thousands

A sketch done by Paul

Is it art – or science? The robotic Rubens that redefines portraiture

Nick Clark sits for Paul, the computer with a head for figures

Graham Sutherland: 'Twisted Tree Form (1944)'

Graham Sutherland: An Unfinished World, Modern Art, Oxford
The Mystery of Appearance: Conversations Between Ten British Post-war Painters, Haunch of Venison, London

Sutherland is one of many mid-20th-century artists storming back into fashion at galleries and in salerooms alike

JMW Turner's Banks of the Loire (1829), in the National Gallery's Turner Inspired: In the Light of Claude from March

Hockney and Turner take the scenic route

It's a good year for British landscapes, but Munch and Mondrian lead the Continental challenge

Eternal Gaze: Lady with an Ermine, a star of the National Gallery's Da Vinci show 

Arts review of 2011 - Visual Art: Calm down – it's just another Leonardo...

Beyond the overbearing and clunking blockbusters, the year's best shows were far-flung, small and perfectly formed

Penhall says: 'Australian cinema is producing some really gritty hard-boiled, honest film-making right now.'

Cultural Life: Joe Penhall, playwright

Theatre: Arnold Wesker's 'The Kitchen' is one of my favourite plays. I saw a matinee of Bijan Sheibani's revival at the National and was transported. It's a warm, penetrating study of working life and the bonds that hold society together. It's also a very funny, moving portrait of migrant life in London,not long after the Second World War.

Deafblind artists give unique vision of the world

An insight into the unique perspective on life of people with neither sight nor hearing is being provided by an exhibition of artwork by two deafblind artists.

Exhibition about Lewis Carroll’s strange little girl

Alice just keeps on growing: The rich legacy of Lewis Carroll's strange little girl

She has spawned art, films, music and merchandise and now a new exhibition

Eyes on the Turner Prize

It is famed for its wacky works – and with one piece titled The Same Old Crap, this year's Turner Prize is no exception

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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine